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JK Rowling writes new 1,500 word Harry Potter story Watch

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    JK Rowling has written a new 1,500-word Harry Potter story on her website Pottermore.

    Harry has a cut above his eye and grey hair, Ron's hair has thinned, Hermoine's hair has suffered some kind of decline.

    Do we need to know any more? Should JK Rowling be writing more about the Harry Potter characters or do we know enough?

    Reading all of this is personally ruining my memories of the books, like when Rowling revealed Dumbledore's sexuality
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    Dumbledore being gay ruined the books?
    How?
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    It's interesting to see a bit about where the characters are from her point of view, but I'd rather imagine how the characters were doing myself. Its funny to see though that Rita Skeeter hasn't changed

    I also love how Teddy Lupin has become a bit of a badass, looks like he's taking after Tonks and Harry a bit more than Lupin.

    Side note - Daniel Radcliff already shot down the idea of there being a follow-up movie of them as adults after this story was released yesterday.

    Also, I always thought of Dumbledore as gay (I imagined him with a Stephen Fry-ish side) so that comment from Rowling just confirmed my thoughts
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    Dumbledore being gay ruined the books?
    How?
    The less we know about Dumbledore as a human being, the better. To me he was always more of an ideal and less of a wizard. He epitomized wisdom and incorruptibility, and was really representative of everything good in magic, with Voldemort being his opposite (and Grindlewald somewhere between). Giving him a clear sexuality just ruins it by bringing him down to our level, and making him less of a legend, more of a human.
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    Reading all of this is personally ruining my memories of the books, like when Rowling revealed Dumbledore is gay.
    Why is Dumbledore being gay a problem for you?
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    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    The less we know about Dumbledore as a human being, the better. To me he was always more of an ideal and less of a wizard. He epitomized wisdom and incorruptibility, and was really representative of everything good in magic, with Voldemort being his opposite (and Grindlewald somewhere between). Giving him a clear sexuality just ruins it by bringing him down to our level, and making him less of a legend, more of a human.

    Besides, I cannot read the books now without thinking about that (like him creeping around invisible in the first novel). "Do you want to touch my wand, young wizard?" *shudders*
    I like knowing Dumbledore as a human being, capable of love and capable of making mistakes. Goodness in magic should be reflected partly as learning from one's own errors, and 'bringing him down to our level' showed that everybody can be defeated, even those who were idolised the most in the wizarding world. I wouldn't want a headmaster or a friend who was so powerful that I couldn't make a real human connection with them, as Harry, Hagrid and McGonagall do.

    If Dumbledore were straight, would you be thinking the same thing about him praying on young female witches in the first novel? Your post smacks of homophobia and Rowling showed that people like Dumbledore who don't follow the 'norm' of sexuality can become some of the greatest people in the world, despite the enormous amount of discrimination they face.
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    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    The less we know about Dumbledore as a human being, the better. To me he was always more of an ideal and less of a wizard. He epitomized wisdom and incorruptibility, and was really representative of everything good in magic, with Voldemort being his opposite (and Grindlewald somewhere between). Giving him a clear sexuality just ruins it by bringing him down to our level, and making him less of a legend, more of a human.

    Besides, I cannot read the books now without thinking about that (like him creeping around invisible in the first novel). "Do you want to touch my wand, young wizard?" *shudders*
    I agree. Dumbledore for me was almost a god-like figure in the books; always there even if not present, all-good, all forgiving, wise etc etc. Making him gay gave him a human side, and that just didn't fit with the image that had previously been portrayed. Although it's nothing to do with the fact of being gay, if they had given him a girlfriend it still would have seemed weird.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    I like knowing Dumbledore as a human being, capable of love and capable of making mistakes. Goodness in magic should be reflected partly as learning from one's own errors, and 'bringing him down to our level' showed that everybody can be defeated, even those who were idolised the most in the wizarding world. I wouldn't want a headmaster or a friend who was so powerful that I couldn't make a real human connection with them, as Harry, Hagrid and McGonagall do.

    If Dumbledore were straight, would you be thinking the same thing about him praying on young female witches in the first novel? Your post smacks of homophobia and Rowling showed that people like Dumbledore who don't follow the 'norm' of sexuality can become some of the greatest people in the world, despite the enormous amount of discrimination they face.
    Didn't take long for someone to accuse me of homophobia. I am just saying Rowling did enough in the series to suggest Dumbledore was homosexual, without having to come out and state it. Same as if Rowling said in an interview 'oh by the way, Voldemort had a thing for gingers'. Information that is totally unnecessary.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    I like knowing Dumbledore as a human being, capable of love and capable of making mistakes. Goodness in magic should be reflected partly as learning from one's own errors, and 'bringing him down to our level' showed that everybody can be defeated, even those who were idolised the most in the wizarding world. I wouldn't want a headmaster or a friend who was so powerful that I couldn't make a real human connection with them, as Harry, Hagrid and McGonagall do.

    If Dumbledore were straight, would you be thinking the same thing about him praying on young female witches in the first novel? Your post smacks of homophobia and Rowling showed that people like Dumbledore who don't follow the 'norm' of sexuality can become some of the greatest people in the world, despite the enormous amount of discrimination they face.
    Oh please. Dumbledore was intended as the ideal good wizard, not as a paragon of excellence for gays. And they hardly face an "enormous amount of discrimination" in becoming successful.
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    (Original post by i-love-coffee)
    I agree. Dumbledore for me was almost a god-like figure in the books; always there even if not present, all-good, all forgiving, wise etc etc. Making him gay gave him a human side, and that just didn't fit with the image that had previously been portrayed. Although it's nothing to do with the fact of being gay, if they had given him a girlfriend it still would have seemed weird.
    Dumbledore had always been given a human side. When he talked to Harry about setting fire to his dormitory curtains, making a mistake when appointing Lockhart, accepting Tom Riddle into Hogwarts despite his background and behaviour, being angry with Harry out of care when demanding if he put his name in the Triwizard Cup, not letting Umbridge kick Trelawney out of Hogwarts, wearing Gaunt's ring, thinking the fake locket was real and drinking the Drink of Despair, I could go on. Giving him a sexuality further showed that he was just as human as the rest of the world.
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    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    Besides, I cannot read the books now without thinking about that (like him creeping around invisible in the first novel). "Do you want to touch my wand, young wizard?" *shudders*
    But if we were to assume he's heterosexual, he could say that to a witch...
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    Oh please. Dumbledore was intended as the ideal good wizard, not as a paragon of excellence for gays. And they hardly face an "enormous amount of discrimination" in becoming successful.
    Have you never looked at the anti-gay laws in Uganda, the repealed Buggery Act in the UK, etc? Obviously in developed countries gays do not face as much discrimination in today's world and can be as successful as anyone else, but this has not always been the case. Many young readers struggling with their sexuality can now see that even through fiction, gay people can be as successful and respected as Dumbledore, and the fact the information was given out to fans shows these people how accepted they can be.

    Of course the novels are not intended for Dumbledore to be a paragon in their entirety, they are about magical people in a magical school. However, literature usually has other hidden and explicit meanings and interpretations and giving a good wizard a sexuality which has been (and still is in many places) demonised shows how accepting the world is and is still becoming. For Rowling to announce that one of the star characters of her hugely successful novels is homosexual really shows people that she is not scared of going against some people's prejudices, and is telling people that being gay is widely accepted, even at the cost of potentially losing money and fans.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Have you never looked at the anti-gay laws in Uganda, the repealed Buggery Act in the UK, etc? Obviously in developed countries gays do not face as much discrimination in today's world and can often be as successful as anyone else, but this has not always been the case. Many young readers struggling with their sexuality can now see that even through fiction, gay people can be as successful and respected as Dumbledore, and the fact the information was given out to fans shows these people how accepted they can be.

    Of course the novels are not intended for Dumbledore to be a paragon in their entirety, they are about magical people in a magical school. However literature usually has other hidden and explicit meanings and interpretations and giving a good wizard a sexuality which has been (and still is in many places) demonised shows how accepting the world is and is still becoming. For Rowling to announce that one of the star characters of her hugely successful novels is homosexual really shows people that she is not scared of going against some people's prejudices, and is telling people that being gay is widely accepted, even at the cost of losing money and fans.
    I'm not sure people living in hellholes like Uganda, where being gay is a crime, care all that much about Harry Potter.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    I'm not sure people living in hellholes like Uganda, where being gay is a crime, care all that much about Harry Potter.
    You've blatantly ignored 90% of my post because you can't address it properly. If Dumbledore were announced to be straight, would you have the image of him looking at little girls at Hogwarts and wanting to do things with them?
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    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    The less we know about Dumbledore as a human being, the better. To me he was always more of an ideal and less of a wizard. He epitomized wisdom and incorruptibility, and was really representative of everything good in magic, with Voldemort being his opposite (and Grindlewald somewhere between). Giving him a clear sexuality just ruins it by bringing him down to our level, and making him less of a legend, more of a human.

    Besides, I cannot read the books now without thinking about that (like him creeping around invisible in the first novel). "Do you want to touch my wand, young wizard?" *shudders*
    1. That's a paedophile, not a homosexual.
    2. Dumbledore made 2 of the BIGGEST mistakes in his life which showed his humanity, his love for Grindelwald which lead him down a path of heartbreak both romantically and as a result of this, this lead to the death of his sister which affected him in such a large factor after being so infatuated with him, he deliberated whether to practice the dark arts due to his love for him.
    As a result, this resulted in a 3 way duel between Dumbledore, Grindelwald and Dumbledore's brother. Dumbledore's sister, with her magic unstable tried to stop it but died due to her inability to control her magic.

    This shaped him to be the person who he was.

    Dumbledore as a result was meant to be shown to be human through his past due to having known death (allowing him the ability to see the horse skeleton things, forget the name) after seeing his sister die due to him albeit indirectly. He knew love and thus heartbreak and also, other kinds of love towards his students and friends showing his empathetic side to others.

    The point is, ALL these events (and more as mentioned by someone else) shaped him into the incredible man we all fell in love with reading the books.
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    Was so pleased to read this
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    1. That's a paedophile, not a homosexual.
    2. Dumbledore made 2 of the BIGGEST mistakes in his life which showed his humanity, his love for Grindelwald which lead him down a path of heartbreak both romantically and as a result of this, this lead to the death of his sister which affected him in such a large factor after being so infatuated with him, he deliberated whether to practice the dark arts due to his love for him.
    As a result, this resulted in a 3 way duel between Dumbledore, Grindelwald and Dumbledore's brother. Dumbledore's sister, with her magic unstable tried to stop it but died due to her inability to control her magic.

    This shaped him to be the person who he was.

    Dumbledore as a result was meant to be shown to be human through his past due to having known death (allowing him the ability to see the horse skeleton things, forget the name) after seeing his sister die due to him albeit indirectly. He knew love and thus heartbreak and also, other kinds of love towards his students and friends showing his empathetic side to others.

    The point is, ALL these events (and more as mentioned by someone else) shaped him into the incredible man we all fell in love with reading the books.
    That is what I mean, Rowling left it in the text that Dumbledore could be gay, no need for her to come out in an interview and specify. The fact we did not know aspects of Dumbledore like that for certain added a mysterious quality to him, preserving the sense of his transcendence.

    People accusing me of homophobia are quite frankly ridiculous. I am not opposed to revealing his sexuality because of some imagined agenda against homosexuals. It is that I do not like to know too much about such idols. It is a form of 'ignorance is bliss'. Perhaps it is because I like to make up his characteristics and qualities myself, perhaps it is something else.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    You've blatantly ignored 90% of my post because you can't address it properly. If Dumbledore were announced to be straight, would you have the image of him looking at little girls at Hogwarts and wanting to do things with them?
    I ignored 90% of your post because it was mostly a monologue on how literature can help gays feel better about themselves and reflect a more progressive society etc.

    I'm not the person who said him being gay conjured up those images in my head. I think you've got me confused with another user.
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    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    The less we know about Dumbledore as a human being, the better. To me he was always more of an ideal and less of a wizard. He epitomized wisdom and incorruptibility, and was really representative of everything good in magic, with Voldemort being his opposite (and Grindlewald somewhere between). Giving him a clear sexuality just ruins it by bringing him down to our level, and making him less of a legend, more of a human.
    Dumbledore was never an ideal; he had his clear faults (such as basically supporting a wizarding version of racial superiority in his youth). The fact that Dumbledore was gay was pretty clear after reading the 7th novel - JK Rowling didn't need to announce it.

    I hate people that say JK Rowling is ruining the books by writing more - she wrote this short story for free on Pottermore, which is basically a site full of extra pieces of information from the HP world that never made it to the books. This is a site for dedicated fans, and if you think it would spoil your image of the books, then don't bloody read it.
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    Dumbledore was never an ideal; he had his clear faults (such as basically supporting a wizarding version of racial superiority in his youth). The fact that Dumbledore was gay was pretty clear after reading the 7th novel - JK Rowling didn't need to announce it.

    I hate people that say JK Rowling is ruining the books by writing more - she wrote this short story for free on Pottermore, which is basically a site full of extra pieces of information from the HP world that never made it to the books. This is a site for dedicated fans, and if you think it would spoil your image of the books, then don't bloody read it.
    It really was not clear. It was inferred, but since I (and most) people read the novels as young children, I wasn't exactly looking out for, or even aware, of the sexual aspects of books and characters.

    Besides, she announced it in an interview, which was then plastered all over the news and the internet. And I never said she was ruining it by writing more, I never even mentioned that. Yes, this thread is about that, but I was talking specifically about the sexuality aspect as mentioned by one commenter. Don't get angry, and don't think your view is the only one that counts.
 
 
 
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