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    Hi,

    I'm currently a potential medical student.
    Once you've graduated and your in the hospital.
    What's the journey?
    For instance:

    First year: Junior Doctor Foundation year 1
    Second Year: Junior Doctor Foundation year 2

    What's next?
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    Speciality training to become a registrar or GP. GP training is 3 years after F2, then you're a GP. Speciality training (being a speciality registrar) in whatever field you want will take between 4 and 6 years, to become a registrar.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Speciality training to become a registrar or GP. GP training is 3 years after F2, then you're a GP. Speciality training (being a speciality registrar) in whatever field you want will take between 4 and 6 years, to become a registrar.
    I'm staring Med in September


    Do most ppl specialise in the field they want? Or do ppl have to do other things because of competition?
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    (Original post by HaQ_mAn_)
    I'm staring Med in September


    Do most ppl specialise in the field they want? Or do ppl have to do other things because of competition?
    It's a mixture.

    Often location is the a key factor in addition to specialty choice.

    More information can be found at modernising medical careers website - www.mmc.nhs.uk

    One of my friends got a post she wanted but in Sheffield and not in Bristol. She decided to take it but others have turned now similar job offers.


    However there is increasing pressure for junior doctors to become GPs - something I am personally keen to avoid!
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    You get to do it.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    With girls.


    And this...

    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Speciality training to become a registrar or GP. GP training is 3 years after F2, then you're a GP. Speciality training (being a speciality registrar) in whatever field you want will take between 4 and 6 years, to become a registrar.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Speciality training to become a registrar or GP. GP training is 3 years after F2, then you're a GP. Speciality training (being a speciality registrar) in whatever field you want will take between 4 and 6 years, to become a registrar.
    It usually only takes 2-3 years post-foundation, depending on specialty, to become a registrar. Then you spend 4-6 years as a registrar before becoming a consultant.
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    You get to do it.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    With girls.


    And this...
    I have never done it with a girl. This is lies. :mad:
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    I have never done it with a girl. This is lies. :mad:
    I have no witty comment to come up with and respond to you. So hi :hi:
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    It usually only takes 2-3 years post-foundation, depending on specialty, to become a registrar. Then you spend 4-6 years as a registrar before becoming a consultant.
    What is the shortest way to consultant, in terms of specialty? For example, neurosurgeons are among the longest.
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    (Original post by slg60)
    What is the shortest way to consultant, in terms of specialty? For example, neurosurgeons are among the longest.
    As far as I'm aware it's cardiology. But I'm not 100% sure


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    (Original post by slg60)
    What is the shortest way to consultant, in terms of specialty? For example, neurosurgeons are among the longest.
    I think histopathology, radiology and possibly microbiology, are 5 years post-foundation. Emergency medicine is 6. Most others are 7-8 to complete training, but in many specialties people will undertake extra fellowships to gain experience in a subspecialty area or to enhance their CVs to increase the chances of getting a consultant post. Taking time out for an MD/PhD is also not uncommon.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I think histopathology, radiology and possibly microbiology, are 5 years post-foundation. Emergency medicine is 6. Most others are 7-8 to complete training, but in many specialties people will undertake extra fellowships to gain experience in a subspecialty area or to enhance their CVs to increase the chances of getting a consultant post. Taking time out for an MD/PhD is also not uncommon.
    How important is it to do a MD/PhD if you want a position as a consultant?
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    (Original post by slg60)
    How important is it to do a MD/PhD if you want a position as a consultant?
    Depends on your specialty. More common in oncology, cardiology, neurosurgery and probably a few others. In my specialty (anaesthetics) some people have them but it's not essential at all.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Depends on your specialty. More common in oncology, cardiology, neurosurgery and probably a few others. In my specialty (anaesthetics) some people have them but it's not essential at all.
    So the most competitive then? Do most burns surgeons (plastics) have them?
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    (Original post by slg60)
    So the most competitive then? Do most burns surgeons (plastics) have them?
    Yes. Apparently (nearly?) all the plastics trainees in Oxford have a DPhil/PhD or are working on one.
 
 
 
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