Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Becoming a solicitor when you're not from the UK Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,

    I posted this in the Uni-Law forum, but then realized that this one existed and decided to post it here as well, since it seems much more suited to the question.

    I'm about to begin my penultimate year in university in Prague. I don't want to stay in the Czech Republic after I receive my BA in Humanities. I would much prefer to do a conversion course in the UK and become a solicitor.


    I am not currently studying a law course. I'm doing a humanities course which will result in a BA. I'm hoping to graduate with either a magna *** laude or a summa *** laude. If things go as well as they are going now, it will be a summa *** laude. I believe this translates to a UK 'first'.

    Anyway, I'd love to do an MA or GDL in Law. I was wondering, what other steps must one take in order to become a solicitor? Is the LPC mandatory? Is there anything else which is mandatory after that in terms of schooling?

    As for the traineeships, what do they look for in applicants? Can anyone apply or does it have to be a UK applicant? Does having law related internships benefit the applicant or is experience not as important?

    Another thought that's been worrying is the question of me being foreign. I know it's difficult to become a solicitor as it is, but would you say it's hopeless for a foreigner to establish themselves as a solicitor in the UK? Or is it doable? I know that the open door policy for jobs in the UK has caused a controversy when it comes to the flooding of immigrants from Eastern European countries, so I'd like to know whether this would be an issue when looking for legal jobs.

    I'm looking for realistic answers, so feel free to switch off your political correctness when answering.

    I just really don't want to stay in the Czech Republic and I haven't really lived there much throughout my life. My other alternative is to try and get some sort of funding and do Law school in the US, but I would much rather prefer to stay in Europe.

    What are your thoughts?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am in a similar situation myself, I am from Pakistan with a Bachelors of Business/Commerce from Monash (AUS). However as I do hold offers for the GDL myself I could answer your first question. For the shortest route you would need to take the GDL for the LPC and not the MA Law if your talking about the masters only or the LLM. It is important to notice that you need a Certificate of Academic Standing from the SRA in order to enrol on the GDL program.
    However you could do the MA LAW (QLD 2 years) program that is for example the one at Bristol or even Sheffield University as they are qualifying law degrees. You can even take the 2 year senior status LLB at any of the uni's there seems to be quite a few good bunch of Unis, from the high ones to the low ones, so do check that.

    I would just add one thing though I am not pretty firm with my choice either but after consulting a professional and certain UK universities. I found out that it is better to take the LLB (Senior) or the MA law (senior) rather than the GDL. However the gdl is a shorter route and obviously the cheaper one. Personally I have to make the choice between senior status LLB (2 years) and the GDL and from the looks of it I am going for the Senior Status, because (this is the idea got after some serious consultation):
    it's an academic qualification better recognized worldwide, a wide array of options, could work in a variety of sectors with the degree lone (this comes from a university counselor/admissions tutor) this was the response I got when I contacted a number of universitiesyou can progress to both the BPTC and LPC afterwards. But that applies to my case since I'm from a Non-EU nation so I'm guessing your scenario would be a bit different one you will be considered EU right? So e.g. lesser tuition and better working rights.

    For your second question it would be wrong for me to give you a concrete piece of guidance, you might know better than me I guess that how the EU economic situation is and from the looks of it UK is not any different, just from what I heard and read it is very very hard, you have to be the top notch to get the training contract and even the LPC is dwindling market that is according to a uk colleague who commented here on the TSR. But again someone from UK would know better than me so this is just from what I heard from friends & family.

    Obviously U.S is one of the best, could even turn out to be better economically in the future who knows, you would have to go for the JD though unless you got too much $$ it could be a tough ride there considering the JD costs. As for law personally I would go for UK considering the quality and history though it's not cheap but not as expensive plus if I were a EU national I would consider myself lucky to be able to study law in the UK with those tuition fees if I compare them to the overseas ones.

    Hope it helps all the best. !
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.