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    I've graduated this summer with a 2:2 from university. Throughout my 2nd and 3rd year I was suffering with health issues which affected my grades dramatically. I only made uni aware of these in my 3rd year.

    I am happy with my degree classification, as I honestly didn't think I was going to be able to make it through third year.

    I'm struggling to find work, mostly because graduate roles tend to require a 2:1 and I know my application will just be binned straight away.

    A few positions I've looked at however have said they will accept a 2:2 if legitimate mitigating circumstances can be proven,

    How do I go about this? I'm not ill anymore, so can't get a Dr's note/don't think it's the right thing to do.

    Is there any way I can get the university to confirm I had extenuating circumstances?

    Or should I just resign myself to the fact that these jobs are no longer within my grasp through the traditional route?
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    My advice would be try and progress onto a Masters and hopefully get yourself a decent degree.
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    2:2
    4:4
    8:8
    10:10
    10/10
    Therefore you win
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    (Original post by KindofGood)
    My advice would be try and progress onto a Masters and hopefully get yourself a decent degree.
    Masters is far too expensive, and in all honesty (for me) a waste of time for my chosen career path.

    I wouldn't exactly say a 2:2 wasn't a 'decent' degree. At the end of the day it's a degree, and better than no degree at all.
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    Ultimately, what do you want to do?
    i.e. what are your aspirations? What do you find interesting? What is your degree in?
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    Make a university tutor or someone from the disability office (basically, someone who knew of your health problems and saw a doctor's note at the time) one of your referees? That's what I've done in the past :yes:
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    (Original post by KindofGood)
    My advice would be try and progress onto a Masters and hopefully get yourself a decent degree.
    The autofilter will still reject people without a 2.i.
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    (Original post by GeorgieGee)
    I've graduated this summer with a 2:2 from university. Throughout my 2nd and 3rd year I was suffering with health issues which affected my grades dramatically. I only made uni aware of these in my 3rd year.

    I am happy with my degree classification, as I honestly didn't think I was going to be able to make it through third year.

    I'm struggling to find work, mostly because graduate roles tend to require a 2:1 and I know my application will just be binned straight away.

    A few positions I've looked at however have said they will accept a 2:2 if legitimate mitigating circumstances can be proven,

    How do I go about this? I'm not ill anymore, so can't get a Dr's note/don't think it's the right thing to do.

    Is there any way I can get the university to confirm I had extenuating circumstances?

    Or should I just resign myself to the fact that these jobs are no longer within my grasp through the traditional route?
    Work experience...
    Volunteer your services and work yourself up to paid position...
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Ultimately, what do you want to do?
    i.e. what are your aspirations? What do you find interesting? What is your degree in?
    Honestly, I'm not entirely sure yet.

    I'm currently applying for HR positions. I'd rather go in at graduate level, but I know it's possible to work your way up, so it's not like it's the end of the world.

    It's just annoying to be automatically filtered out!

    My degree's in Geography - I want to eventually become a teacher, but I really want a substantial amount of 'real life' experience first. I don't want to have been in the education system, one way or another, forever.
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    Employers don't pay for grades, they pay for what employees contribute to the business. You never saw Alan Sugar asking apprentices about their grades but he was dead interested about what they could do.

    It is getting a bit annoying when people with 2:2 and lower whinge about how their life is over because they can't get into a grad scheme or do a PhD.

    In all seriousness, there are ample ways you can show a potential employer how you can be a great asset to his business. It starts even before you go to uni by getting jobs, volunteering, getting involved in societies, networking etc. After uni, you can carry on with these things plus you can add to your employability by doing courses such as IT skills, interview training, working with the young, elderly, disabled, get a job regardless of pay/prospects etc.

    Stop feeling sorry for yourself and get on with your life.
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    (Original post by GeorgieGee)
    Honestly, I'm not entirely sure yet.

    I'm currently applying for HR positions. I'd rather go in at graduate level, but I know it's possible to work your way up, so it's not like it's the end of the world.

    It's just annoying to be automatically filtered out!

    My degree's in Geography - I want to eventually become a teacher, but I really want a substantial amount of 'real life' experience first. I don't want to have been in the education system, one way or another, forever.
    Just apply to everything and anything, and see what you can get. Remember a job can always be a step up to another
    A masters would help, as I'm not sure how Geog would provide knowledge that would be useful in something like PR?
    The Prospects website may be of help.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Employers don't pay for grades, they pay for what employees contribute to the business. You never saw Alan Sugar asking apprentices about their grades but he was dead interested about what they could do.

    It is getting a bit annoying when people with 2:2 and lower whinge about how their life is over because they can't get into a grad scheme or do a PhD.

    In all seriousness, there are ample ways you can show a potential employer how you can be a great asset to his business. It starts even before you go to uni by getting jobs, volunteering, getting involved in societies, networking etc. After uni, you can carry on with these things plus you can add to your employability by doing courses such as IT skills, interview training, working with the young, elderly, disabled, get a job regardless of pay/prospects etc.

    Stop feeling sorry for yourself and get on with your life.
    Not feeling sorry for myself, I'm aware there are plenty of other ways to get into these positions.

    I'm just asking how to provide evidence so I don't get filtered out when I have legitimate mitigating circumstances, when I'm sure I can bring something to that particular role.

    I'm not just focused on jumping on a grad scheme, I'd love to be hired by a SME where I can really develop my skills, but again, they'd just love a 2:1 over a 2:2.
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    (Original post by GeorgieGee)
    Honestly, I'm not entirely sure yet.

    I'm currently applying for HR positions. I'd rather go in at graduate level, but I know it's possible to work your way up, so it's not like it's the end of the world.

    It's just annoying to be automatically filtered out!

    My degree's in Geography - I want to eventually become a teacher, but I really want a substantial amount of 'real life' experience first. I don't want to have been in the education system, one way or another, forever.
    How about teaching in South East Asia? You'll be getting valuable work experience, getting paid some money + getting some "real life" experience.
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    You could talk to a post-graduate admissions person to see what the opinion is on the other side, but there may be ways of re-establishing your academic credentials. Some kind of continuing education classes taught by real faculty who give legitimate grades. Or there might be some other not-totally-academic schooling that your work needs that offers some sort of distinction.

    This is not quite your situation, but after getting honors in English and a general *** Laude membership from a high-end prep ("public" to you) school in the US, I very much underperformed in college. There was nothing awful or incriminating, which turned out to be a bit of a problem. Those were the four years that my family decided to disintegrate and I was unfortunately doing just well enough to have no idea how messed up I was.

    Later I did get into a good MBA program and got unusually high grades and distinctions there-- partly because I was a lousy networker, so I needed to attract the attention of consulting firms somehow! I also did some continuing ed classes at a local high-prestige university with a batch of A grades. We shall see where all this winds up, but I've recently been given a few encouraging whispers from the part-time master's program in my area of interest-- at Cambridge!

    By this point in my life, it wouldn't really be connected to a career choice. I'm thinking of it it more for my own personal interest than anything else, and I'd look forward to getting something done with my research proposal. If I do get in, however, it will also be a clean slate that will make any other sort of academic work possible to consider. My undergraduate grades do look better when you realize that they came from a hard-grading school before the massive recent grade inflation, but they still don't translate perfectly to a 2:1. A well-done master's from Cambridge, on the other hand-- that's a good clean credential to have in your pocket.
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    (Original post by GeorgieGee)
    Not feeling sorry for myself, I'm aware there are plenty of other ways to get into these positions.

    I'm just asking how to provide evidence so I don't get filtered out when I have legitimate mitigating circumstances, when I'm sure I can bring something to that particular role.

    I'm not just focused on jumping on a grad scheme, I'd love to be hired by a SME where I can really develop my skills, but again, they'd just love a 2:1 over a 2:2.
    Sure, a 2:1 would be great, you can then battle with all the other people with 2:1 and Ist but you don't and thats tough.

    But you have a lot more to offer I am sure and to focus entirely on grades will narrow down what you are and define you.

    You need to expand, not narrow. Maybe someone will be persuaded that you are really a 2:1 grad, thats great. There are tens of thousands of them and a lot of them don't have jobs or have jobs that are boring and low paid because they have the grade but don't have what employers really want.

    You are far more than your grades I am certain of that. You have imagination, creativity, planning, team working, problem solving, assessing risks and rewards, motivating people, persuading people, IT skills, getting ahead of deadlines plus a lot more. If you don't have these, find ways to get them and demonstrate it to employers.

    You can even start your own business, it does not have to be big or even make money. It will give you experience and knowledge and that is far more valuable than grades.

    I have a 2:2 and after my first low paid job, I have had a good run with various sales, admin and management jobs until I got made redundant and started my own business.
 
 
 
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