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    Hi everyone,

    I'm applying to the RAF to be an ABM and am a few weeks away from my filter interview. What's bothering me at the moment is a rumour I've heard that at some stage in the process (I would guess it's after OASC) they'll want to do the kind of background check that involves contacting friends, family, and partners (current and previous) to make sure there's nothing I haven't mentioned which could be blackmail material later on. I know I'm going into a high-security job where blackmail could be a very real problem but is there any truth to this rumour? I have one recent ex who really won't want to hear from me, let alone from a recruiting officer calling on my behalf, and I don't think her testimony would do me any favours!
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    Hi,

    Those checks are for everyone, even enlisted, it is possible that even more so for your trade, but let them deal with it. I had an ex who's always had money troubles and is on several black lists, but was told that doesn't reflect on me, plus it was more than 3 years ago, so I didn't need to put him in my NSV.
    Just make sure you answer everything, however trivial or ridiculous you may find it. They don't care for answers as much as they care that you are truthful and not easily swayed, as that is their main concern.

    Also it won't be recruiter who checks, DBS NSV (Defence Business Services National Security Vetting) that does it.
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    Linguist

    I've dragged this out for you to put your mind at rest. Basically describes the types of clearance and checks required for each.

    Unless someone knows better, am pretty sure the initial clearance for ABM would be Security Check (SC)

    This does not ordinarily require interviews, simply checks on various databases as detailed below. If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.

    Should you need a DV later in life, then the only interviews would be with yourself, supervisors, and your nominated referees. I can't see where your ex would be anywhere in the loop.

    Hope that clears it up.

    PS Ignore the references to IT jobs, the information is taken from a job site, but describes the UK Govt National Security Vetting system as applied to UK Armed Forces , other agencies, and personnel who require clearance for access to UK protected information.



    Types of national security clearance

    There are four main types of Security Clearance – Baseline, Counter Terrorist, Security Check and Developed Vetting. Below is an outline of each type of Security Clearance, along with information on the process, how long it takes, and the types of IT jobs it applies to.

    The important thing to remember is that Security Clearance checks are conducted in line with a specific IT job role, and need to be requested by a company not an individual. So while Security Clearance may require some time and paperwork, if successful it will lead to a new IT job – as well as career rewards such as a good salary, role security and plenty of opportunity.

    Baseline Security Clearance

    There are two types of check in this category: Baseline Personnel Security Standard (BPSS) (Formally Basic Check) and Enhanced Baseline Standard (EBS) (formerly Enhanced Basic Check or Basic Check +). A BPSS or EBS aims to provide an appropriate level of assurance as to the trustworthiness, integrity, and probable reliability of prospective employees.

    What is BPSS?
    BPSS is an entry level security check, and will take one or two days to complete. Not technically a security clearance, it uses the Police National Computer (PNC) to make sure a candidate has no convictions. The check returns evidence of any current criminal record and un-spent convictions under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.

    A BPSS acts as a pre-employment check, signalling good recruitment and employment practice in general. The check is carried out by screening identity documents and references.

    What is EBS?
    An EBS is not a formal security clearance check; however it is a prerequisite for the other types of security clearances outlined next.

    This type of check allows supervised access to top secret material. To attain this, the same checks as above apply, as well as a mandatory interview and references from people who are familiar with the person's character in both home and work environment.

    What IT jobs do they apply to?
    Typically BPSS and EBS checks apply to jobs in the public sector and Armed Forces (both permanent and temporary) as well as private sector employees working on government contracts (e.g. contractors and consultants), who require access to, or knowledge of, confidential government assets.

    BPSS and EBS Security Clearance checks are normally conducted by recruitment authorities or companies to the agreed standard. Because they underpin the national security vetting process it is vital that they are carried out properly and thoroughly and before any further vetting is completed.

    Counter Terrorist Check (CTC) or (CTC Cleared)
    The Counter-Terrorist Check (CTC) is most commonly required by police, legal agencies and government agencies hiring contractors. A CTC will normally take up to six months to complete and is usually valid for 3 years.

    What is a CTC?
    The purpose of the CTC is to prevent persons who may have connections with terrorist organisations, or who may be vulnerable to pressure from them, from undertaking certain security duties where sensitive information may be compromised.

    A CTC does not allow access, knowledge or custody of protectively marked assets and information, but the Baseline Personnel Security Standard (outlined above, and normally undertaken as part of the recruiting process) does unlock some restrictions. It is carried out as part of the CTC as part of the vetting process, along with:

    Departmental / Company Records Check
    Security Questionnaire
    Criminal Record Check
    Security Service Check

    What IT jobs does it apply to?
    CTC Security Clearance is needed by IT professionals whose work involves:

    • close proximity to public figures

    • giving access to information or material vulnerable to terrorist attack

    • unrestricted access to certain government or commercial establishments assessed to be at risk from terrorist attack

    To gain CTC clearance you’ll normally need to have been a UK resident for a minimum of 3 years. Occasionally it may also be necessary to attend an interview with a DfT security officer. At the end of the vetting process, the information is assessed and a decision made to refuse or approve a CTC clearance.

    Security Check (SC) or (SC Cleared)

    Security Clearance (SC) is the most common type of vetting process. Transferable between government departments, it covers a wide range of jobs from IT and health to government, MoD, defence and private sector.

    What is SC?
    Valid for five years for contractors, and ten years for permanent employees, SC is for IT professionals who need substantial access to secret, occasionally top secret, assets and information.

    To gain (SC) clearance you will normally need to have been a UK resident for a minimum of 5 years, and will need to successfully complete all stages of the vetting process which includes:

    Baseline Personnel Security Standard
    Departmental/Company Records Check
    Security Questionnaire
    Criminal Record Check
    Credit Reference Check
    Security Service Check

    On completion, information is assessed and a decision made to refuse or approve the clearance application. It will usually take a minimum of six weeks to complete, and is generally reviewed every ten years.

    Developed Vetting (DV)
    Developed Vetting DV is the most comprehensive and expensive form of UK security vetting; and therefore only required for the most sensitive appointments and tasks.

    This level of Security Clearance provides substantial unsupervised access to top secret assets, or for people working in the intelligence or security agencies. A small number of clearances are granted, and renewed annually depending on the employer, and circumstances of the employment.

    What IT jobs does it apply to?
    Typical DV security cleared IT jobs include positions within the MoD, government, defence and aerospace.

    The stringent security check is much more specialised and job related: “A contractor would go to a specific contract role within a specific organisation and the developed vetting would be tailored specifically for that contract.”

    What’s involved?
    To gain (DV) clearance you will normally have been a UK resident for a minimum of 10 years. You’ll also need to go through several stages of the vetting process to become approved:

    Baseline Personnel Security Standard
    Criminal Record Check
    Departmental/Company Records Check
    Completion of a (DV) questionnaire
    Credit Reference Check and review of personal finances
    Security Service Check
    Check of medical and psychological information provided
    Subject Interview and further enquiries, which will include interviews with character referees and current and previous supervisors (checking of references (social, employment, education etc) in writing, by telephone or by interview from personal friends, tutors and employers as appropriate)

    On completion of the vetting process, information is assessed and a decision made to refuse or approve a DV clearance. For risk management purposes, follow-up work and monitoring is sometimes needed. This activity is known as ‘aftercare’, and may be required in connection with any of the above clearances.

    How long will DV clearance take?
    A DV will normally take a minimum of six months to complete. The officer assigned to the case will keep in touch during their enquiries and do their best to let you know how things are progressing. Because of the time the process takes, you shouldn't hand in your notice to your present employer until DV clearance is granted.

    Once a clearance is granted, it is only valid for a pre-determined period after which a review must be conducted. The time interval before a review is required is specified in guidance issued by the Cabinet Office but DVs are usually re-investigated after 5 years and every 7 years if there is a continuing need, depending on circumstances.
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    Thanks, both of you! It's good to be able to put a name (or an acronym) to the rumoured security check and it does sound like I have nothing to worry about. I knew they'd be quizzing me and checking for a criminal record so adding a couple of references which would be on my CV anyway is fine. And yes, it's all about being honest! I've heard some horror stories about people giving different answers at the filter interview and the OASC, it would be awful to get that far and screw it up.
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    Hi, if partners of someone who is being DV have had bead credit in the past in a previous relationship but now have finances in order, will this go against the person being DV, especially if that partner does not know their partners prior credit history before their relationship. My friends husband is being DV vetted, she was previously married and had previous debts but does not feel that her partner of 7 years needs to know this, will this be highlighted in the DV vetting.
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    The important thing to remember about DV is that it's not a check of how *good* you are as a person. It's to check to see how vulnerable you are to being exploited. Therefore if you're in debt (which lots of people are) or you have a weird fetish or you're cheating on your partner or *whatever*, then as long as you are honest about it in the interview, and also honest about who knows about it (i.e. you could say that you have a fetish for dressing up in women's underwear, but your wife does / doesn't know) then it's all good. If you can't trust or be trusted by your own side, then they won't be inclined to trust you with potentially country-wrecking information.

    The people who do the interviews will have heard it all (and worse) before.
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    Hi,
    I'm currently applying for the RAF and I’m at the vetting stage which I require the DV.
    My question is around listing current supervisors. I’m presuming that it’s likely that they will be contacted so I’m wondering how much will they be told? I.e. what it’s for as in a new job and applying to join the RAF?
    I ask because I've been told its likely that I won’t start the RAF until the end of the year because of phase 2 dates and at my current employment we are undergoing a review so I’m facing having reapplying for my job. So for that reason I haven't told them about applying for the RAF because of the impact that it may have.
    So basically I’m wondering if it’s time to come clean or not to my boss?
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    (Original post by B23V)
    Hi,
    I'm currently applying for the RAF and I’m at the vetting stage which I require the DV.
    My question is around listing current supervisors. I’m presuming that it’s likely that they will be contacted so I’m wondering how much will they be told? I.e. what it’s for as in a new job and applying to join the RAF?
    I ask because I've been told its likely that I won’t start the RAF until the end of the year because of phase 2 dates and at my current employment we are undergoing a review so I’m facing having reapplying for my job. So for that reason I haven't told them about applying for the RAF because of the impact that it may have.
    So basically I’m wondering if it’s time to come clean or not to my boss?
    Hi, have a read of this .Gov website, which tells you everything you need to know about the UK vetting process. I can't answer your question, but I see the vetting organisation have a Contact Us facility. Would probably be a good idea to explain the story above to them, and find out how (or if) they could support you by being discreet around your employers. It's unlikely they would deliberately disadvantage you, unless there is no other way round it. Assuming your current employers are a progressive and upfront organisation, any interview should not ask you about your future plans and whether the organisation fits into them; in a similar way that they're not allowed to ask a woman if she is pregnant or is planning to have children.

    Good luck with the interview, and your future role within the RAF.
 
 
 
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