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    Ok I'm a mum but parent to one son who graduated last year and another who has just finished his first year at uni.

    The son who graduated lives away from home because he works a distance away, mind you even if he worked locally I still think he'd have moved out. Unfortunately much of his "stuff" is still here at the family home.

    The younger brother has just moved back from his halls with most of his "stuff". Thankfully he got the keys to his rental house for next year so we could put a fair bit of the less valuable "stuff" in his new room. Fortunately he discovered the art and pleasures of cooking, mostly baking, during his first year but this means our very own Paul Hollywood in the making has accumulated even greater quantities of "stuff", equipment and the like. I suppose we should be grateful he doesn't aspire to be Heston Blumenthal or else we'd be looking for a niche in the house to store a nuclear reactor or something.

    Why is it that all the "stuff" that fitted so neatly into a study bedroom and two kitchen cupboards expands so massively once you bring it out? It is a similar effect to me climbing out of Spanx pants. So once you get it all home where does it go? Loft? Garage? Bedroom? Hall, living room and any other communal area where it is likely to cause a fire hazard? Are you having to mountaineer over big blue Ikea bags (got to love those things ) boxes and bin bags to find your bed? When was the family cat or dog last seen and is it buried under all that "stuff"? The cats are generally happy because all the "stuff" provides a new play area and nest to sleep in, the dogs might decide to chew it .

    To compound the issue do you have siblings who have similar quantities of "stuff" and your family home more resembles a landfill site?

    I suppose I shouldn't really complain as my own mother is still trying to get rid of my "stuff" from her house and I've only been left 26 years
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    (Original post by Folion)
    Ok I'm a mum but parent to one son who graduated last year and another who has just finished his first year at uni.

    The son who graduated lives away from home because he works a distance away, mind you even if he worked locally I still think he'd have moved out. Unfortunately much of his "stuff" is still here at the family home.

    The younger brother has just moved back from his halls with most of his "stuff". Thankfully he got the keys to his rental house for next year so we could put a fair bit of the less valuable "stuff" in his new room. Fortunately he discovered the art and pleasures of cooking, mostly baking, during his first year but this means our very own Paul Hollywood in the making has accumulated even greater quantities of "stuff", equipment and the like. I suppose we should be grateful he doesn't aspire to be Heston Blumenthal or else we'd be looking for a niche in the house to store a nuclear reactor or something.

    Why is it that all the "stuff" that fitted so neatly into a study bedroom and two kitchen cupboards expands so massively once you bring it out? It is a similar effect to me climbing out of Spanx pants. So once you get it all home where does it go? Loft? Garage? Bedroom? Hall, living room and any other communal area where it is likely to cause a fire hazard? Are you having to mountaineer over big blue Ikea bags (got to love those things ) boxes and bin bags to find your bed? When was the family cat or dog last seen and is it buried under all that "stuff"? The cats are generally happy because all the "stuff" provides a new play area and nest to sleep in, the dogs might decide to chew it .

    To compound the issue do you have siblings who have similar quantities of "stuff" and your family home more resembles a landfill site?

    I suppose I shouldn't really complain as my own mother is still trying to get rid of my "stuff" from her house and I've only been left 26 years
    eBay lol
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    I dunno about everyone else, but I'm selling what I don't need, binning the rest and taking only the stuff I need.
    If he's left his crap at home then tell him to get it moved before you hire a skip and do it yourself
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    Oh you have made me laugh. I am on my third uni STUFF hoarder. I liken it to a suitcase on the way back from holiday. The snug fitting of STUFF on the way out becomes impossible to pack back in on the way back - despite the fact you have jettisoned your boob tubes and inappropriate bikinis because you realise that mutton dressed as lamb is not a look you want to channel ever again ( until next year)


    My daughter lived in the tiniest room at uni - just room for a single bed. We had to make three trips in the car ( a big 4 wheel drive) to get the STUFF home. It is currently languishing in our shed - gathering mould. I can only suggest the garage if you have one.
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    I just got back home from first year of university and I just dumped all my stuff in 2 corners of my room so those 2 corners are like the blitz has just hit my room while the middle of my room looks somewhat relatively tidy. I'll be moving back out in 2 month though so i'm not bothered about the mess. My suitcase was even lying down in the middle of my room and I had to jump over it to get to my bed and to get out my room for 3 days before I emptied everything back into the wardrobes, lol.
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    (Original post by Folion)
    Ok I'm a mum but parent to one son who graduated last year and another who has just finished his first year at uni.

    The son who graduated lives away from home because he works a distance away, mind you even if he worked locally I still think he'd have moved out. Unfortunately much of his "stuff" is still here at the family home.

    The younger brother has just moved back from his halls with most of his "stuff". Thankfully he got the keys to his rental house for next year so we could put a fair bit of the less valuable "stuff" in his new room. Fortunately he discovered the art and pleasures of cooking, mostly baking, during his first year but this means our very own Paul Hollywood in the making has accumulated even greater quantities of "stuff", equipment and the like. I suppose we should be grateful he doesn't aspire to be Heston Blumenthal or else we'd be looking for a niche in the house to store a nuclear reactor or something.

    Why is it that all the "stuff" that fitted so neatly into a study bedroom and two kitchen cupboards expands so massively once you bring it out? It is a similar effect to me climbing out of Spanx pants. So once you get it all home where does it go? Loft? Garage? Bedroom? Hall, living room and any other communal area where it is likely to cause a fire hazard? Are you having to mountaineer over big blue Ikea bags (got to love those things ) boxes and bin bags to find your bed? When was the family cat or dog last seen and is it buried under all that "stuff"? The cats are generally happy because all the "stuff" provides a new play area and nest to sleep in, the dogs might decide to chew it .

    To compound the issue do you have siblings who have similar quantities of "stuff" and your family home more resembles a landfill site?

    I suppose I shouldn't really complain as my own mother is still trying to get rid of my "stuff" from her house and I've only been left 26 years
    Some of it has come back home and what I don't need at home has gone to my Mum's friend who lives not far from my uni.
 
 
 
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