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    Codecademy.
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    are you a software developer by any chance
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    Languages to do what, exactly?

    But still codeacademy.
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    Codecademy tutorials are more geared towards web development. For programming, it doesn't really matter what you learn at this stage. Java, Python, C++, C#, etc. are all sought after languages by employers. Once you learn the principles of programming, it's not too difficult to apply that when learning the syntax of another language.

    How old are you? Do you want to do this as a career? What country do you live in?
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    (Original post by z33sh4n786)
    Hello there can someone help me for learning languages for a software developer please

    could someone give me websites etc too help thanks
    Thenewboston might be worth checking out.
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    I'd honestly just recommend buying a book.
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    I'd learn C. It's not a massive language but its few features can be difficult to grasp for a beginner. Once C is learned then there are two good directions. One is building on a language which built upon C to include more complex features i.e. c++. The other direction is going 'below' C and looking at assembly (I went straight to x64 with all the extensions, but for a beginner; pure x86 is probably best).
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    codecademy is pretty good, signed up msyelf
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    (Original post by elohssa)
    I'd learn C. It's not a massive language but its few features can be difficult to grasp for a beginner. Once C is learned then there are two good directions. One is building on a language which built upon C to include more complex features i.e. c++. The other direction is going 'below' C and looking at assembly (I went straight to x64 with all the extensions, but for a beginner; pure x86 is probably best).
    OP wants to be a software developer, assembly isn't going to do ****. And even you've said C is hard to learn for a beginner, why skip the deep end altogether and jump into the sea when it's easy enough to get a grasp of the fundamentals in a scripting language, or even Java.
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    (Original post by Damask-)
    OP wants to be a software developer, assembly isn't going to do ****. And even you've said C is hard to learn for a beginner, why skip the deep end altogether and jump into the sea when it's easy enough to get a grasp of the fundamentals in a scripting language, or even Java.
    Assembly is still useful in the real world. There are a few tricks one can use assembly for that don't work for c++. It's also very useful from an educational perspective. When writing code like...

    if(some_bool) x=y; //where x and y are __int32

    ...
    you begin to wonder whether you get something efficient like...

    test al, al
    cmovnz eax, ebx


    or

    cmp al, 1
    jb keep_x ;hotspot for branch miss-predictions
    mov eax, ebx
    keep_x:


    As for C being hard for a beginner; I would say that can be negated with access to good teaching material. The good thing about C is that it's a lot more predictable than higher level languages. Once learned, a C programmer knows almost exactly what his code does on a lower level; how it manipulates memory etc. There is no "this is my code, I press compile, and the rest is magic", with C. Assembly is even more predictable, you know exactly how your code manipulates the CPU and memory. It also really opens your mind about how compilers work. I wouldn't worry about learning any "money making" languages when beginning anyway.
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    If you're trying to learn about programming it's a much better idea to use a language that allows you to think in a 'programmer way' whereby you can learn about flow control, why you'd use a certain data type, which scenarios you'd use a while loop over a for loop.

    Why get bogged down with memory management and pointers in C when you're not even aware of arrays? And the idea of learning assembly when just starting is laughable...


    Python is a great language to learn when you're beginning. Quite easy to read, not too verbose, powerful enough to accomplish almost everything you'd want to do whilst learning and is still valuable in the real world. Once you're then familiar with programming it's much easier to then move onto C and other lower level languages.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    Thenewboston might be worth checking out.
    This. He's the best.
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    (Original post by Sanctimonious)
    This. He's the best.
    I'm glad some can appreciate how good he is.

    I've been using him for Ruby
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    Why get bogged down with memory management and pointers in C when you're not even aware of arrays?
    I can also ask a different question: "why get bogged down with OO and fancy libraries" when a beginner can only take a guess at what they do? Why make beginners write a class to print 'hello world'? Surely that will just make them more confused?

    Memory management/pointers can be avoided for a few sessions. But the basic premise of them is really not that hard. C is very good for learning about flow control (which is one thing you highlighted), operators (boolean algebra is really good to learn in C), recursion and arrays. If a beginner starts in .NET or Java, he can easily end up playing around with UIs or file IO; which really isn't important or particularly educational.

    Lastly, I didn't suggest starting with assembly, but after C it's a viable pick. Although the reason it's a bad idea to start with, is more because you'd want to call into assembly from C functions; otherwise you'd be wasting tons of time calling printf() within ASM which isn't really learning after you do it for the first time. Also assembly is way more interesting/relevant if you already know a higher level language.
 
 
 
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