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How is uni different from secondary school in terms of studying? Watch

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    Did you find that your method of studying has changed? If so, how has it been altered?
    Any tips or advice?
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    I imagine a degree is quite a considerable step up from your bog standard GCSEs (which people get without revising).
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    At GCSE level you're pretty much spoon fed. At university you're left to fend for yourself and will have to keep up to date with readings, lectures, seminars etc to do well. I wouldn't worry about that just yet though, you still have to get through your A-levels first.
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    Lots of independent study required to get a degree

    compared to GCSEs where pupils can just be spoonfed information

    I like it that way because I can study the way I want to and won't be pressured into doing "group work" with people in class
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    (Original post by StarSurvivor)
    Did you find that your method of studying has changed? If so, how has it been altered?
    Any tips or advice?
    There is a lot more independent studying involved and you'll have to do a lot of extra reading. There's nothing like read this book and you'll know it all. Also a much deeper understanding is required to do well in exams.Overall a huge step harder.

    Advice, I'd say get lectures recorded ideally as a lot of them will be far too fast. Duing exam periods they'll come in really handy as some of the lecture notes will be really difficult to understand. Also, make a lot of notes during the lectures, ideally on the lecture slides (printed or handed out in the lectures) about what the lecturer says.
    If there are mathematical aspects, you'll need to do a lot more exercises and example questions before you'll know most of it. For other exam types, make sure to answer sample exam questions if available well in time so you can get your lecturer to mark them and give you some advice on how to improve on them.

    Overall, a lot more intensive!
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    Lots of independent study required to get a degree

    compared to GCSEs where pupils can just be spoonfed information

    I like it that way because I can study the way I want to and won't be pressured into doing "group work" with people in class
    Lucky for you, I had to do 3 group assignments in my first year of university all worth around 40% of the module grade.

    At OP in university you have to have much more motivation to study as you can't just go to classes and expect to pass you need to put in the effort and you will get much less help from your lecturers.
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    I'm talking about IB and A levels, not GCSEs. The IB curriculum is more difficult than A levels from what I've heard, but regardless.
    GCSEs are a joke compared to university of course.
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    Or does secondary school mean GCSE level? Sorry I'm not British so I wasn't really sure what term to use! I didn't know what the British equivalent of high school was. Am I supposed to say 6th form?
    Haha no wonder everybody was going on about GCSEs
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    (Original post by StarSurvivor)
    Or does secondary school mean GCSE level? Sorry I'm not British so I wasn't really sure what term to use! I didn't know what the British equivalent of high school was. Am I supposed to say 6th form?
    Haha no wonder everybody was going on about GCSEs
    Hello, we would refer to people doing A-levels or equivalent as someone at 6th form or in college.
    Most of the things said though are still correct just to a lesser extent, like you will still need to be more independent with your learning and you will still need to pay much more attention and take much more notes during lectures and the lecturers help much less than at A-levels.
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    Honestly people will make it sound like you will have all the responsibility dumped on you, while the uni will do nothing to help. That was very far from my experience.

    While the amount of work is higher and you are expected to do more work on your own the uni will most likely invest significant effort in at least badgering you for not handing work in, missing exams or generally doing badly. (Note: UEA kind of gave up.on me it seemed after a couple of months of me failing to improve, but to be fair, totally my fault and they made a considerable effort to help me).

    When it came to exams and coursework, most of the tricks I picked up at a level and gcse were more than enough to get me through and I had a much bigger problem with the formatting of lab reports and extended essays/papers than I did the content of them.
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    (Original post by muffingg)
    There is a lot more independent studying involved and you'll have to do a lot of extra reading. There's nothing like read this book and you'll know it all. Also a much deeper understanding is required to do well in exams.Overall a huge step harder.

    Advice, I'd say get lectures recorded ideally as a lot of them will be far too fast. Duing exam periods they'll come in really handy as some of the lecture notes will be really difficult to understand. Also, make a lot of notes during the lectures, ideally on the lecture slides (printed or handed out in the lectures) about what the lecturer says.
    If there are mathematical aspects, you'll need to do a lot more exercises and example questions before you'll know most of it. For other exam types, make sure to answer sample exam questions if available well in time so you can get your lecturer to mark them and give you some advice on how to improve on them.

    Overall, a lot more intensive!


    How did you record your lectures?
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    definitely study more mainly because i want a good degree, i've found studying in uni is easier because the exams are twice a year, at the end of semesters, and not all lumped at the end of the year (although i do have 1 or 2 that are like that), so there isn't as much stuff to learn.
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    (Original post by StarSurvivor)
    How did you record your lectures?
    You can use your phone's voice recorder, but I personally downloaded the app audionote on my iPad. It's also available for phones.
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    (Original post by muffingg)
    You can use your phone's voice recorder, but I personally downloaded the app audionote on my iPad. It's also available for phones.
    Stupid question but do the lecturers mind you doing that?


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    (Original post by melisa121)
    Stupid question but do the lecturers mind you doing that?


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    It really depends on the lecturer, for the most part you could easily ask and they will most likely say yes you can record. But if you just do it anyway it's unlikely you will get any negative repercussions.
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    (Original post by melisa121)
    Stupid question but do the lecturers mind you doing that?


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    Let's put it this way: In my first year I asked everyone before recording it because I thought some might mind. Nobody did, however. So in the following years I just recorded the lectures without asking them. They will never find out. You just have your ipad sitting next to your notebook and recording it. If they mind, they'll say it and even then you can still continue recording as they'll not find out.

    In a nutshell, just ask, but they wouldn't usually mind.
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    Classes in school: "Give me that magazine NOW! You're going to get a detention for this if you keep it up!"

    Classes in uni: "I'm going to talk and talk and talk. It's your degree so I don't give a flying **** if you read a magazine while I talk. And talk."
 
 
 
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