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'Backlash' after WC rape jokes flood Twitter (long - you've been warned) Watch

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    'Rape' has been used as a football metaphor for a while:


    The Germany/Brazil match was the most discussed sports event ever on twitter.
    Sources: http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/f...r-9593745.html
    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...r-sami-khedira


    ITweets such as these have been re-tweeted and favourited the world over:
    - How many of you witnessed what can only be described as the statutory gang rape of Brazil by the Germans yesterday nig
    - Which of the following crimes has Germany committed against Brazil?
    a.) Murder
    b.) Rape
    c.) Genocide
    d.) All of the above
    - "How do you say 'rape' in German? Brazil."

    With tweets like these in response:
    - Not for Brazil, but for women and men who have ACTUALLY experienced rape, as opposed to, you know, a loss in a soccer match.
    - If you are tweeting that Brazil got
    #raped in last night's game, do you mean that rapists are the winners?
    - The amount of sexist and rape jokes about the Brazil vs Germany game is truly disgusting and you ask why people justify violence agnst women



    So, what's your view on using a word like rape as a metaphor in football?

    It's a push to say that using it this freely desensitizes people to the act itself (which some will argue), but it's almost certainly true that it desensitizes people to the word itself, and arguably detracts from the seriousness of it.

    - How bad a thing is this?
    - Is it just the evolution of language, and something people need to accept?
    - And, can it be seriously argued that using the word in this way (with young people seeing and doing it) makes the act itself less serious to people?

    Sources:
    http://stream.aljazeera.com/story/201407092030-0023915
    http://www.thedebrief.co.uk/2014/07/...l#.U7-iK_ldWWz
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    Sorry for the horrendous layout.
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      Evolution of language. Live with it.

      It's like when terms like 'wog' to describe a black guy or 'mongol' used to describe a disabled person were used. Politicians and pressure groups might whine about it, but people will do it anyway.
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      I don't see the problem. People just looking for a reason to be offended.
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      It's funny; offence is taken, not given
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      Don't care. I use the word when someone gets destroyed at something. I will continue to use it. People can cry all they want. Get a life and complain about something that really matters.

      Not entirely sure how saying Brazil got raped is sexist and supports violence against women. That also implies men can't be raped.
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      (Original post by Anonymous Coward)
      'Rape' has been used as a football metaphor for a while:


      The Germany/Brazil match was the most discussed sports event ever on twitter.
      Sources: http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/f...r-9593745.html
      http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...r-sami-khedira


      Tweets such as these have been re-tweeted and favourited the world over:
      - How many of you witnessed what can only be described as the statutory gang rape of Brazil by the Germans yesterday nig
      - Which of the following crimes has Germany committed against Brazil?
      a.) Murder
      b.) Rape
      c.) Genocide
      d.) All of the above
      - "How do you say 'rape' in German? Brazil."

      With tweets like these in response:
      - Not for Brazil, but for women and men who have ACTUALLY experienced rape, as opposed to, you know, a loss in a soccer match.
      - If you are tweeting that Brazil got
      #raped in last night's game, do you mean that rapists are the winners?
      - The amount of sexist and rape jokes about the Brazil vs Germany game is truly disgusting and you ask why people justify violence agnst women



      So, what's your view on using a word like rape as a metaphor in football?

      It's a push to say that using it this freely desensitizes people to the act itself (which some will argue), but it's almost certainly true that it desensitizes people to the word itself, and arguably detracts from the seriousness of it.

      - How bad a thing is this?
      - Is it just the evolution of language, and something people need to accept?
      - And, can it be seriously argued that using the word in this way (with young people seeing and doing it) makes the act itself less serious to people?
      The whole situation is just stupid.

      The term "killed" is used everywhere:-

      "You killed the joke"
      "They killed my vibe"
      "Hahaha this is killing me"
      "You mad? Our team will kill yours"
      "This is killing me "
      "Haha I will kill you!!"

      And like the above, the possibilities to use the term "kill" are endless.

      Now, no one seems to have a problem with the term "kill" being used metaphorically?

      So tell me, is killing any better than raping?

      I do sympathise with people who have experienced rape and with those who have lost a loved one via murder, and it's understandable that using the two terms respectively may reignite horrible thoughts. But the two words have been used for a long time, and probably will be in the future.

      Making an issue out of this is.. Ridiculous really.
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      (Original post by Genocidal)
      Evolution of language. Live with it.

      It's like when terms like 'wog' to describe a black guy or 'mongol' used to describe a disabled person were used. Politicians and pressure groups might whine about it, but people will do it anyway.
      This seems to disprove your point. People don't use the words 'wog' and 'mongol' anymore so it seems like the pressure groups were successful.
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      Get over it m8
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      (Original post by ArtGoblin)
      This seems to disprove your point. People don't use the words 'wog' and 'mongol' anymore so it seems like the pressure groups were successful.
      That's because other words replaced them, not because people decided to stop using them.
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        (Original post by ArtGoblin)
        This seems to disprove your point. People don't use the words 'wog' and 'mongol' anymore so it seems like the pressure groups were successful.
        No, that's because language evolved again. People started to use '******' more often for black people (and I'm sure you can guess what six letter word beginning with 'n' I was alluding to).
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        (Original post by manchesterunited15)
        Get over it m8
        I have nothing to 'get over', as I'm not offended in the slightest.
        It's just a thread for discussion, and potentially some good points to be raised.
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        They used the word "nig" and are still associating genocide with the German people (it's unfair in my opinion to hold it over them as a collective), yet still try to take the moral highground.
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        (Original post by Anonymous Coward)
        I have nothing to 'get over', as I'm not offended in the slightest.
        It's just a thread for discussion, and potentially some good points to be raised.

        Ah, my bad. Tell them to get over it m8
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        (Original post by Genocidal)
        No, that's because language evolved again. People started to use '******' more often for black people (and I'm sure you can guess what six letter word beginning with 'n' I was alluding to).
        Did they? Seriously? Outside of hi-hop/rap/whatever it's called?

        The word you refer to used to be in common usage, to the extent that it was used by Enid Blyton, in her books for children. That was in the 1950s, and no-one questioned it. It was socially acceptable.

        Right now, today, you yourself just chose to carefully asterisk that word. That word has not become acceptable as a substitute for the other one. And I very much doubt I will be seeing it in a book in the children's section of Waterstones.
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        I think it's crass, but it isn't that rape is anything to do with football, it's an act of dominance. When you totally dominate someone against their will, the metaphor is that you raped them.
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          (Original post by Octopus_Garden)
          Did they? Seriously? Outside of hi-hop/rap/whatever it's called?

          The word you refer to used to be in common usage, to the extent that it was used by Enid Blyton, in her books for children. That was in the 1950s, and no-one questioned it. It was socially acceptable.

          Right now, today, you yourself just chose to carefully asterisk that word. That word has not become acceptable as a substitute for the other one. And I very much doubt I will be seeing it in a book in the children's section of Waterstones.
          No, the asterisks is TSR's profanity filter.

          In the case of that word, we've sort of evolved away from it, and then devolved back to it, and now we're pretty much over it again. Words sometimes come and go, but someone saying a word is bad isn't going to cause people to stop saying it.

          With the word 'rape' in football, that's more an extension of that word moving from every day usage in banter to sports. It's probably picking up the pace, but in twenty or thirty years it'll probably be replaced by something else.
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          (Original post by SHOO)
          The whole situation is just stupid.

          The term "killed" is used everywhere:-

          "You killed the joke"
          "They killed my vibe"
          "Hahaha this is killing me"
          "You mad? Our team will kill yours"
          "This is killing me "
          "Haha I will kill you!!"

          And like the above, the possibilities to use the term "kill" are endless.

          Now, no one seems to have a problem with the term "kill" being used metaphorically?

          So tell me, is killing any better than raping?

          I do sympathise with people who have experienced rape and with those who have lost a loved one via murder, and it's understandable that using the two terms respectively may reignite horrible thoughts. But the two words have been used for a long time, and probably will be in the future.

          Making an issue out of this is.. Ridiculous really.


          Well said.
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          "The amount of sexist and rape jokes about the Brazil vs Germany game is truly disgusting and you ask why people justify violence agnst women"

          Implying that male rape isn't a thing...I hate that a human issue is turned into a woman's issue.

          But I agree that it has desensitised the word, and the tweet that says "do you mean that rapists are the winners?" is silly, when you say someone got "raped" it just means they got utterly dominated, had no way of fighting it. It's crass but it gets the point across pretty well.
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          (Original post by Genocidal)
          No, the asterisks is TSR's profanity filter.

          In the case of that word, we've sort of evolved away from it, and then devolved back to it, and now we're pretty much over it again. Words sometimes come and go, but someone saying a word is bad isn't going to cause people to stop saying it.

          With the word 'rape' in football, that's more an extension of that word moving from every day usage in banter to sports. It's probably picking up the pace, but in twenty or thirty years it'll probably be replaced by something else.
          Ah. Well, the building stands, even if the soft-furnishings change.

          Do you foresee a point when TSR and its successors won't have that word in the profanity filter? People saying that word is bad got that word from featuring in book titles (Agatha Christie) to being pre-emptively censored on private websites.

          Culture changes.
         
         
         
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