Literature or Literature+Language?!

Watch this thread
freejaaa
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
I'm currently choosing A-Levels because I need to make a choice on a college soon, and I know that I want to take English Literature but I'm not sure whether to just take both literature and language instead? Does it make much of a difference??
Thankyouuuuuuuuuuuuuuu x
0
reply
The Empire Odyssey
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
I shall offer you some advice.

When considering A-levels as a whole, you should think about "why do I like these subjects", "am I good at it" and "can I see myself enjoying and learning more about the subject". Those are the questions that prompted me whether to take English (disregarding the fact that I want to become an English teacher).

If you study A-level English Literature, this will allow you develop your Literature knowledge and skills in great depth because you can home in on your skills in literature. Same if you decide to take Language on its own too. On the other hand, if you were to pick both Lang and Lit (the combined course?) then this will not allow you to get a solid foundation of English for depth, but it will allow you to create a nice breadth of knowledge in both elements of English.

Because you have specified whether you mean lit and lang as a combined A-level or taking the two separate English A-levels together, it makes it harder to give you some advice.

I myself, did the two separate A-levels and they went in-hand with each other, especially in the 2nd year. For instance in A2 Language we had to read 14th century "Black Atlantic" literature to look at how social class, and creole and pidgin language were formed in literature. So both my language and lit skills were tested in Language and vice versa for some of the things we had to do in Literature. Studying both A-level English is hard work and very time consuming esp in A2 where you have to read widely and independently for linguistic purposes in Lang and Literary Criticism for Lit.

However, if you do enjoyed studying them at GCSE level, then you should contemplate studying both. However, I know most the people in school who picked Lang, also picked Lit and pretty much all of them who carried both onto A2 have applied for English degree. So perhaps they already knew they wanted to study English. If you want to keep your options open and you enjoy Lit more than you do Lang, then you should really stick to just picking English Lit. However if you do not want to narrow your choices down to picking to English A-levels, you should go with the combined course. However it will restrict you on what you learn as you won't go in depth but it is still A-level and it will be a lot harder than GCSE.

I personally LOVE English and I always thought I would be at a disadvantage if I would have picked just one A-level English because English should be the enjoyment of both Lang and Lit. I don't have any regrets picking the two, but just make sure you are dedicated to them because even I hated having English Lang first thing on a Mon then Lit straight after. My AS and A2 timetable consisted of having either one English before or straight after the other so that did get really annoying, spending pretty much all my 2 years in one side of the school. However, this should not put you off. Just make sure you enjoy the subject enough to make you not regret picking it.
0
reply
TritonSails
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by freejaaa)
I'm currently choosing A-Levels because I need to make a choice on a college soon, and I know that I want to take English Literature but I'm not sure whether to just take both literature and language instead? Does it make much of a difference??
Thankyouuuuuuuuuuuuuuu x
My advice would generally be to take just the A-Level in English literature. It is probably what you think of when you think of 'English'; "English Language" is a completely different beast, and is basically a course in dumbed-down linguistics. You will necessarily do lots of close reading of language in the course of an A-Level in English literature anyway; English language is for people who are interested in things like how babies learn English and how language is used in the media. (IE, it's basically the most boring and patronising stuff from GCSE x 10).

English language is a totally different kettle of fish; it is not at all necessary to take it if you want to study English literature. History, philosophy, a foreign language, politics--these are A-Levels which will actually help you with an A-Level in English literature, especially if you want to study it at university.
0
reply
gothfather3
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
Although both shall work together nicely and you can incorporate skills learnt from each, from experience- English Literature on its own is a lot more straight forward.
0
reply
tgwktm
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
english lang and lit together is a lot more straight forward than just lit. i did english lang and lit and i did not have to put in half as much work as my friend who did english lit. i think it is the perfect course for english cause it include a little of both
0
reply
username4489224
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
I shall offer you some advice.

When considering A-levels as a whole, you should think about "why do I like these subjects", "am I good at it" and "can I see myself enjoying and learning more about the subject". Those are the questions that prompted me whether to take English (disregarding the fact that I want to become an English teacher).

If you study A-level English Literature, this will allow you develop your Literature knowledge and skills in great depth because you can home in on your skills in literature. Same if you decide to take Language on its own too. On the other hand, if you were to pick both Lang and Lit (the combined course?) then this will not allow you to get a solid foundation of English for depth, but it will allow you to create a nice breadth of knowledge in both elements of English.

Because you have specified whether you mean lit and lang as a combined A-level or taking the two separate English A-levels together, it makes it harder to give you some advice.

I myself, did the two separate A-levels and they went in-hand with each other, especially in the 2nd year. For instance in A2 Language we had to read 14th century "Black Atlantic" literature to look at how social class, and creole and pidgin language were formed in literature. So both my language and lit skills were tested in Language and vice versa for some of the things we had to do in Literature. Studying both A-level English is hard work and very time consuming esp in A2 where you have to read widely and independently for linguistic purposes in Lang and Literary Criticism for Lit.

However, if you do enjoyed studying them at GCSE level, then you should contemplate studying both. However, I know most the people in school who picked Lang, also picked Lit and pretty much all of them who carried both onto A2 have applied for English degree. So perhaps they already knew they wanted to study English. If you want to keep your options open and you enjoy Lit more than you do Lang, then you should really stick to just picking English Lit. However if you do not want to narrow your choices down to picking to English A-levels, you should go with the combined course. However it will restrict you on what you learn as you won't go in depth but it is still A-level and it will be a lot harder than GCSE.

I personally LOVE English and I always thought I would be at a disadvantage if I would have picked just one A-level English because English should be the enjoyment of both Lang and Lit. I don't have any regrets picking the two, but just make sure you are dedicated to them because even I hated having English Lang first thing on a Mon then Lit straight after. My AS and A2 timetable consisted of having either one English before or straight after the other so that did get really annoying, spending pretty much all my 2 years in one side of the school. However, this should not put you off. Just make sure you enjoy the subject enough to make you not regret picking it.
Sir i have serious question , is it impossible to do English lit with a grade 6 even tho I was predicted a 7.since year 7 I’ve enjoyed English however I have this CONSTANT FEAR I will be with people who got 789s and I will underperform . I’m so annoyed with myself I want English as my thirdoption Incas s I don’t wanna go with medicine in the future as I’ve also chose bio and chem . Any advice from anyone would help so much thank u!!!!!!
0
reply
The Empire Odyssey
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by laugh72)
Sir i have serious question , is it impossible to do English lit with a grade 6 even tho I was predicted a 7.since year 7 I’ve enjoyed English however I have this CONSTANT FEAR I will be with people who got 789s and I will underperform . I’m so annoyed with myself I want English as my thirdoption Incas s I don’t wanna go with medicine in the future as I’ve also chose bio and chem . Any advice from anyone would help so much thank u!!!!!!
Well, ignoring the obvious typos, it certainly isn't impossible. But it might be difficult to apply to universities that want a higher grade.

Originally, I got a grade C in my English GCSE. Before your time, we had Higher and Foundation tiers for our exams. Because I was in a low set for English, we didn't have a choice but to sit FT exams, so the highest possible grade we could get in an exam was a C. A few months before my GCSE exams, my English teacher inspired me to love English. I ended up getting a C, but was unable to pursue A-level English. So, I re-sat my GCSEs and a year later, I got a B. Two years later, I got a B in A-level English Language and a C in A-level English Literature. 4 years later, I graduated with an Upper 2:1 in English Literature (with Philosophy). And almost 1 year later, I am about to finish my MA in Public Relations and Media.

So, the point to my anecdote is this: you should aim to achieve a 7 or 8 (if you can). This will help you in your A-levels. Secondly, I came from a predicted D in GCSE English, to graduating with an Upper 2:1. So if I can do it, I don't see why you can't. You still have a year to improve your skills and abilities in English.

I think the constant fear will dwindle once you improve your close reading skills and your analytical writing skills. I re-wrote so many of my essays and always asked my English teacher to re-mark it until I got that B or A. So make sure you ask for help and ask your teacher to help you achieve the needed grade for you to pursue English.

In short, it's not impossible. With tenacity, patience and commitment, I'm sure you'll get there - as did I. Good luck!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How confident are you that you'll achieve the grades you need to get into your firm uni?

I think I've exceeded the grades for my university offer (29)
17.47%
I think I've met the grades for my university offer (43)
25.9%
I think I've missed the grades for my university offer (85)
51.2%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (9)
5.42%

Watched Threads

View All