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Are Job Prospects and competitiveness the same for all med schools? Watch

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    For example, someone applying to Cambridge and Leeds, are job prospects or competitiveness for medicine the same as everyone says?
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    When applying to med school it's important to play to your strengths - different unis look for different things. http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...your_Strengths

    There's no such things as a medical school that is the 'best' http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...school_is_best

    Job prospects are the same everywhere
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    (Original post by pheekum)
    For example, someone applying to Cambridge and Leeds, are job prospects or competitiveness for medicine the same as everyone says?
    "Prestige" doesn't make a difference.

    That said, you can get points for stuff like getting research published, having an intercalated degree, being ranked highly in exams within your medical school.

    So I'd say it can make a difference where you go, but it definitely isn't a case of "a more prestigious medical school gives you a better chance".
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    what about competitiveness to get in to med schools? are they the same eg. is it just as hard to get in cambridge as say keele
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    (Original post by pheekum)
    what about competitiveness to get in to med schools? are they the same eg. is it just as hard to get in cambridge as say keele
    I think it would be overly simplistic to say they are all equally competitive to get into.

    But, I'm not really sure if you can meaningfully predict which ones will be more competitive - remember that each can have their own selection criteria, and emphasise different parts of the application etc. So one that is difficult for one person to get into might be relatively easier for somebody else.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I think it would be overly simplistic to say they are all equally competitive to get into.

    But, I'm not really sure if you can meaningfully predict which ones will be more competitive - remember that each can have their own selection criteria, and emphasise different parts of the application etc. So one that is difficult for one person to get into might be relatively easier for somebody else.
    Absolutely you can't pin point which is the hardest to get into. For example I know someone who only got 1 offer and it was Cambridge because their style suited him while others did not. While another friend with far lower grades, lower bmat and ukcat for 3 offers because clearly she was well suited to the places she chose and she applied to her strengths!

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    Whilst going to any one particular medical school doesn't mean you will necessarily have a better career each medical school does have a tendency to produce more doctors in certain fields.

    E.g. Oxbidge - reserchers
    Peninsula (Exeter/Plymouth) - GPs
    Bristol - Surgery

    It's not everyone from these places does the following, but there is a stronger trend cohort after cohort to pursue certain careers.

    You can argue that this is because of the strengths/weaknesses and experiences the students have at medical school.

    Also when sitting postgraduate exams - certain medical school graduates are far more likely to pass first time
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    http://pmj.bmj.com/content/88/1039/249

    Although this is only for OBGYN i assume it to be similar across other post-grad exams.
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    (Original post by plrodham1)
    http://pmj.bmj.com/content/88/1039/249

    Although this is only for OBGYN i assume it to be similar across other post-grad exams.
    I always find papers like this interesting, thanks for linking it. They are probably the most objective answer to "best medical school" (whatever that means) discussions.

    I think the paper is laid out in a weird way, the way the author presents the paper it makes it sound different to the results. "The candidates of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Oxford performed significantly better. [on part 2]" although technically the ranking should be Newcastle, Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh. Alphabetical maybe? Seems odd, when they've presented the data in text in rank order for other sections of the paper (only noticed this because obviously I'm most interested in my med school!)

    This is very interesting:

    The MRCOG results are very similar to medical school graduates' performance in the primary FRCA examination; as far as better than average performance is concerned, the five medical schools which have shown better performance in that study were Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Bristol and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The MRCOG results are in contrast for the medical schools who have underperformed in the primary FRCA examination, which were Sheffield, Aberdeen, Leicester, Dundee and Belfast.6 There are similar medical school performances in the MRCP (UK) examination, with Newcastle, Oxford and Cambridge being on the upper quartile and Liverpool in the lower quartile of both series
    Seems like whatever medical schools are doing well or badly, it's affecting students across the board.
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    (Original post by pheekum)
    what about competitiveness to get in to med schools? are they the same eg. is it just as hard to get in cambridge as say keele
    They aren't all the same competitiveness but they are close enough to each other where you will get people who get accepted to "more competitive" schools and rejected from "less competitive" schools.

    its not like any other degree in the sense that there are limits to medical school places so just having a place is the difficulty.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I always find papers like this interesting, thanks for linking it. They are probably the most objective answer to "best medical school" (whatever that means) discussions.

    I think the paper is laid out in a weird way, the way the author presents the paper it makes it sound different to the results. "The candidates of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Newcastle and Oxford performed significantly better. [on part 2]" although technically the ranking should be Newcastle, Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh. Alphabetical maybe? Seems odd, when they've presented the data in text in rank order for other sections of the paper (only noticed this because obviously I'm most interested in my med school!)


    Seems like whatever medical schools are doing well or badly, it's affecting students across the board.

    (Original post by plrodham1)
    http://pmj.bmj.com/content/88/1039/249

    Although this is only for OBGYN i assume it to be similar across other post-grad exams.

    Perhaps this will be of interest... (it's the MRCP results by school & PLAB takers; the most recent one)

    http://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g2621

    I believe the way the MRCP is marked means the differences are not very big, but nonetheless, very fascinating.
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    (Original post by hslakaal)
    Perhaps this will be of interest... (it's the MRCP results by school & PLAB takers; the most recent one)

    http://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g2621

    I believe the way the MRCP is marked means the differences are not very big, but nonetheless, very fascinating.
    Interesting! Especially some of the differences between the writtens and the PACES.
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    (Original post by hslakaal)
    I believe the way the MRCP is marked means the differences are not very big, but nonetheless, very fascinating.
    No? I thought the older ones that were organised by pass rate rather than average mark showed huge discrepancies - 90% pass rate at the top end versus 30s% at the lower end. This is similar to the range seen in OBGYN exams. I'd definitely call that big. Huge in fact.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    No? I thought the older ones that were organised by pass rate rather than average mark showed huge discrepancies - 90% pass rate at the top end versus 30s% at the lower end. This is similar to the range seen in OBGYN exams. I'd definitely call that big. Huge in fact.
    I thought the marking methods were changed? I meant the data in that BMJ article. Admittedly I haven't read it very thoroughly but aren't the graphs using zero as the passmark (500-something now right?) and the differences are the average +/- to the scaled pass mark, so Oxford has about 10 scaled marks extra than the pass mark, whilst Liverpool got about 5 scaled marks less than the pass mark? I meant that this difference wasn't very huge if converted to raw marks, it's not a big difference, is it...?

    Man... the above paragraph is quite possibly my least structured writing ever. Let me rewrite it:

    I didn't read the article thoroughly, but I thought the tables showed the differences in the scaled scores, whereby they converted the 500-something pass mark to 0. As such, the average Oxford grad scored 10 more scaled score points than the pass mark, whilst a Liverpool grad scored about 5 less - scores which aren't very significant I'd imagine when converted into raw marks of the 200 questions in Part 1, isn't it? Or am I just horribly misunderstanding the data?
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    No, they're not the same, but not strictly in the classic TSRian sense of prestige and league tables.

    Some schools offer more opportunities for forming a career foundation (in certain specialisms) than others, provide their students with different knowledge-bases, et c., et c.
 
 
 
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