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Why are my laptop disk drives almost full when I don't have anything stored on them? Watch

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    My laptop is coming up to 3 years old now and the other day it blue screened, followed by a message saying 'crash dump' and then it shut down. When I turned it back on it was okay again, but I've been reading around and found out that this problem is likely due to a memory overload?


    The thing is, I deleted everything off my laptop (music, photos, documents, unnecessary programmes) a few months ago and I still keep on getting a notification on the task bar saying that my D disk is almost full - I only have 136mb left out of 165gb. Whilst the C disk has about 43gb left out of 111gb.


    Why is my laptop so full when there is nothing on it, and what can I do about this problem?
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    Are you sure you deleted stuff from the D drive and not the C Drive? (I know that seems like a silly question).
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    Run Disk Cleanup, you've probably got a lot of temporary internet files.

    Also delete system restore points, they're next to useless anyway: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/w...#1TC=windows-7
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    Run Disk Cleanup, you've probably got a lot of temporary internet files.

    Also delete system restore points, they're next to useless anyway: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/w...#1TC=windows-7
    Thank you for your quick reply.

    I went to do that and it says 'you can use Disk Cleanup to free up to 0 bytes of disk space on (D' and when I click the clean up system files button, no difference is made. Same with the restore points - it doesn't make a difference!
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    (Original post by PythianLegume)
    Are you sure you deleted stuff from the D drive and not the C Drive? (I know that seems like a silly question).
    I don't know which disk they were on, all I know is that my laptop now contains none of my personal programmes, photos, music, videos or documents and one disk is more than half full and the other is practically full!
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    (Original post by emilyyou)
    I don't know which disk they were on, all I know is that my laptop now contains none of my personal programmes, photos, music, videos or documents and one disk is more than half full and the other is practically full!
    I suspect that you deleted stuff from the C-Drive. That's normally the hard-drive where documents, music, etc is held. What is your D-Drive? For me, it's the CD-drive. Do you have a CD in your laptop? Or is it a hard-drive in your laptop separate to your C-Drive (which would be odd).

    If you go to (My) Computer and look at the D-Drive, you should be able to tell what kind of drive it is and what's on there.
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    You can download a trusted, safe bit of software called CCleaner

    It allows you to run a cleanup that will delete all unneeded files such as temps and dlls

    It also finds any faults within the PC and tries to fix them

    Here is the official website download

    http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download

    Just get the free version as it's basically the same as the paid :P

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    Just go into those drives and see what is there.
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    I'm going to say now, did you empty your recycle bin? Anything that is in there still contributes to used space, so if you happen to have 50GB of stuff sat in there you have the answer to your problem (More than once I have forgotten about it and been confused as to why I don't have as much space as expected)
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    Download WinDirStat.

    It lists the file sizes of each folder on your drives. Will show which ones are taking the most space. Once you post the sizes on here we might be able to help you further as to what is taking up all the space.

    WinDirStat
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    (Original post by emilyyou)
    My laptop is coming up to 3 years old now and the other day it blue screened, followed by a message saying 'crash dump' and then it shut down. When I turned it back on it was okay again, but I've been reading around and found out that this problem is likely due to a memory overload?


    The thing is, I deleted everything off my laptop (music, photos, documents, unnecessary programmes) a few months ago and I still keep on getting a notification on the task bar saying that my D disk is almost full - I only have 136mb left out of 165gb. Whilst the C disk has about 43gb left out of 111gb.


    Why is my laptop so full when there is nothing on it, and what can I do about this problem?
    You say running the Disk Cleanup Utility says there is nothing to delete? Hmm.
    If you do not manage to find a solution to this by tomorrow then I would be happy to help via remote control.

    Hope you find a solution to your problem.
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    By the way, the bluescreen has nothing to do with running out of disk space. That's a totally different problem.

    They MAY be caused by running out of memory, but that's random access memory (RAM), not HD space.

    Next time you get a blue screen, take a picture of it. It will tell you exactly what's wrong.
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    First of all, the blue screen (AKA BSOD: Blue Screen of Death) was complaining about a lack of memory, not disk space; it is unrelated to the problems you describe about a lack of space on the C and D drives (will cover this). This is because disk space is used to store files in the long term, such as music, photos, videos, programs etc.; whereas memory is a quickly-accessible temporary storage for when these things are open, so they can keep on running. You can think of it in a desk analogy: the disk space is files which are stored in your desk's drawers and the memory are the files you are currently using (reading, writing etc.) on top of your desk.

    Second, don't worry about the memory problem unless it persists another couple of times for now. Sometimes, albeit rarely, it happens without there being a viable problem with your laptop.

    In regard to the current storage problem, I am quite confident in what the situation is. Your laptop appears to have two hard drives (each providing disk space for music etc.) in Computer: the C and D drive. In reality, your laptop will probably have one physical hard drive, but for organisational purposes, the manufacturer has made it appear as two hard drives. This is called disk partitioning. (And I dislike manufacturers doing it; in reality it doesn't benefit the vast majority, but instead confuses them.)

    Referring back to the organisation of the drives, while technically you can (almost) do anything with the files on each drive, many files will be put on one drive by default. Remember all those programs, music, documents etc. that you deleted? They were (again, most likely) on the C drive, not the D drive. This is probably where you were confused, because as you noted, it is the D drive that is short on space, not the C drive.

    So how do you solve this problem? Well it's difficult to say without knowing what is on the D drive. Sure, you could expand the D drive's size, removing some of the C drive's space, since these aren't really separate hard drives (they are partitions which can be changed). Then you will get rid of the space issue. But this might not solve the underlying problem. Why go through a potentially dangerous task (changing partitions) when the D drive contains files which are no use to you anyway i.e. you could delete them? Plus, with the extra space, would the space taken up by a program using the D drive we don't currently know? These are just random but plausible factors.

    Therefore have a nosey at what the D drive actually contains and list some files if their purpose is not obvious. Then the real problem can be solved. Hope this helps, in the very least at understanding the problem.
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    (Original post by KDI)
    First of all, the blue screen (AKA BSOD: Blue Screen of Death) was complaining about a lack of memory, not disk space; it is unrelated to the problems you describe about a lack of space on the C and D drives (will cover this). This is because disk space is used to store files in the long term, such as music, photos, videos, programs etc.; whereas memory is a quickly-accessible temporary storage for when these things are open, so they can keep on running. You can think of it in a desk analogy: the disk space is files which are stored in your desk's drawers and the memory are the files you are currently using (reading, writing etc.) on top of your desk.

    Second, don't worry about the memory problem unless it persists another couple of times for now. Sometimes, albeit rarely, it happens without there being a viable problem with your laptop.

    In regard to the current storage problem, I am quite confident in what the situation is. Your laptop appears to have two hard drives (each providing disk space for music etc.) in Computer: the C and D drive. In reality, your laptop will probably have one physical hard drive, but for organisational purposes, the manufacturer has made it appear as two hard drives. This is called disk partitioning. (And I dislike manufacturers doing it; in reality it doesn't benefit the vast majority, but instead confuses them.)

    Referring back to the organisation of the drives, while technically you can (almost) do anything with the files on each drive, many files will be put on one drive by default. Remember all those programs, music, documents etc. that you deleted? They were (again, most likely) on the C drive, not the D drive. This is probably where you were confused, because as you noted, it is the D drive that is short on space, not the C drive.

    So how do you solve this problem? Well it's difficult to say without knowing what is on the D drive. Sure, you could expand the D drive's size, removing some of the C drive's space, since these aren't really separate hard drives (they are partitions which can be changed). Then you will get rid of the space issue. But this might not solve the underlying problem. Why go through a potentially dangerous task (changing partitions) when the D drive contains files which are no use to you anyway i.e. you could delete them? Plus, with the extra space, would the space taken up by a program using the D drive we don't currently know? These are just random but plausible factors.

    Therefore have a nosey at what the D drive actually contains and list some files if their purpose is not obvious. Then the real problem can be solved. Hope this helps, in the very least at understanding the problem.

    Thank you do everyone who replied, all of your answers helped in one way or another! My computer knowledge is very limited, but I figured out that the D drive was storing all the back-ups from the past few years. I've deleted them now and it's freed a lot of space up. Thank you all once again
 
 
 
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