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    I would like help with my German comprehension.

    I've recently completed my German GCSE exams and wish to continue in A-levels and improve outside of school because I know I would need to be devoted to become fluent in another language . I've already started improving my vocabulary, but ultimately I would need practice with fellow students or native speekers, but I've hit a roadblock; a conversation usually involves asking questions and I barely understand how to form questions. :-P

    What is the syntax of German questions? (Where does the auxiliary verbs, subject and verbs go?) Please provide examples, the more the merrier. I would prefer literal translations as well because German is a logical language therefore knowing it literally will help me better understand later on.

    I am by no means bad at other aspects of the German language, I just am awful in forming questions.
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    I would like help with my German comprehension.

    I've recently completed my German GCSE exams and wish to continue in A-levels and improve outside of school because I know I would need to be devoted to become fluent in another language . I've already started improving my vocabulary, but ultimately I would need practice with fellow students or native speekers, but I've hit a roadblock; a conversation usually involves asking questions and I barely understand how to form questions. :-P

    What is the syntax of German questions? (Where does the auxhillary verbs, subject and verbs go?) Please provide examples, the more the merrier. I would prefer literal translations as well because German is a logical language therefore knowing it literally will help me better understand later on.

    I am by no means bad at other aspects of the German language, I just am awful in forming questions.
    Which aspect of forming questions do you find difficult? It is basically just an inversion of the conjugated verb and the subject of that verb. Example:

    Sprechen Sie Deutsch? (literally: speak you German? with 'sprechen' as the conjugated verb and 'Sie' as the formal address of 'you').

    Another example would be something like: Haben sie Geld? (literally: have they money?)

    Of course, there are also question words, such as:
    Wann - when
    Wo - where (note: this changes sometimes to 'wohin' and 'woher', depending on the context of the sentence).
    Wer - who
    Was - what
    Wie - how
    Warum - why

    These function in exactly the same way as if there was no question word in the sentence, i.e. there is inversion of the conjugated verb and the subject. Everything else goes afterwards.

    Examples:

    Wann hast du Geburtstag? - (Literally: When have you birthday?) When is your birthday?

    Wohin gehen sie? - (Literally: To where do they go?) Where are they going?

    Woher kommst du? - (Literally: From where do you come?) Where do you come from?

    If you want to structure a sentence with more than one verb involved, such as modal verbs, the modal verb always goes to the end of the question, like in any German sentence involving one.

    Example:

    Normal: Du kannst Deutsch sprechen.

    Question: Kannst du Deutsch sprechen?

    The only change here is the inversion.

    Hope this helped!

    EDIT:

    I forgot to mention the past tense :P

    The past tense is pretty much the same kind of sentence structure within a question, the auxiliary verb is conjugated so the inversion takes place, and the past participle goes at the end of the sentence:

    Was hast du gestern gemacht? - (Literally: What have you yesterday done?) What did you do yesterday?
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    (Original post by chloevictoria)
    Which aspect of forming questions do you find difficult? It is basically just an inversion of the conjugated verb and the subject of that verb. Example:

    Sprechen Sie Deutsch? (literally: speak you German? with 'sprechen' as the conjugated verb and 'Sie' as the formal address of 'you').

    Another example would be something like: Haben sie Geld? (literally: have they money?)

    Of course, there are also question words, such as:
    Wann - when
    Wo - where (note: this changes sometimes to 'wohin' and 'woher', depending on the context of the sentence).
    Wer - who
    Was - what
    Wie - how
    Warum - why

    These function in exactly the same way as if there was no question word in the sentence, i.e. there is inversion of the conjugated verb and the subject. Everything else goes afterwards.

    Examples:

    Wann hast du Geburtstag? - (Literally: When have you birthday?) When is your birthday?

    Wohin gehen sie? - (Literally: To where do they go?) Where are they going?

    Woher kommst du? - (Literally: From where do you come?) Where do you come from?

    If you want to structure a sentence with more than one verb involved, such as modal verbs, the modal verb always goes to the end of the question, like in any German sentence involving one.

    Example:

    Normal: Du kannst Deutsch sprechen.

    Question: Kannst du Deutsch sprechen?

    The only change here is the inversion.

    Hope this helped!

    EDIT:

    I forgot to mention the past tense :P

    The past tense is pretty much the same kind of sentence structure within a question, the auxiliary verb is conjugated so the inversion takes place, and the past participle goes at the end of the sentence:

    Was hast du gestern gemacht? - (Literally: What have you yesterday done?) What did you do yesterday?
    Don't forget the questionword separation! I got so incredibly confused in my first week in Germany whenever anyone asked me "Wo kommst du her?"!!!!

    But yeah OP, use this guide! But try to mix it up a bit so you don't learn conditioned responses to questions
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    (Original post by Katie_p)
    Don't forget the questionword separation! I got so incredibly confused in my first week in Germany whenever anyone asked me "Wo kommst du her?"!!!!

    But yeah OP, use this guide! But try to mix it up a bit so you don't learn conditioned responses to questions
    Thanks!! I kept forgetting to add things That is a major one so thanks for mentioning it
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    (Original post by chloevictoria)
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    Thanks, it makes a lot more sense. I'm guessing there's no 'do' like the translation of "Do you speak German?".

    (Original post by Katie_p)
    Don't forget the questionword separation! I got so incredibly confused in my first week in Germany whenever anyone asked me "Wo kommst du her?"
    When does this question separation apply?
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    Thanks, it makes a lot more sense. I'm guessing there's no 'do' like the translation of "Do you speak German?".



    When does this question separation apply?
    Umm....it really depends on the speaker. I'm pretty sure either is acceptable, so if you're posing questions, it's fine to stick to one, but in my experience, most people separate at least "woher" when asking questions - but I'm right in the south of Baden-Württemberg at the moment, and there's a strong local dialect, so it might be a regional thing!
    It's more something to be aware of when engaging in "real" conversation than to use yourself in exams or lessons, but something that wasn't addressed when I was at school and thus confused me when I went into "real life" situations!
    I think any question word that can be separated may be, but it's personal preference, or local practice that dictates whether or not you actually do it - but a native speaker might be able to tell you whether there's a "technically" correct way to do it!
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    Thanks, it makes a lot more sense. I'm guessing there's no 'do' like the translation of "Do you speak German?".
    Yeah, that's right
 
 
 
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