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    Basically, I've set myself a goal of getting into Harvard to study economics. Eventually I want to live and work in NY, were my grandma lives.


    This is the problem
    The only way I can go to Harvard is if I get a scholarship for the tuition and living expenses. I don't think this will too hard to get - total household income is £33000 with a newborn on the way, I work part time.


    BUT I want to be revising for the SATs way early (2/3 years early) and this might be a complete waste of time if I don't get the two scholarships/funds. What should I do?


    Should I just give up and just try and get into Cambridge with LSE as a fall back?


    Also, should I keep playing volleyball? I'm REALLY good for my age, would Harvard remotely care?
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    Wow, how good are you that Cambridge and LSE are your fallbacks?!?

    Can I see your A-level grades, predicted grades, EC activities to see if you have a legitimate chance of getting into Harvard? If so, then go for it!
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    Cambridge isn't a fallback I would just rather go to Harvard for econ. LSE is a fallback because they only care about your grades at application with a A*AA good enough to get you there.
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    (Original post by groovyd97)
    Wow, how good are you that Cambridge and LSE are your fallbacks?!?

    Can I see your A-level grades, predicted grades, EC activities to see if you have a legitimate chance of getting into Harvard? If so, then go for it!
    What kind of EC activities do I need to be doing as an idea. I still have 2 years before application.

    i do read a lot about stocks, economy and finance. Even thought about trading at 16.
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    well generally d of E, ten tors, an extended project on some topic of economics. Be subscribed to decent economics magazines like bloomberg amongst others (just stay from the comments on bloombergs - the people that do are propoganda bots or just really aggressive and judgemental - for the apps anyways).
    Attend literally every university lecture you can get your hands on that's to do with economics, finance or politics.
    Being a debater could be useful or an otherwise appropriate school club - always a good thing.
    Show a more personal passion - theatre, sport, volunteering etc. anything that you truly enjoy doing.
    Do 1 summer school that's somehow related to economics - and then book in a second to use as a personal statement if you can.
    try and get a job at a council? just to show your commitment.
    I'm not sure if learning and trading stocks is worthwhile, but if you want to go for it. But its really not very profitable or useful until you spend 3+ years in the industry and have 4-5 figures of cash to use in order to see a decent return.

    then get A*AA or better and get about 32+ / 36 on most if not every SAT module you do and you'll get in , If i remember correctly SAT's are at the difficulty level of AS level exams, except that its not evaluating what you've learned but how you use it, applying it to questions and being able to show you think independently.

    I think if you did all these things then Harvard is definitely possible you've asked at the right time, since now you can take action!
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    (Original post by tearteto)
    well generally d of E, ten tors, an extended project on some topic of economics. Be subscribed to decent economics magazines like bloomberg amongst others (just stay from the comments on bloombergs - the people that do are propoganda bots or just really aggressive and judgemental - for the apps anyways).
    Attend literally every university lecture you can get your hands on that's to do with economics, finance or politics.
    Being a debater could be useful or an otherwise appropriate school club - always a good thing.
    Show a more personal passion - theatre, sport, volunteering etc. anything that you truly enjoy doing.
    Do 1 summer school that's somehow related to economics - and then book in a second to use as a personal statement if you can.
    try and get a job at a council? just to show your commitment.
    I'm not sure if learning and trading stocks is worthwhile, but if you want to go for it. But its really not very profitable or useful until you spend 3+ years in the industry and have 4-5 figures of cash to use in order to see a decent return.

    then get A*AA or better and get about 32+ / 36 on most if not every SAT module you do and you'll get in , If i remember correctly SAT's are at the difficulty level of AS level exams, except that its not evaluating what you've learned but how you use it, applying it to questions and being able to show you think independently.

    I think if you did all these things then Harvard is definitely possible you've asked at the right time, since now you can take action!
    I play volleyball at a high standard. Should I keep doing that even if it means squeezing my timetable and slightly less study?
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    define high standard? if County or national level then definitely keep it going.
    If there's one thing I've learnt from seeing the IB (I never did it, phew) then there's always time to study. Some how you will make up that time elsewhere. If you really want to get to harvard then you're next two years aren't going to be the most exciting.
    besides why harvard? I thought Stanford was king for business and economics?
    When you get to sixth form, then I would suggest bringing up the Sutton trust scholarship / method of getting to American universities - ask about that, follow it up and take a crack at it. They'll give you further financial support.

    If you truly stand out, then you enter for a massive scholarship - I can't remember what it was called. But it was $250,000 for the entirety of your study. However the chances of getting it are low:
    so far, 4 people in the last three years have successfully applied to American universities, they applied to a mix of stanford, yale harvard and one or two others. All brilliant in their own right. However 2 of those are in harvard. and only one of those got the $250,000 scholarship. It's a huge achievement.
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    (Original post by tearteto)
    define high standard? if County or national level then definitely keep it going.
    If there's one thing I've learnt from seeing the IB (I never did it, phew) then there's always time to study. Some how you will make up that time elsewhere. If you really want to get to harvard then you're next two years aren't going to be the most exciting.
    besides why harvard? I thought Stanford was king for business and economics?
    When you get to sixth form, then I would suggest bringing up the Sutton trust scholarship / method of getting to American universities - ask about that, follow it up and take a crack at it. They'll give you further financial support.

    If you truly stand out, then you enter for a massive scholarship - I can't remember what it was called. But it was $250,000 for the entirety of your study. However the chances of getting it are low:
    so far, 4 people in the last three years have successfully applied to American universities, they applied to a mix of stanford, yale harvard and one or two others. All brilliant in their own right. However 2 of those are in harvard. and only one of those got the $250,000 scholarship. It's a huge achievement.
    Cheers for the tips!
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    (Original post by Wolf11)
    Cambridge isn't a fallback I would just rather go to Harvard for econ. LSE is a fallback because they only care about your grades at application with a A*AA good enough to get you there.
    LSE is not a fallback. If it were, everybody with those grades who applied would get in. Please be reasonable.


    (Original post by Wolf11)
    Basically, I've set myself a goal of getting into Harvard to study economics.
    That is a really bad goal. Over 94% of applicants get rejected from Harvard each year, and I'm sure it's even more for international applicants. Do some research and come up with a well rounded list of universities that could fund you if you were admitted or where you (as an international) would qualify for merit aid. Don't set yourself up for failure.
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    LSE is not a fallback and you're underestimating how truly difficult it is to get into Cambridge. I'd suggest thinking more carefully about your uni choices, especially as it's incredibly difficult to get into Harvard. It's good to have dreams, but you have to be realistic about them. And since you haven't even done A-Levels, so don't even have predicted grades, I don't think you can confidently state that LSE will be your fallback.
 
 
 
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