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Places to go/things to do in Australia Watch

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    It's my 30th birthday in 18 months, and I want to celebrate it by going on a 2-3 week holiday in Australia. I have been before (to Sydney) but was only there for a few days (don't ask), and I want to 'do Australia' properly.

    I want to visit Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Ayers Rock for definite. Can anyone recommend any tourist attractions anywhere in Australia. It's obviously early days, but I want to take the time to plan this holiday properly.

    I'll most likely be travelling alone (out of choice), and don't mind staying in hostels, and generally roughing it while getting around.

    Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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    Start with TripAdvisor. You have picked a lot of cities for the short time you are going so I would recommend a fair bit of planning so you can cram most things in + travelling time to each city.
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    great barrier reef, great ocean road, penguin parade, daintree rainforest
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    I wouldn't spend much time in Perth itself, it's not the most exciting place in the world. But some travel around WA is worth it. Though you might want to consider some of the coast of Queensland instead, depends what interests you more.

    Melbourne is more of a hang out city than great for tourists. I love living in Melbourne but I prefer Sydney are a tourist. Coffee and laneways is Melbourne's big thing. Check out Seven Seeds in North Melbourne, Patrica's in the CDB and Naked Expresso in the CBD. Take the 'I'm free' tour- tip is expected- then go back for more time in the laneways afterwards. It's worth a trip out to Prahran for the main street and market. There's art if that's your thing but otherwise there's not much in the way of tourist stuff to do.


    Sydney, there's endless stuff to do. I'd suggest even staying in a few different places. Like a few nights around the CBD (don't stay in King Cross if you don't want to party with 18 year olds). See the typical tourist attractions, there's a free tour too, climb the bridge, wander the Rocks and Darling Harbour, hang out in New Town, museums depending on interests. Night or two in Manly to hang out at the beach, see the penguins and do the walk to the Spit. Night or two at Bondi to hang out and walk to Coogee, stoping at beaches along the way. It's well worth a few day trip out to the Blue Mountains too, easy to reach by train and amazing whether you've never hiked before or are practically a pro.

    I'm not going to go to Uluru. Personally I'm not very comfortable with how the wishes of Aboriginal people are ignored in the name of white owned tourist businesses.


    But mostly, 3 weeks in a place the size of Australia is nothing. I think you'd be better not trying to see everything because you'll rush it and n ot get a chance to get to know places a bit.
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    (Original post by BKS)
    I wouldn't spend much time in Perth itself, it's not the most exciting place in the world. But some travel around WA is worth it. Though you might want to consider some of the coast of Queensland instead, depends what interests you more.

    Melbourne is more of a hang out city than great for tourists. I love living in Melbourne but I prefer Sydney are a tourist. Coffee and laneways is Melbourne's big thing. Check out Seven Seeds in North Melbourne, Patrica's in the CDB and Naked Expresso in the CBD. Take the 'I'm free' tour- tip is expected- then go back for more time in the laneways afterwards. It's worth a trip out to Prahran for the main street and market. There's art if that's your thing but otherwise there's not much in the way of tourist stuff to do.


    Sydney, there's endless stuff to do. I'd suggest even staying in a few different places. Like a few nights around the CBD (don't stay in King Cross if you don't want to party with 18 year olds). See the typical tourist attractions, there's a free tour too, climb the bridge, wander the Rocks and Darling Harbour, hang out in New Town, museums depending on interests. Night or two in Manly to hang out at the beach, see the penguins and do the walk to the Spit. Night or two at Bondi to hang out and walk to Coogee, stoping at beaches along the way. It's well worth a few day trip out to the Blue Mountains too, easy to reach by train and amazing whether you've never hiked before or are practically a pro.

    I'm not going to go to Uluru. Personally I'm not very comfortable with how the wishes of Aboriginal people are ignored in the name of white owned tourist businesses.


    But mostly, 3 weeks in a place the size of Australia is nothing. I think you'd be better not trying to see everything because you'll rush it and n ot get a chance to get to know places a bit.
    Thank you for the advice.

    Since my OP, I've changed my plan considerably. I'll travel to Sydney, and stay there for about a week to recover from the jet lag and do the touristy stuff.

    Then I'll go to Melbourne, and (after a few days prep time) I'll do the whole AAWT bushwalk, for which I'm planning will take around 6 weeks. I've done plenty of day-hikes and a couple of overnight hikes, but no long term hikes like this.
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    Stick to one part of the country. There's no way you can sensibly combine Perth, Sydney, Melbourne and Ayers Rock, provided you also want to see the stuff in the middle. I myself lived in Australia for almost a year and saw neither the outback, nor Western Australia, South Australia or the Northern Territory.

    Plan 1 - Queensland

    Tropical Queensland is a beautiful part of Australia. You could fly into Brisbane and then make your way up the coast, taking time to explore the Whitsunday Islands (several day boat trip!), see Fraser Island, explore Cairns and, most importantly, Daintree, the oldest rainforest in the world.

    Plan 2 - Southern East Coast

    Fly into Sydney, from there go to Canberra (great museums, nice national parks), then down the coast, stopping at places like Narooma, Lakes Entrance etc. Don't miss Wilson's Promontory, a beautiful national park on the southernmost tip of the continent. From there get to Melbourne, then take the Great Ocean Road to Adelaide.

    Plan 3 - Outback

    Fly into Melbourne, take the Great Ocean Road to Adelaide, from there drive all the way up to Alice Springs (stop by Coober Pedy!) and Uluru.

    or

    Plan 4 - Outback II

    Approach the outback from the north, experiencing tropical Darwin and Kakadu National Park.
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    (Original post by askew116)
    Since my OP, I've changed my plan considerably.
    Should've read that before posting Anyway, sounds much better than the original plan (more time and more in depth). You might also want to explore Canberra.
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    Or don't I thought Canberra was ****ing awful. I don't remember anything I thought was interesting and it's pretty telling that there's only one hostel ( which I suspect us also doing temporary accommodation for older homeless people on the side). People are nice but 3 days there was too long.
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Should've read that before posting Anyway, sounds much better than the original plan (more time and more in depth). You might also want to explore Canberra.
    The advice is appreciated anyway! I realised that my original plan was ludicrous - like trying to see both east and west-coast US in a couple of weeks - possible but unwise.

    I've been into hiking and camping, but have never done more than an overnight camp before, and when I started reading about the AAWT, I decided I have to attempt it. I'll be training long and hard, and also will take sponsorship for charity (THT), so people will get to benefit too
 
 
 
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