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Tips on how to get through scientific journal articles? Watch

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    Ok, so I have recently started studying finance. I find it extremely interesting and judging from what I read in the core textbooks I already have a pretty decent foundation as I seem to be familiar with most of what I read. However, I have just started to advance to scientific journal articles. I have studied Politics & IR before and eventhough scientific articles were more challenging in those subjects too, they didn't have these super complicated mathematical calculations that the finance/economy articles all seem to have. The contrast between reading a textbook and a scientific article is so big. I am going for a 1st and I know that I'll be needing to read a lot of these articles to achieve that. But right now I don't know how to tackle them. So my questions are:

    * How far in to your degree did you start reading scientific articles? (I am only in my first year, maybe I should wait a little until I am more familiar with the subject in general? But at the same time; I feel it is a matter of practise, the more I practise, the better I'll become?)
    * For those who study economics, finance, business etc: How do you deal with all those pages of complicated calculations? Do you try and figure out what they mean or ignore them and just go for the text?
    * How many scientific articles do you read per semester per module?
    * Do you read scientific articles differently from how you read textbook chapters in some way?

    Any tips on how to get through scientific articles would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Ozarc)
    Ok, so I have recently started studying finance. I find it extremely interesting and judging from what I read in the core textbooks I already have a pretty decent foundation as I seem to be familiar with most of what I read. However, I have just started to advance to scientific journal articles. I have studied Politics & IR before and eventhough scientific articles were more challenging in those subjects too, they didn't have these super complicated mathematical calculations that the finance/economy articles all seem to have. The contrast between reading a textbook and a scientific article is so big. I am going for a 1st and I know that I'll be needing to read a lot of these articles to achieve that. But right now I don't know how to tackle them. So my questions are:

    * How far in to your degree did you start reading scientific articles? (I am only in my first year, maybe I should wait a little until I am more familiar with the subject in general? But at the same time; I feel it is a matter of practise, the more I practise, the better I'll become?)
    * For those who study economics, finance, business etc: How do you deal with all those pages of complicated calculations? Do you try and figure out what they mean or ignore them and just go for the text?
    * How many scientific articles do you read per semester per module?
    * Do you read scientific articles differently from how you read textbook chapters in some way?

    Any tips on how to get through scientific articles would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
    Memorise the abstract and write a 500 word summary of the article in a nushell?
 
 
 
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