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    Hi everyone!
    If i correctly understand, is there the age limit for getting training contract in UK ? What is it ? 26, 27,28 + or more ? Is there difference in this question for top firms and middle firms, or firms located in London and other parts of UK ? I'm lawyer in Moscow and recently have thought about law education in UK and probably further work in UK, but i can start education only about 30, and, respectively, arises question about age limit for getting TC. This may not necessarily be the top firms, rather middle firms. Sorry if such thread already there is, but i couldn't find it.
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    One of the trainees in my cohort at a silver circle firm is about 40.

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    There is no actual age limit as this would very likely be found to be direct discrimination - under age discrimination - under the Equality Act here.

    Of course the vast majority of trainees are young but you do get trainees who are older and have had previous careers et. So it does happen.

    There is no actual upper age limit. You might get people jumping on to the thread to say 'that doesn't mean that firms don't discriminate' - this is not what I am saying. I am saying there is no upper age limit.

    Anyway, you're not that old!
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    I think most firms are very open to older applicants. The average age of trainees seems to be getting older anyway, I started my TC at 22 and was very much in the minority. Most of the trainees starting now seem to be in their late 20s or early 30s.

    OP you say you're a lawyer in Moscow, are you sure you need to do a TC? Have you looked at the QLTS?
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    Thanks to all who answered. I've thought differently about it. I've read the blog of one lawyer (he got TC in Linklaters), who from East Europe too, and he wrote that when he got TC he was 27 years old and he was oldest on the flow. (but he wrote about magic circle firms as Link). I've never heard about QLTS, but, probably, i should gain more information about it. My understanding was such that there is only one scheme: LLB (as rule for British) or GDL (rather for foreigners who have another education) and LPC for all. After that - getting TC.
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    (Original post by moar_moar)
    Thanks to all who answered. I've thought differently about it. I've read the blog of one lawyer (he got TC in Linklaters), who from East Europe too, and he wrote that when he got TC he was 27 years old and he was oldest on the flow. (but he wrote about magic circle firms as Link). I've never heard about QLTS, but, probably, i should gain more information about it. My understanding was such that there is only one scheme: LLB (as rule for British) or GDL (rather for foreigners who have another education) and LPC for all. After that - getting TC.
    Are you a qualified lawyer or a law student?
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    It is possible and often advisable to attempt to get a TC before starting the GDL

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    to emmings, i'm qualified lawyer, 27 years. to The Blind Monk, yes i know, but is it also rightly for foreigners too ?
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    The guy in question is a foreign qualified lawyer

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    (Original post by moar_moar)
    to emmings, i'm qualified lawyer, 27 years. to The Blind Monk, yes i know, but is it also rightly for foreigners too ?
    If you are qualified then you may not need to do the GDL/LPC/TC, do some research on the QLTS (qualified lawyer transfer scheme). However it depends on what qualified means in your country and if you have any experience of actually practising as a lawyer and you will still need to find yourself a job which is easier said than done with no English experience - so TC may still be the best route for you, it just depends on your circumstances.
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    Given the intense competition for training contracts, if you are already qualified you would be far better off improving your experience in your legal specialisation, then coming to the UK as a qualified and experienced lawyer.

    Perhaps look at joining one of the UK firms with a presence in Moscow, then moving internally within the firm to the UK after a few years.

    Make sure you work on your English language skills meantime, as fluent English and Russian should be a real selling point for you.
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    Thanks for recommendations! Yes, language skills is very important. I've experience in some legal areas, but i don't think it would be relevant in UK.
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    Corporate law or banking law tends to travel well.
 
 
 
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