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Do GCSE examiners have your predicted grades? Watch

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    I was just wondering...
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    I don't believe so unless you missed an exam in which case the exam board use them to generate an estimated grade. Feel free to re correct me if I'm wrong though!
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    No, the person marking your paper knows nothing except what you write on the paper


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    Why would they? what would they do with them?
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    Examiners mark completely impartially and without bias. Therefore they do not see any personal or academic information: they do not know who you are (not strictly true with physical marking, but examiners do not personally know the candidates who they are marking – there should be internal procedures to stop this from happening – so there's no bias); they do not know your predicted grades; they do not know your life story.

    All the examiner considers is the work that is right in front of them.

    It's not the examiner's job to consider the candidate's situation as a whole; they're simply paid to mark examination papers.
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    (Original post by BULL14)
    I was just wondering...
    They know nothing about you. They are not allowed to mark scripts for centres they have personal knowledge of and the exam board tells them nothing about the candidate - they can't tell if they had extra time though they will be able to tell if they had a word processor or a scribe. If the centre puts in for special consideration for a candidate (e.g. because the student was ill or her mother died just before the exam) then the marker does not know. He/she marks it as normal and then the exam board decides what adjustment to make.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    Why would they? what would they do with them?
    Moulded your results around them so you are not too disappointed (if they had them)


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    Yes, the exam board requires schools to submit predicted grades in advance of the actual exams, but those are not given to the individual markers. They are used in such cases as a candidate being unable to sit an exam suddenly through illness, where the board will calculate a grade based on any work already done and what the school thought they were going to get. It's nothing for you to be concerned about.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Yes, the exam board requires schools to submit predicted grades in advance of the actual exams, but those are not given to the individual markers. They are used in such cases as a candidate being unable to sit an exam suddenly through illness, where the board will calculate a grade based on any work already done and what the school thought they were going to get. It's nothing for you to be concerned about.
    This document http://www.jcq.org.uk/exams-office/a...date-is-absent explains how a mark is decided for a unit where a candidate is absent, but does not mention predicted grades at all and I believe that they no longer use them for this purpose.

    I think I have read somewhere that Edexcel (at least) has a quick check of your paper if you are 2 grades off predicted to check they haven't made a howling error. I have a feeling that they also use the information as a cross check of the suitability of the exam - if the people predicted Es and Fs get a question right but the A* candidates get it wrong then it pays to check the validity of the question.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    This document http://www.jcq.org.uk/exams-office/a...date-is-absent explains how a mark is decided for a unit where a candidate is absent, but does not mention predicted grades at all and I believe that they no longer use them for this purpose.

    I think I have read somewhere that Edexcel (at least) has a quick check of your paper if you are 2 grades off predicted to check they haven't made a howling error. I have a feeling that they also use the information as a cross check of the suitability of the exam - if the people predicted Es and Fs get a question right but the A* candidates get it wrong then it pays to check the validity of the question.
    Yes, that's my understanding as well, although there is some obscurity as to exactly what purpose they serve, tbh. When awarding marks in absence, the board asks for the names (and the coursework, iirc) of the candidates just above and just below the absent candidate on the estimated grades list to check something or other. It's been a few years since I had this happen to one of my students now, so the system may have changed, but what is certain is that the markers themselves have no access to the information.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    When awarding marks in absence, the board asks for the names (and the coursework, iirc) of the candidates just above and just below the absent candidate on the estimated grades list to check something or other. It's been a few years since I had this happen to one of my students now, so the system may have changed,
    They changed the system about 5 year ago.

    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    but what is certain is that the markers themselves have no access to the information.
    Agreed.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    They changed the system about 5 year ago.



    Agreed.
    It's probably longer than that when my student fell ill. Sometimes you don't know what's changed when it no longer affects you. No one seems able to confirm quite what the predicted grades are for, in my department at any rate.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    It's probably longer than that when my student fell ill. Sometimes you don't know what's changed when it no longer affects you. No one seems able to confirm quite what the predicted grades are for, in my department at any rate.
    I agree. It's one of those things I keep meaning to ask and never get around to. If I find out, I'll let you know.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    I agree. It's one of those things I keep meaning to ask and never get around to. If I find out, I'll let you know.
    We all asked and even the academic deputy didn't actually know anymore. It's just one more of those things that we do for no reason.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    We all asked and even the academic deputy didn't actually know anymore. It's just one more of those things that we do for no reason.
    AQA's wbsite (http://www.aqa.org.uk/news-and-polic...how-exams-work) does confirm that they are used in setting grade boundaries as it says (my bold):
    Setting the grade boundaries


    When all the papers have been marked, our senior examiners and subject experts set the grade boundaries for each paper and any controlled assessment or coursework that counts towards the qualification. This process is called awarding.
    During awarding, senior examiners and the subject experts look at:

    • scripts with marks that are close to the grade boundaries from the previous year and the current year - this is to make sure the standard is the same for all students, whichever year they take the exam
    • statistical evidence, for example the performance in earlier tests for all the students who took the exam and the overall results predicted by teachers - this helps guide their judgement.

    After careful consideration, the senior examiners decide what the minimum mark for each grade should be and it goes to Ofqual for approval. We then apply the grade boundaries to each student's marks to produce the grade they will receive.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    AQA's wbsite (http://www.aqa.org.uk/news-and-polic...how-exams-work) does confirm that they are used in setting grade boundaries as it says (my bold):
    Setting the grade boundaries


    When all the papers have been marked, our senior examiners and subject experts set the grade boundaries for each paper and any controlled assessment or coursework that counts towards the qualification. This process is called awarding.
    During awarding, senior examiners and the subject experts look at:

    • scripts with marks that are close to the grade boundaries from the previous year and the current year - this is to make sure the standard is the same for all students, whichever year they take the exam
    • statistical evidence, for example the performance in earlier tests for all the students who took the exam and the overall results predicted by teachers - this helps guide their judgement.

    After careful consideration, the senior examiners decide what the minimum mark for each grade should be and it goes to Ofqual for approval. We then apply the grade boundaries to each student's marks to produce the grade they will receive.
    Yes. Nice and vague. It raises the issue of how these things are done, tactically. As accurately as possible, slightly optimistic or slightly pessimistic. Glad I'm retiring next year and won't have to worry/bother/care anymore.
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    (Original post by Mr...)
    Moulded your results around them so you are not too disappointed (if they had them)


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    Well they don't do that for obvious reasons.
    If this is what they OP was hoping for, sorry.
 
 
 
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