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Doing several unpaid internships for charities - Career advice needed HELP Watch

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    I graduated last year with a bachelor of education degree, first class honours.
    For the last 6 months, I have been doing two unpaid internships at two education charities. At one education charity, I was marketing their education programme to schools. At another education charity, I was coordinating their education programme.

    I am keen on getting a paid job in the charity sector, particularly to do with education charities/programmes. After many applications, I have been unsuccessful in gaining a paid job. I thought my internships would make it easier for me but it doesn't seem like it.

    Now my internships are coming to an end. I can either stay at home and continue applying for jobs or do another internship. I've already got an interview to do an education internship at a museum where I will be helping out with their education programme.

    Would so many internships look bad on my CV? Do you think it is worth it? or would it not make much of a difference?

    Please help. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by bluebell100)
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    Continuing to work in the sector can only strengthen your applications. Get your CV checked out and make sure it is as effective as it can be.
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    If you work and never get paid, you look like a mug and people including those in charities will treat you like it. Get a paid job in anything, it will boost your confidence and obviously get some money in.

    Its a harsh truth but we don't always get what we want. I wanted to become a professor in biochemistry but I am not and never will be. You have to be more flexible and look for other opportunities.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    If you work and never get paid, you look like a mug and people including those in charities will treat you like it.
    This is nonsense. Salary details are usually a private matter between an employee and an employer. You don't mention them in a CV, you don't even have to say the work was voluntary. No-one knows what you were or weren't paid unless you choose to tell them.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    This is nonsense. Salary details are usually a private matter between an employee and an employer. You don't mention them in a CV, you don't even have to say the work was voluntary. No-one knows what you were or weren't paid unless you choose to tell them.
    I assume the OP is doing internships as a career move which means he/she will use them as references when applying for jobs. Prospective employers will want to know the type of job and will also ask about pay since this gives an indication of the job level. They can ask the candidate or the referees.

    You are naive if you think employers are not interested or don't want to know about pay and job type. I certainly did when I was recruiting.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I certainly did when I was recruiting.
    In the education/charity sector? That's the sector I'm in and I've never been asked in any interview, and I've certainly never asked when I've been the interviewer.

    In education, application forms that are also used by teaching staff often ask your salary - you simply ignore the question or put 'market rate' and nothing bad happens, you'll still get to interview.

    To judge people on the basis of a previous salary is naive in the extreme because people take jobs (especially at the moment) for all sorts of professional development/experience reasons. You should be employing people on the basis of their ability to do the job, not what someone else judged to be their market value.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    In the education/charity sector? That's the sector I'm in and I've never been asked in any interview, and I've certainly never asked when I've been the interviewer.

    In education, application forms that are also used by teaching staff often ask your salary - you simply ignore the question or put 'market rate' and nothing bad happens, you'll still get to interview.

    To judge people on the basis of a previous salary is naive in the extreme because people take jobs (especially at the moment) for all sorts of professional development/experience reasons. You should be employing people on the basis of their ability to do the job, not what someone else judged to be their market value.
    Thats news to me, I expect is quite easy for an employer to deduce if someone was an intern.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    In the education/charity sector? That's the sector I'm in and I've never been asked in any interview, and I've certainly never asked when I've been the interviewer.

    In education, application forms that are also used by teaching staff often ask your salary - you simply ignore the question or put 'market rate' and nothing bad happens, you'll still get to interview.

    To judge people on the basis of a previous salary is naive in the extreme because people take jobs (especially at the moment) for all sorts of professional development/experience reasons. You should be employing people on the basis of their ability to do the job, not what someone else judged to be their market value.
    On my CV, do I have to add 'intern' to my job roles?

    e.g. instead of putting 'education intern', put 'education worker' instead?
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    Generally, you should identify that it's an internship. To be honest, it would look a bit odd if you had a series of short-term jobs. Whether you are paid or not is irrelevant for internships when you are applying for jobs.

    In terms of your first question, it is always better to be doing something, and have something on your CV, than to be doing nothing. It may open more doors for you, and it wont stop you applying for full-time jobs. Employers will look more favourably on that than doing nothing.
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    (Original post by bluebell100)
    On my CV, do I have to add 'intern' to my job roles?

    e.g. instead of putting 'education intern', put 'education worker' instead?
    You have to put some title that isn't misleading, but it doesn't have to be the exact title you used in the role viz the ridiculous 'crew member' at McDonalds. However, there is nothing wrong with Intern, because it explains the short term appointments - but being an intern doesn't mean you weren't paid.
 
 
 
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