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    If I were to study Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry for AS/A-levels, would I be able to get into a Russell group university to study medicine?
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    You would have many more options if you took Biology instead of FM, but there are few you can apply to. Why limit your options so drastically? Plus many med schools don't accept FM as an A2, so you would have to drop it anyway or take 4 A2's.
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    (Original post by HCubed)
    You would have many more options if you took Biology instead of FM, but there are few you can apply to. Why limit your options so drastically? Plus many med schools don't accept FM as an A2, so you would have to drop it anyway or take 4 A2's.

    Thankyou! And I was trying to keep my options as open as possible as I haven't yet decided whether I would prefer to study Maths or Medicine. Would it be particularly advantageous if I studied Biology at AS, as well as the other four? Or would I have to continue it to A2?
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    If I were to study Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry for AS/A-levels, would I be able to get into a Russell group university to study medicine?
    Take a look at the FAQ: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...Guide_and_FAQs

    What subjects do I need to take?
    At GCSE you should aim to take a breadth of academic subjects. The subjects which are most important for medical school are Biology, Chemistry, Physics (or the Double Science award), Mathematics and English Language.

    At AS Level you should aim to take Chemistry, Biology and two other academic subjects. You do not need Mathematics to study medicine. Further Maths is usually not counted as an additional qualification alongside Mathematics. It is not advisable to study more than the standard four subjects as this will put strain on your ability to study effectively, and there is currently absolutely no benefit in having studied more.

    At A2 Level you should aim to drop one subject at AS, and carry on three. You should continue Chemistry, Biology and one other academic subject. Again, you do not need Mathematics to study medicine. There is no need for the third A2 to be in a science subject, however certain medical schools do have a requirement for three sciences. A significant proportion of medical schools accept a third non-science A2. A small minority of medical schools give a slight preference to applicants who have studied a third, contrasting (non-science) subject at A2. Do not study more than the standard three A2 - you will put strain on yourself and this may cause you to drop a grade and thus miss your medicine offer. There is no advantage to studying more than the standard three.

    You can discuss what subjects to take on the TSR Medicine forum "What should I take?" thread, click here for more information.
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    Thankyou! Would it be enough to study Biology for AS only?
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Thankyou! Would it be enough to study Biology for AS only?
    For some medical schools yeh, see specific requirements for each: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...l_Requirements
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Thankyou! Would it be enough to study Biology for AS only?
    It'll open up a couple of med schools but you'll still be limited.

    Bio, chem, maths, and f maths would give you more options whilst not compromising a maths application. With the sciences taking 5 ASs is a possibility too though you need to be cautious. I took those 5AS (and all at A2 as it happens) and was torn between medicine and maths for a long time. I found that workload manageable but its not for everyone. AAAA is much better than AABBB.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    It'll open up a couple of med schools but you'll still be limited.

    Bio, chem, maths, and f maths would give you more options whilst not compromising a maths application. With the sciences taking 5 ASs is a possibility too though you need to be cautious. I took those 5AS (and all at A2 as it happens) and was torn between medicine and maths for a long time. I found that workload manageable but its not for everyone. AAAA is much better than AABBB.

    Thankyou! If you don't mind saying, what were your end grades and did you choose maths or medicine in the end?
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Thankyou! If you don't mind saying, what were your end grades and did you choose maths or medicine in the end?
    I got 5As (it was in the days before A*s). I chose medicine, and was very glad for it tbh - putting the medical career aside for a second, maths is so prevalent within uni-level chemistry and physics that in hindsight those should very much have been my second choice, not pure maths which is highly conceptual and all proof-based.
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    I would definitely take up biology at least at AS level, you never know - it might grow on you.
    TBH i know people in the year above who've been told to take AS/ALevel biology as a condition of their offer, so it might make your life easier if you start off with it
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    If I were to study Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry for AS/A-levels, would I be able to get into a Russell group university to study medicine?
    Why do you specifically want to go to a russell group university for medicine.
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    (Original post by alevelzzz)
    Why do you specifically want to go to a russell group university for medicine.
    Predominately because medicine is very competitive and they vastly raise the likelihood of employment, but also they often have advanced facilities, beautiful campuses -I'd prefer to go to a campus university - and, I'm told, better teaching/teachers.
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Predominately because medicine is very competitive and they vastly raise the likelihood of employment, but also they often have advanced facilities, beautiful campuses -I'd prefer to go to a campus university - and, I'm told, better teaching/teachers.
    I go to a Russell Group medical school. But I can tell you that it doesn't raise job prospects remotely. When you're applying for your job, employers don't know what uni you go to (nor do they care). Medicine is competitive to get in, but from what I have seen, most people are quite happy with their jobs at the end of it, regardless of where they go.

    Southampton (my uni and Russell Group) is not strictly a campus uni. We have many campuses, halls are off site, and our med school is split between 2 sites. That said Highfield is beautiful. But you're making big generalisations.


    Medicine is really hard to get in. If you limit yourself to Russell Group then your chances are going to be reduced. You need to apply to the unis that favour your strengths rather than simply any perceived prestige.




    All of that said I am at Southampton and I love it so what the hell can I say!
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Predominately because medicine is very competitive and they vastly raise the likelihood of employment, but also they often have advanced facilities, beautiful campuses -I'd prefer to go to a campus university - and, I'm told, better teaching/teachers.
    No they don't.

    I can't even remember which medical schools are RG and which aren't. They will all make you a competent doctor. Don't limit your options based on some arbitrary list which bears minimal relation to the quality of medical education available.
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    (Original post by Lucy_Rebecca)
    Predominately because medicine is very competitive and they vastly raise the likelihood of employment, but also they often have advanced facilities, beautiful campuses -I'd prefer to go to a campus university - and, I'm told, better teaching/teachers.
    student numbers for med/dent/vet are controlled by the government to match the demand. Its very unlikely to be unemployed and when you apply for a training place your university isnt even listed.
    For medicine/dentistry, often the newer universities have better/newer facilities. They also have patient contact earlier on.

    TLDR; you have no clue what you're talking about.
 
 
 
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