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    I don't know which course to do between physiotherapy and sport and exercise. I already know pro's and cons of each course. Pro's of physio is that the course is funded by the NHS and is therefore free. You also basically have a ready made job when you complete your degree by going straight into the NHS. Con's are that for me, I don't mind hospital work but it s not ideal for me. On the other hand, Pro's for Sport science is that I know it will be the most enjoyable degree I could ever do because I love sport and the biological science behind it, but a Con is that there aren't that many job prospects as many people take the course and it's hard to get to the top (e.g. Pro football clubs). One last thing that puts me off is that it's easy for BTEC students to do sport science with not fantastic grades which will make me question if I took the harder route than BTEC students ( I do A-levels) to get to the same stage to do Sport science.
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    Can someone please reply.
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    I'd suggest you do sports science. That way, you'll be doing something you actually enjoy and if you get into a good uni and do a placement/work experience/internship you'll be able to compete for the top positions. (Totally not biased )
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    (Original post by TheDaylighter)
    I'd suggest you do sports science. That way, you'll be doing something you actually enjoy and if you get into a good uni and do a placement/work experience/internship you'll be able to compete for the top positions. (Totally not biased )
    Thank you very much for replying! And is that actually true? If you got to a good uni with a good placement u compete with the top positions?


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Thank you very much for replying! And is that actually true? If you got to a good uni with a good placement u compete with the top positions?


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    Well, if you have a good degree and some relevant experience, you're in a better position than someone who has a degree but has no experience
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    (Original post by TheDaylighter)
    Well, if you have a good degree and some relevant experience, you're in a better position than someone who has a degree but has no experience
    Ah I see. Have u done either one of them degrees? (Physio & Sport Science)


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Ah I see. Have u done either one of them degrees? (Physio & Sport Science)


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    Nope, haven't even started a-levels yet

    I had the same sports science vs. physio thing when I was deciding what I wanted to do though.
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    (Original post by TheDaylighter)
    Nope, haven't even started a-levels yet

    I had the same sports science vs. physio thing when I was deciding what I wanted to do though.
    Ah I see. I'm in first year a levels. Anything you need to know? And what did u decide to choose?


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Ah I see. I'm in first year a levels. Anything you need to know? And what did u decide to choose?


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    I was pretty sure I was gonna do sports science but now I'm unsure between that and electronic engineering.
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    (Original post by LewisC)
    I don't know which course to do between physiotherapy and sport and exercise. I already know pro's and cons of each course. Pro's of physio is that the course is funded by the NHS and is therefore free. You also basically have a ready made job when you complete your degree by going straight into the NHS. Con's are that for me, I don't mind hospital work but it s not ideal for me. On the other hand, Pro's for Sport science is that I know it will be the most enjoyable degree I could ever do because I love sport and the biological science behind it, but a Con is that there aren't that many job prospects as many people take the course and it's hard to get to the top (e.g. Pro football clubs). One last thing that puts me off is that it's easy for BTEC students to do sport science with not fantastic grades which will make me question if I took the harder route than BTEC students ( I do A-levels) to get to the same stage to do Sport science.
    Don't listen to the other guy, do physiotherapy. A sports science degree is going to get you about 13k a year if you're lucky, while a physio will start on a guaranteed 21k with a guaranteed job. A physiotherapy degree is packed with biological science, will have you help hundreds of people and make a big difference to their lives and you don't have to work in a hospital. There are community physiotherapists who go to people's houses and treat them in their own homes. There are physiotherapists who work in clinics not attached to hospitals, some are in dedicated rehab facilities, care homes, etc.

    You can play sport in your personal time by joining clubs and societies at uni. You do not want to come out of uni with a 27k debt for tuition fees with a degree which will struggle to get you employed anywhere, with rubbish money if you're lucky enough to get a job. The NHS will pay your tuition fees and give you a non-repayable bursary so you don't have to take out as much student loan for living costs. Sports science graduates are a dime a dozen and you'll be in a sea of unemployed graduates with bleak prospects.
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    I would do physiotherapy. I was in a similar position to you I suppose. I did a Sports Science BTEC and wished to either become a physiotherapist or nutritionalist. I don't really believe there is much money in Sports Science at degree level or above, whilst physiotherapy would grant you access to a specific profession that is well regarded. The SS degree isn't all that well regarded, though definitely not 'Mickey Mouse', it does definitely have a lot of heavy stuff in there; such as sports medicine etc. as well as lots of transferable skills.

    Always follow your interests; but make sure you don't come to a 'dead end' due to your decisions. IMO with SS you will end up relying on contacts much more to find a reasonable/good job. That said, you could always become a sports teacher or something similar.

    I liked sports psychology, so chose to exit SS and do straight psychology; now going on to do cognitive neuroscience (using the biology components from SS and past education).

    Personally, regarding the difficulty of a degree, you will cope with the first year fine - I wouldn't worry.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Don't listen to the other guy, do physiotherapy. A sports science degree is going to get you about 13k a year if you're lucky, while a physio will start on a guaranteed 21k with a guaranteed job. A physiotherapy degree is packed with biological science, will have you help hundreds of people and make a big difference to their lives and you don't have to work in a hospital. There are community physiotherapists who go to people's houses and treat them in their own homes. There are physiotherapists who work in clinics not attached to hospitals, some are in dedicated rehab facilities, care homes, etc.

    You can play sport in your personal time by joining clubs and societies at uni. You do not want to come out of uni with a 27k debt for tuition fees with a degree which will struggle to get you employed anywhere, with rubbish money if you're lucky enough to get a job. The NHS will pay your tuition fees and give you a non-repayable bursary so you don't have to take out as much student loan for living costs. Sports science graduates are a dime a dozen and you'll be in a sea of unemployed graduates with bleak prospects.
    Thank you so much sir! I think uve helped make my decision. You're totally right. Are u studying a levels or doing a degree or what, may I ask?


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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I would do physiotherapy. I was in a similar position to you I suppose. I did a Sports Science BTEC and wished to either become a physiotherapist or nutritionalist. I don't really believe there is much money in Sports Science at degree level or above, whilst physiotherapy would grant you access to a specific profession that is well regarded. The SS degree isn't all that well regarded, though definitely not 'Mickey Mouse', it does definitely have a lot of heavy stuff in there; such as sports medicine etc. as well as lots of transferable skills.

    Always follow your interests; but make sure you don't come to a 'dead end' due to your decisions. IMO with SS you will end up relying on contacts much more to find a reasonable/good job. That said, you could always become a sports teacher or something similar.

    I liked sports psychology, so chose to exit SS and do straight psychology; now going on to do cognitive neuroscience (using the biology components from SS and past education).

    Personally, regarding the difficulty of a degree, you will cope with the first year fine - I wouldn't worry.
    Thank you so much! U have helped make a tough decision! Think I'm going with physiotherapy. That sounds interesting! Good luck in the future 😁


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    Oops, ignore my advice, it was based on doing what you find interesting but I didn't realise the graduate prospects for sports science were that bad. Sorry
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    (Original post by TheDaylighter)
    Oops, ignore my advice, it was based on doing what you find interesting but I didn't realise the graduate prospects for sports science were that bad. Sorry
    No problem. Thanks for your advice


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Thank you so much sir! I think uve helped make my decision. You're totally right. Are u studying a levels or doing a degree or what, may I ask?


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    I've finished my AS levels and I'm going to apply for nursing. I have a friend who's a student nurse who's worked with physiotherapists in their placements, in hospitals, the community, etc. The work the physiotherapists do is amazing and it's really valued by the patients and the general public. Physios will never be out of a job and there's massive scope for promotion and professional development.

    Physiotherapists and nurses start at point 16 on here: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/working...nge-pay-rates/ and will never earn below that when working full-time. There will usually be the chance to take extra shifts when you've worked for a few months and it will all add up. As the years go by you work up the pay-scale, and after a few years you can apply for band 6 (more senior) positions, bypassing the bits of the previous band you didn't get to and you'll never be paid less if you get to band 6 or 7 as they have to pay you from at least where you left the last band.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    I've finished my AS levels and I'm going to apply for nursing. I have a friend who's a student nurse who's worked with physiotherapists in their placements, in hospitals, the community, etc. The work the physiotherapists do is amazing and it's really valued by the patients and the general public. Physios will never be out of a job and there's massive scope for promotion and professional development.

    Physiotherapists and nurses start at point 16 on here: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/working...nge-pay-rates/ and will never earn below that when working full-time. There will usually be the chance to take extra shifts when you've worked for a few months and it will all add up. As the years go by you work up the pay-scale, and after a few years you can apply for band 6 (more senior) positions, bypassing the bits of the previous band you didn't get to and you'll never be paid less if you get to band 6 or 7 as they have to pay you from at least where you left the last band.
    Thank you for your help. I've now made up my mind but I'm free to take in extra information you may have about physiotherapy. Thank you for your helpful advice and information, much appreciated. I'm planning of doing a few years in the NHS to gain more experience then do a part time masters in Sport Physiotherapy whilst I'm still working.


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    Anyone else that can help me???


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    Go for physiotherapy. I currently a physiotherapy student and I can honestly say I'm enjoying every minute. It's hard work, don't get me wrong... You will spend a lot of your free time revising and reading research; so your university experience will be effected in terms of social freedom but apart from that it's a fantastic course and has amazing opportunities!

    If you need anymore information, just let me know.


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    (Original post by $hadow)
    Go for physiotherapy. I currently a physiotherapy student and I can honestly say I'm enjoying every minute. It's hard work, don't get me wrong... You will spend a lot of your free time revising and reading research; so your university experience will be effected in terms of social freedom but apart from that it's a fantastic course and has amazing opportunities!

    If you need anymore information, just let me know.


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    Thanks for getting back to me. That's sounds interesting. What uni do you go to? What year? How you finding social life? And can u explain the bursary/student loan stuff to me please? Thanks 😀


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