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    I personally want to do english lit, philosophy, psychology and government & politics.

    But I wont be allowed to take psychology (probably) because I'm sure I haven't got a B in maths and core science.

    So, I replaced psychology with sociology which I did for GCSE. I found 2/3 exams quite easy after some revision, however I didn't exactly enjoy the subject throughout the two years. Looking back it's a 'meh' sorta subject but I have nothing else to really turn to and I guess summing it up, it was okay.

    Anyway, now I'm reading how I shouldn't mix english lit with sociology because of the work overload.

    I already knew that every subject i've picked is essay-based but will it really be so bad? Is my combination going to make my life a living hell?! I don't know what to expect at all!

    So then I'm reading how universities love their traditional subjects and I'm wondering.. should I replace sociology with history which I also took for GCSE which I found a bumpy sorta subject. I enjoyed the cold war but hated nazi germany and the exams were hard.

    I really can't stand maths and science, please don't recommend it.
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    I have o my done Philosophy out of your chosen subjects, however I do know of people who did both English and sociology; and she managed it okay. Although, she's a real hard worker, so it's all about you personally and how much you can take on. And remember you get to drop a subject after AS, so your workload won't be too overwhelming with just 3 subjects.
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    (Original post by SharpenedPencils)
    I have o my done Philosophy out of your chosen subjects, however I do know of people who did both English and sociology; and she managed it okay. Although, she's a real hard worker, so it's all about you personally and how much you can take on. And remember you get to drop a subject after AS, so your workload won't be too overwhelming with just 3 subjects.
    Did you enjoy philosophy? what do you learn? thanks for your help


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    (Original post by moecandy)
    I personally want to do english lit, philosophy, psychology and government & politics.

    But I wont be allowed to take psychology (probably) because I'm sure I haven't got a B in maths and core science.

    So, I replaced psychology with sociology which I did for GCSE. I found 2/3 exams quite easy after some revision, however I didn't exactly enjoy the subject throughout the two years. Looking back it's a 'meh' sorta subject but I have nothing else to really turn to and I guess summing it up, it was okay.

    Anyway, now I'm reading how I shouldn't mix english lit with sociology because of the work overload.

    I already knew that every subject i've picked is essay-based but will it really be so bad? Is my combination going to make my life a living hell?! I don't know what to expect at all!

    So then I'm reading how universities love their traditional subjects and I'm wondering.. should I replace sociology with history which I also took for GCSE which I found a bumpy sorta subject. I enjoyed the cold war but hated nazi germany and the exams were hard.

    I really can't stand maths and science, please don't recommend it.
    Ok, so first off, DON'T TAKE A 'MEH' SUBJECT AT A-LEVEL THAT YOU WONT ENJOY JUST BECAUSE YOU WANT A FOURTH SUBJECT. A-Level's are a lot harder than GCSEs and take up a lot more time and require a lot more commitment and work. Therefore it's extremely important you do subjects that you enjoy and will want to put all the time and effort into.

    Second, the essay based subjects. For A-Level I studied, Religious Studies (2 different modules/classes (Ethics and Luke's Gospel), basically felt like it was two subjects rather than one), History and English Literature. Three very much essay based subject, but three subjects I have a real interest in and really enjoyed studying. I'm not going to lie to you, its A LOT of work and took up a lot of my time, I had very little of a social life because of the workload from the subjects but I still managed to have somewhat of a social life and do things I liked to do by planning my time.
    No, doing essay based subjects isn't really bad, if its your kind of subjects that you will do well in, then its GOOD for you personally.
    It wont make your life hell if you realise early on that you will have a heavy work load and if you plan your time right, ie. what you are going to do when and how much you will do when.

    I hope this helped. I'll do my best to answer any other questions you have if you ask
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    (Original post by Sarao)
    Ok, so first off, DON'T TAKE A 'MEH' SUBJECT AT A-LEVEL THAT YOU WONT ENJOY JUST BECAUSE YOU WANT A FOURTH SUBJECT. A-Level's are a lot harder than GCSEs and take up a lot more time and require a lot more commitment and work. Therefore it's extremely important you do subjects that you enjoy and will want to put all the time and effort into.

    Second, the essay based subjects. For A-Level I studied, Religious Studies (2 different modules/classes (Ethics and Luke's Gospel), basically felt like it was two subjects rather than one), History and English Literature. Three very much essay based subject, but three subjects I have a real interest in and really enjoyed studying. I'm not going to lie to you, its A LOT of work and took up a lot of my time, I had very little of a social life because of the workload from the subjects but I still managed to have somewhat of a social life and do things I liked to do by planning my time.
    No, doing essay based subjects isn't really bad, if its your kind of subjects that you will do well in, then its GOOD for you personally.
    It wont make your life hell if you realise early on that you will have a heavy work load and if you plan your time right, ie. what you are going to do when and how much you will do when.

    I hope this helped. I'll do my best to answer any other questions you have if you ask
    Thanks for your answer. The reason I have been considering sociology is because I'm thinking that if I take it for a-level I may change my mind about it and come to enjoy it. This is because I hated history growing up but started to actually enjoy it at GCSE, and I'm wondering if this could happen again because I'm quite a flexible person and it doesn't take too much for something to change my mind.

    Anyway, a fourth subject is necessary at my sixth form college, I have also thought about history but although I started enjoying it, the exams were extremely hard for me and I don't know if I can handle that at a-level. If you can, please tell me more about history and english lit, thanks


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    (Original post by moecandy)
    I personally want to do english lit, philosophy, psychology and government & politics.

    But I wont be allowed to take psychology (probably) because I'm sure I haven't got a B in maths and core science.

    So, I replaced psychology with sociology which I did for GCSE. I found 2/3 exams quite easy after some revision, however I didn't exactly enjoy the subject throughout the two years. Looking back it's a 'meh' sorta subject but I have nothing else to really turn to and I guess summing it up, it was okay.

    Anyway, now I'm reading how I shouldn't mix english lit with sociology because of the work overload.

    I already knew that every subject i've picked is essay-based but will it really be so bad? Is my combination going to make my life a living hell?! I don't know what to expect at all!

    So then I'm reading how universities love their traditional subjects and I'm wondering.. should I replace sociology with history which I also took for GCSE which I found a bumpy sorta subject. I enjoyed the cold war but hated nazi germany and the exams were hard.

    I really can't stand maths and science, please don't recommend it.
    If you really want to take Psychology then I suggest talking to the teacher about it and letting them know that you're really passionate about it (if you are and aren't just taking it because you need four subject) and how you'll work hard. I know a few people at my sixth form who have done this for various subject where the missed the requirements and the teacher allowed them to take the subject.

    With regards to all essay based subjects, no it won't be bad. In fact it's good because you'll be constantly refining essays writing skills which is relent to all you're subjects and will make you improve. IE writing essays for English will make you write better essays for psychology and so on and so forth.

    Honestly I would not recommend taking a subject just because universities "love" it. Yes while some subjects are respected more than others it's better to go for ones that you enjoy because you'll do well in them. They'd prefer an A in Sociology than a C in History. I really wish I took this advise when I chose my subjects, I picked Biology despite hating it with a passion just because I did well at GCSE and it was respected. I was kicked out of the subject withing 2 months after constantly getting U's in the practice papers. So I only ended up doing 3 AS levels and was forced into taking those 3 at A level when there was one I would have liked to drop.
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    (Original post by moecandy)
    Thanks for your answer. The reason I have been considering sociology is because I'm thinking that if I take it for a-level I may change my mind about it and come to enjoy it. This is because I hated history growing up but started to actually enjoy it at GCSE, and I'm wondering if this could happen again because I'm quite a flexible person and it doesn't take too much for something to change my mind.

    Anyway, a fourth subject is necessary at my sixth form college, I have also thought about history but although I started enjoying it, the exams were extremely hard for me and I don't know if I can handle that at a-level. If you can, please tell me more about history and english lit, thanks


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    Yes of course

    Well to start off my history exam board was CCEA which from my knowledge isn't really used that much outside of Northern Ireland, in saying that though, from what I have heard from others study different exam boards, the work load doesn't differ between exam boards.
    History is one of those subjects where you really need to have a genuine interest just to tolerate it. You will need to be constantly reading and making notes from all different sources, you can't just depend on one text book. Also, historiography (historical interpretations) takes up a large portion of the marks at A2, so you have to be willing to read around to find relevant quotation and interpretations, and learn them so that you have a few to apply to any question that may come up. Furthermore, a significant amount is on analysing sources, so you have to do a lot of past papers under exam conditions to be able to be familiar of how to analyse an unfamiliar source effectively.
    It's a good and interesting subject to study, just be prepared for the unprecedented work load.

    As for English Lit, I done AQA English Lit B. It was a brilliant spec and it was the only subject I didn't get utterly fed up with at any point. The good thing about A-level English Lit as opposed to GCSE is that it allows a lot more for you to form your own opinions and write about them, nothing is ever ever wrong unless you can't back it up with contextual evidence.
    However a down point for me is that AQA are really really harsh markers for my particular spec.
    English Lit, like history also demands a lot of extra reading, not just your novels, but also articles from things such as the English Review and critical views from different scholars and authors.

    I think I've mentioned everything I can haha But if you have anymore questions feel free to ask
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    (Original post by Chlomc)
    If you really want to take Psychology then I suggest talking to the teacher about it and letting them know that you're really passionate about it (if you are and aren't just taking it because you need four subject) and how you'll work hard. I know a few people at my sixth form who have done this for various subject where the missed the requirements and the teacher allowed them to take the subject.

    With regards to all essay based subjects, no it won't be bad. In fact it's good because you'll be constantly refining essays writing skills which is relent to all you're subjects and will make you improve. IE writing essays for English will make you write better essays for psychology and so on and so forth.

    Honestly I would not recommend taking a subject just because universities "love" it. Yes while some subjects are respected more than others it's better to go for ones that you enjoy because you'll do well in them. They'd prefer an A in Sociology than a C in History. I really wish I took this advise when I chose my subjects, I picked Biology despite hating it with a passion just because I did well at GCSE and it was respected. I was kicked out of the subject withing 2 months after constantly getting U's in the practice papers. So I only ended up doing 3 AS levels and was forced into taking those 3 at A level when there was one I would have liked to drop.
    Thank you. The problem is, I know I won't be getting a b in both maths and science, and that is what is required for psychology. I already spoke to one teacher at my school who is in charge of subjects, about if it was a problem that i was only doing core science (because i failed it last year), she said it was fine as long as I got a b in core science and that that was a must. Also, I will be asking if they can let me off with philosophy because I wont be getting the required b in maths so it will be like asking for waaay too much favours and I don't like to think about the expectations they'll have on me if they allow me to take those because it will be as if I've promised a good level.


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    (Original post by Sarao)
    Yes of course

    Well to start off my history exam board was CCEA which from my knowledge isn't really used that much outside of Northern Ireland, in saying that though, from what I have heard from others study different exam boards, the work load doesn't differ between exam boards.
    History is one of those subjects where you really need to have a genuine interest just to tolerate it. You will need to be constantly reading and making notes from all different sources, you can't just depend on one text book. Also, historiography (historical interpretations) takes up a large portion of the marks at A2, so you have to be willing to read around to find relevant quotation and interpretations, and learn them so that you have a few to apply to any question that may come up. Furthermore, a significant amount is on analysing sources, so you have to do a lot of past papers under exam conditions to be able to be familiar of how to analyse an unfamiliar source effectively.
    It's a good and interesting subject to study, just be prepared for the unprecedented work load.

    As for English Lit, I done AQA English Lit B. It was a brilliant spec and it was the only subject I didn't get utterly fed up with at any point. The good thing about A-level English Lit as opposed to GCSE is that it allows a lot more for you to form your own opinions and write about them, nothing is ever ever wrong unless you can't back it up with contextual evidence.
    However a down point for me is that AQA are really really harsh markers for my particular spec.
    English Lit, like history also demands a lot of extra reading, not just your novels, but also articles from things such as the English Review and critical views from different scholars and authors.

    I think I've mentioned everything I can haha But if you have anymore questions feel free to ask
    Thanks for your help I'm positive about english literature, will have to think some more about history.


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