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    So I've just done my GCSEs and I expect to get mainly As and A*s (as a guide, I got 7 A*s and 1 A in the mocks but I am doing 13 GCSEs for the real ones which is a lot harder). I have applied to Tiffin Girls' school in Greater London, and would take Maths, History, Economics and English Literature at AS. I have the option of taking Further Maths and have also applied for that. I'm just wondering if I should do it or stick to the regular 4 AS. I am expecting A* maths gcse and I regularly get about 98% in mock exams and also did FMSQ. I would like to apply to read law at Oxbridge so Further Maths isn't needed, but I also might consider Economics instead. Also, I think the exam would have the whole maths A level course taken in the first year and then further maths in the second year. Would it be too much unnecessary work? Thanks
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    If you're considering an economics degree, you are not going to get into Oxford or Cambridge when they ask you at interview why you didn't bother to take one of the most important subjects for the degree. That is if they even bother to look at your application, knowing you had the opportunity to take a key subject but didn't, which they most probably won't.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    If you're considering an economics degree, you are not going to get into Oxford and Cambridge when they ask you at interview why you didn't bother to take one of the most important subjects for the degree. That is if they even bother to look at your application, knowing you had the opportunity to take a key subject but didn't, which they most probably won't.
    I am too sure because at my college you couldn't take Maths,Further Maths and Economics.Since OP is considering Law primarily I don't think Further Maths would be a good option and since OP is considering Economics but are not too sure experiencing Economics at A Level would be a good idea I think.
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    I did desperately want to do further maths, and in another application I applied for just maths, further maths, history and economics. I wanted to stick to 4 AS but the catch with Tiffin is that Further Maths doesn't count as an "option" so would just be an add on and extra work. I am leaning towards law anyway, but I would like to keep my options open
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I am too sure because at my college you couldn't take Maths,Further Maths and Economics.Since OP is considering Law primarily I don't think Further Maths would be a good option and since OP is considering Economics but are not too sure experiencing Economics at A Level would be a good idea I think.
    Further maths is better than economics at A-level for an economics degree. LSE demand further maths, Oxford make no reference to A-level economics in their requirements and Cambridge list it as 'useful', but would prefer further maths if it has to be one or the other. The skills taught in A-level economics can be taught in subjects like English literature and history, whereas the maths in the economics degrees is so demanding that further maths really is essential for these universities.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Further maths is better than economics at A-level for an economics degree. LSE demand further maths, Oxford make no reference to A-level economics in their requirements and Cambridge list it as 'useful', but would prefer further maths if it has to be one or the other. The skills taught in A-level economics can be taught in subjects like English literature and history, whereas the maths in the economics degrees is so demanding that further maths really is essential for these universities.
    Further Maths can often be picked up as an AS in the 2nd year if OP decides to do Economics.At my college you are only allowed to do 3 AS generally unless you get an average of A grade and do 4 like me so 5 is obviously a lot of work when OP could focus on those 4 subjects.Further Maths isn't essential for Economics at LSE and if taken would mean you would have to take 4 A-Levels which is a lot of work load.Source:http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/undergrad..._BSc_Econ.aspx
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Further Maths can often be picked up as an AS in the 2nd year if OP decides to do Economics.
    It's still not going to look good, because they could have done even more maths but declined the chance. There will be thousands of other applicants with A2 further maths.
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    Do further maths just in case. If you're good at maths, which it sounds like you are, then you'll be fine!
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    i did further maths and to be honest the hardest part of further-maths for me was the Further pure 2&3 modules.
    revising for these 2 took me the same amount of time i spent on all the other modules i had combined (13 in total).
    should you do it ? if you like maths and are very quick at pattern matching ( which is the majority of FP2) then yes.
    Is it worth it ? definitely , when you apply to Unis it most likely gets you a place.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Further Maths can often be picked up as an AS in the 2nd year if OP decides to do Economics.At my college you are only allowed to do 3 AS generally unless you get an average of A grade and do 4 like me so 5 is obviously a lot of work when OP could focus on those 4 subjects.Further Maths isn't essential for Economics at LSE and if taken would mean you would have to take 4 A-Levels which is a lot of work load.Source:http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/undergrad..._BSc_Econ.aspx
    It's strongly preferred for a reason. I did the same amount of work as OP (5 AS, 4 A2 w/ M&FM) and here I am encouraging them to do the same. If OP can math then M&FM won't drag them down. I'm actually surprised that there are colleges that don't let their students begin with 4 AS levels.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Further Maths can often be picked up as an AS in the 2nd year if OP decides to do Economics.At my college you are only allowed to do 3 AS generally unless you get an average of A grade and do 4 like me so 5 is obviously a lot of work when OP could focus on those 4 subjects.Further Maths isn't essential for Economics at LSE and if taken would mean you would have to take 4 A-Levels which is a lot of work load.Source:http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/undergrad..._BSc_Econ.aspx
    'Strongly preferred' is a polite way of saying they won't look at you unless you have further maths.
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    (Original post by Jooooshy)
    It's strongly preferred for a reason. I did the same amount of work as OP (5 AS, 4 A2 w/ M&FM) and here I am encouraging them to do the same. If OP can math then M&FM won't drag them down. I'm actually surprised that there are colleges that don't let their students begin with 4 AS levels.
    Further Maths can be a lot of work to get around the concepts especially in the harder applied modules but I didn't get any homework in it.There are 3 exams for each of Maths and Further Maths and a lot of past papers to do to make sure you have fully got the exam technique and are ready for any unusual questions.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Further Maths can be a lot of work to get around the concepts especially in the harder applied modules but I didn't get any homework in it.There are 3 exams for each of Maths and Further Maths and a lot of past papers to do to make sure you have fully got the exam technique and are ready for any unusual questions.
    You tell me like I haven't already done both..

    Some people need less practise for the 'unusual questions'.. C'est la vie.

    If OP is genuinely good at maths, then I wouldn't discourage them choosing FM. It would be a waste of potential, otherwise!
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    (Original post by Mia1001)
    So I've just done my GCSEs and I expect to get mainly As and A*s (as a guide, I got 7 A*s and 1 A in the mocks but I am doing 13 GCSEs for the real ones which is a lot harder). I have applied to Tiffin Girls' school in Greater London, and would take Maths, History, Economics and English Literature at AS. I have the option of taking Further Maths and have also applied for that. I'm just wondering if I should do it or stick to the regular 4 AS. I am expecting A* maths gcse and I regularly get about 98% in mock exams and also did FMSQ. I would like to apply to read law at Oxbridge so Further Maths isn't needed, but I also might consider Economics instead. Also, I think the exam would have the whole maths A level course taken in the first year and then further maths in the second year. Would it be too much unnecessary work? Thanks
    A fifth AS level wont make any difference on a UCAS application and doesnt directly link to law. Also AS is a lot of hard work, even harder if you have an extra one taking up free periods and study time, but if you want to do it just because you like maths or even if you just want to do it then go for it.


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    (Original post by Jooooshy)
    You tell me like I haven't already done both..

    Some people need less practise for the 'unusual questions'.. C'est la vie.

    If OP is genuinely good at maths, then I wouldn't discourage them choosing FM. It would be a waste of potential, otherwise!
    I had a good friend who got an A* in Maths and an A in Further Maths at GCSE and I couldn't get him to do any Maths at A-Level and at the time He was thinking of doing Law.Yes OP has strong mathematical ability as shown by the 98% but if they are not strongly thinking about a mathematically related career I wouldn't advise Further Maths and Law isn't really mathematically related and that means Maths and Further Maths are often counted as one subject making all that extra work worth nothing.
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    Well I'm just thinking that if I take further maths (which I will if my gcse results are good; I would think it would mean I could cope with a lot of work though I assume I will be wrong), it might be useful for economics degrees but if I decide to do law (I am about 80% sure) I might have to compromise my important English and history grades. And I would like to stress, I would not be able to drop further maths as the whole course would be taken in my second year and maths in the first year. And I just want to take economics as an intro for the first year.
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    I would say, if you enjoy maths, do it. If you dislike maths you won't get along with FP1 very well.
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    (Original post by Mia1001)
    Well I'm just thinking that if I take further maths (which I will if my gcse results are good; I would think it would mean I could cope with a lot of work though I assume I will be wrong), it might be useful for economics degrees but if I decide to do law (I am about 80% sure) I might have to compromise my important English and history grades. And I would like to stress, I would not be able to drop further maths as the whole course would be taken in my second year and maths in the first year. And I just want to take economics as an intro for the first year.
    IMO don't waste your time with subjects you're absolutely sure you're going to drop at A2. Instead focus on the other ones.
    f you get a good grade at AS not only you can apply to the very top Unis but also less frustration in A2.(and possibly no retakes )
    :cookie:
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    (Original post by Mia1001)
    So I've just done my GCSEs and I expect to get mainly As and A*s (as a guide, I got 7 A*s and 1 A in the mocks but I am doing 13 GCSEs for the real ones which is a lot harder). I have applied to Tiffin Girls' school in Greater London, and would take Maths, History, Economics and English Literature at AS. I have the option of taking Further Maths and have also applied for that. I'm just wondering if I should do it or stick to the regular 4 AS. I am expecting A* maths gcse and I regularly get about 98% in mock exams and also did FMSQ. I would like to apply to read law at Oxbridge so Further Maths isn't needed, but I also might consider Economics instead. Also, I think the exam would have the whole maths A level course taken in the first year and then further maths in the second year. Would it be too much unnecessary work? Thanks
    A lot of people here don't know what they're talking about.

    FM is NOT required for any economics course in the UK, but is preferable. IIRC 50% of offer holders for Cambridge economics don't have any form of FM (AS or A2). I am inclined to believe that LSE have a stronger preference for FM, given the extreme mathematical nature of their course. 5 AS is not too bad workload, especially if you're considering Oxbridge.

    My advice to you would be take 5 AS with the option to drop either FM or English for A2. If your school does A level maths in y12 then A level FM in y13 then you can opt to self-teach. I'd say that AS FM is incredibly easy, whilst A2 FM is where things get difficult but useful for an economics degree. And I wouldn't drop economics if I were you, seen as you seem to enjoy it. So even if it isnt required for an economics degree, you should pursue it for interest's sake.
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    (Original post by Mia1001)
    Well I'm just thinking that if I take further maths (which I will if my gcse results are good; I would think it would mean I could cope with a lot of work though I assume I will be wrong), it might be useful for economics degrees but if I decide to do law (I am about 80% sure) I might have to compromise my important English and history grades. And I would like to stress, I would not be able to drop further maths as the whole course would be taken in my second year and maths in the first year. And I just want to take economics as an intro for the first year.
    I do AS maths and further and want to study maths at Cambridge.

    If you're good at maths you hardly even class normal A-Level maths as a subject, as further maths just seems to make it look incredibly basic.

    For example, in my AS maths this year I am pretty positive I have 100% (ill let you know in 30 days if not) and the only revision I did was something like 6-8 papers leading up to the exam. Due to the ease of the papers, I could a 1:30 paper in 45 mins easily, so 6 hours revision to get 100% isn't much.

    So what I'm really trying to say is that: if you are good at maths, you will cope very well with maths and further maths, normal maths will be an absolute doddle.
 
 
 
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