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    I always wanted to do medicine but didn't pay any attention to my AS's and did bad so re-sat year 12, I plan on doing an economics degree as I found economics easy and it pays well too. Is there any chance of me doing graduate medicine?? Or even the 5 year course?? I know you need a degree with a medical background but is there a chance??


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    Anybody??? PLS


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    Yes you would be able to apply to graduate entry medicine programmes (those that dont look for science grads), provided you achieve a 2:1 or 1st in your economics degree. If you're just starting your degree i'd keep abreast of news concerning graduate programmes as it is likely there will be changes in the future
    Obviously you would also have to fulfil the work experience and aptitude testing requirements etc

    In terms of any of the 5 year courses I believe all ask for graduates w/o a science degree to fulfil the school leaver requirements so you would have to have Chemistry as an A level or whatever each individual school requires.

    You could also apply to one of the 6 year foundation courses, but there's no funding for those when youre a graduate.

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by Baronred)
    Yes you would be able to apply to graduate entry medicine programmes (those that dont look for science grads), provided you achieve a 2:1 or 1st in your economics degree. If you're just starting your degree i'd keep abreast of news concerning graduate programmes as it is likely there will be changes in the future
    Obviously you would also have to fulfil the work experience and aptitude testing requirements etc

    In terms of any of the 5 year courses I believe all ask for graduates w/o a science degree to fulfil the school leaver requirements so you would have to have Chemistry as an A level or whatever each individual school requires.

    You could also apply to one of the 6 year foundation courses, but there's no funding for those when youre a graduate.

    Hope that helps
    Southampton doesn't. I haven't heard of that before but perhaps that's just me.




    OP - Get a 2:1 or a first and a lot of medical schools would be happy to take you as long as you meet their A level/GCSE criteria. Chemistry is usually the main requirement for A levels but research each uni individually.
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    You don't necessarily need a degree with medical background, it would help but its not needed. Look into the medical schools and see what they accept.

    My friend in America got a degree in languages and is now going to start her first year in medical school.
    school.
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    (Original post by Stevelee)
    My friend in America got a degree in languages and is now going to start her first year in medical school.
    school.
    It's rather different in America though as your friend will still have done the necessary pre-med modules in her degree afaik.
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    Thanks guys! Makes me feel a lot better! Is it really hard to get a first at uni?? How would you compare it to a-levels? An A*??

    And I've looked at some of the unis and some are ok with me having any degree as long as I have a 2:1 or higher, do need work experience though and some say chemistry a-level I have an AS so I can continue that I guess when I finish my A2s


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    Keep in mind that the four year course probably wont exist by the time you get there.
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    Would I still be able to apply for the 5 year one?


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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    Would I still be able to apply for the 5 year one?


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    Yes. Again universities will have different requirements for graduates applying, and funding is pretty much non-existant for grad medics doing undergrad med. But yes, you could.
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    What about those 6-year Medicine courses with a foundation year for people with non-traditional subjects.

    http://www.mms.manchester.ac.uk/unde...ode=01430&pg=3

    Stuff like that. Or foundation years like the one at Bradford with an option of applying through UCAS or transferring to Leeds.
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    (Original post by Tabris)
    What about those 6-year Medicine courses with a foundation year for people with non-traditional subjects.

    http://www.mms.manchester.ac.uk/unde...ode=01430&pg=3

    Stuff like that. Or foundation years like the one at Bradford with an option of applying through UCAS or transferring to Leeds.
    Yeah but they usually have limits like family income and you coming from a not so good secondary school but I don't mind if I can get in, 6 years is long tho if I decide to do it after a degree. I might be able to apply with my current subjects and I have an AS in chemistry at E grade too but doubt that'll do much but thanks I'll look out for more


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    (Original post by Slim Shady 96)
    Yeah but they usually have limits like family income and you coming from a not so good secondary school but I don't mind if I can get in, 6 years is long tho if I decide to do it after a degree. I might be able to apply with my current subjects and I have an AS in chemistry at E grade too but doubt that'll do much but thanks I'll look out for more
    I'm talking about taking a year out after you finish your A-Levels (or doing a Foundation like the one at Bradford) and then moving straight on to medicine. If you actually want to do medicine, you should try for it through the most direct route because it will be cheaper and save you time.
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    (Original post by Tabris)
    I'm talking about taking a year out after you finish your A-Levels (or doing a Foundation like the one at Bradford) and then moving straight on to medicine. If you actually want to do medicine, you should try for it through the most direct route because it will be cheaper and save you time.
    I don't understand the Bradford thing I linked at the website and it's a 4 year course? Are you suggesting that I do the first year (foundation year) and then apply again?? Won't I have to finish the course??


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