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    I just read these articles below and they really touched me. I find it so weird that a place like this exists in the 21st century, to think that real people have to live their lives like this daily is just sickening.

    What makes it even sadder is the hopelessness of it all, there's nothing really anyone can do right now to stop it, I almost wish some CIA agent could go into North Korea and just shoot Kim Jung Un in the head (and everyone else tied to him) but that'd probably create more problems than it'd solve. Its also weird how Kim Jung Un was educated outside of North Korea yet still continues with such an oppressive regime. What are everyone else's thoughts on this?


    http://www.cracked.com/article_21373...rth-korea.html

    That article also links to another article which I also read which was even more horrifying http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/feb/01/northkorea
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    Its a terrible regime, worse still that for the US/China and South Korea it is actually easier to have it in place then to deal with the consequences of a collapse.
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    I find it both awful and yet poetically beautiful in a way. It's such an enigma as a nation and yet the regime is one of the most oppressive/brutal in place worldwide. I do agree with Aj above, the fallout if the regime were to collapse would be pretty damn immense, so the Far East would probably prefer it if the status quo (And thus, very little chance of actual trouble) was maintained.
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    I don't think impulsively destroying the North Korean establishment will be a good idea, since the people of North Korea pretty much see Kim Jong Un and his family as prophets.
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    I don't know if the people of north korea are brainwashed or anything but kim jung un is their god. You take him out and you've got WWIII

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    (Original post by QuantumSuicide)
    you've got WWIII
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    No you won't. How did you reach that conclusion?
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    No you won't. How did you reach that conclusion?
    I hear that North Koreans can come together to form a Megazord.
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    No you won't. How did you reach that conclusion?
    Ok, maybe not... I don't know much about north korea or its allies or anything, but if another nation were to kill him, then there will obviously we some sort of warfare. Like i said, he's their god. Surely north korea would do something.

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    (Original post by QuantumSuicide)
    Ok, maybe not... I don't know much about north korea or its allies or anything, but if another nation were to kill him, then there will obviously we some sort of warfare. Like i said, he's their god. Surely north korea would do something.

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    It is difficult to assess but what we can conclude is that the North Korean political apparatus weighs in heavily with its intelligence services. From what North Korean "survivors" have testified, all living communities are infiltrated by "informers" who report to the state to remove any threat of political dissent. Once more, freedom of "thought", information are so tightly regulated also that any contrary opinions to what the state produces are quickly dealt with -- with any form of individual political opposition (and their families) sent to labor camps.

    So, how much can you say that the North Korean population genuinely revere and perceive Kim Jong-Un as a God given that fear is the fabric that keeps that society together? Indeed, you can ask the contrary and ask how much popular support, if there is any, will remain when his omnipotence is challenged by an invading force? Any claims to divinity will likely fall on deaf-ears when the population see that their relative strength to the rest of the world is so little in comparison.
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    (Original post by Rlove95)
    I just read these articles below and they really touched me. I find it so weird that a place like this exists in the 21st century, to think that real people have to live their lives like this daily is just sickening.

    What makes it even sadder is the hopelessness of it all, there's nothing really anyone can do right now to stop it, I almost wish some CIA agent could go into North Korea and just shoot Kim Jung Un in the head (and everyone else tied to him) but that'd probably create more problems than it'd solve. Its also weird how Kim Jung Un was educated outside of North Korea yet still continues with such an oppressive regime. What are everyone else's thoughts on this?


    http://www.cracked.com/article_21373...rth-korea.html

    That article also links to another article which I also read which was even more horrifying http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/feb/01/northkorea
    Watch the VICE documentaries on it via YouTube. Some serious ****
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    (Original post by xmertic)
    Watch the VICE documentaries on it via YouTube. Some serious ****
    The VICE documentaries were really interesting. Surreal, but so damn interesting. Completely agree with you that OP (And anyone else for that matter) should check them out if they haven't.
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    (Original post by QuantumSuicide)
    I don't know if the people of north korea are brainwashed or anything but kim jung un is their god. You take him out and you've got WWIII

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    What be a proper boring World War.

    It would be, bap, bap, bap, bap from American Gunships and their Navy Would be sunk, quick establishment of a full-scale no-fly zone by NATO/USAF and then South Korea & Japan have the military power to win in a land war against them with or without NATO/US support.
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    (Original post by xmertic)
    Watch the VICE documentaries on it via YouTube. Some serious ****
    I'll definitely check them out, thanks.
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    The camps they have there are shocking. Some of them have "total control zones" where no one is ever released. There was one person (Shin Dong Hyuk) who managed to escape from one few years ago, and he is the only person known to have ever escaped from a total control zone. It was both interesting and sickening to read about it all and what he experienced.

    It's disgusting that such things are going on while the rest of the world looks the other way. But there's not an awful lot anyone can do at the moment without massive consequences for that region. Things will probably get better eventually, in the very long term.
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    (Original post by Rlove95)
    What are everyone else's thoughts on this?
    I think unfortunately that they need to come to the realisation that their regime is bad themselves. Any outside interference IMO would be a disastrous thing for all involved.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    The camps they have there are shocking. Some of them have "total control zones" where no one is ever released. There was one person (Shin Dong Hyuk) who managed to escape from one few years ago, and he is the only person known to have ever escaped from a total control zone. It was both interesting and sickening to read about it all and what he experienced.

    It's disgusting that such things are going on while the rest of the world looks the other way. But there's not an awful lot anyone can do at the moment without massive consequences for that region. Things will probably get better eventually, in the very long term.
    Yeah I've heard of his story. Its just sad that someone can be born into a concentration camp. He hadn't even committed any 'crimes' yet potentially had to live his whole life in this horrid place, I agree its so sickening yet intriguing. It does feel weird that no one is really prepared to do anything about it and everyone just looks the other way pretending nothing is going on. I think the world just doesn't really know how to deal with a place like that.
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    (Original post by leedswest)
    I think unfortunately that they need to come to the realisation that their regime is bad themselves. Any outside interference IMO would be a disastrous thing for all involved.
    Yeah, the problem is we can never really know how much they agree with the regime since everyone is too afraid to speak out against it (understandably), criticizing or questioning the regime not only leads to you being sent to a labor camp but to your whole family being sent away too. I don't think anyone would want to take that risk. No one is prepared to revolt so I doubt the regime will fall apart anytime soon but I agree, outside interference probably would be disastrous too.
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    It is difficult to assess but what we can conclude is that the North Korean political apparatus weighs in heavily with its intelligence services. From what North Korean "survivors" have testified, all living communities are infiltrated by "informers" who report to the state to remove any threat of political dissent. Once more, freedom of "thought", information are so tightly regulated also that any contrary opinions to what the state produces are quickly dealt with -- with any form of individual political opposition (and their families) sent to labor camps.

    So, how much can you say that the North Korean population genuinely revere and perceive Kim Jong-Un as a God given that fear is the fabric that keeps that society together? Indeed, you can ask the contrary and ask how much popular support, if there is any, will remain when his omnipotence is challenged by an invading force? Any claims to divinity will likely fall on deaf-ears when the population see that their relative strength to the rest of the world is so little in comparison.
    Completely agree with this. We can never really know what the North Korean population thinks of the population since defectors aren't really representative of the whole population and North Koreans inside the regime are far too afraid to speak out against it. For all we know, they could all hate it.
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    It is difficult to assess but what we can conclude is that the North Korean political apparatus weighs in heavily with its intelligence services. From what North Korean "survivors" have testified, all living communities are infiltrated by "informers" who report to the state to remove any threat of political dissent. Once more, freedom of "thought", information are so tightly regulated also that any contrary opinions to what the state produces are quickly dealt with -- with any form of individual political opposition (and their families) sent to labor camps.

    So, how much can you say that the North Korean population genuinely revere and perceive Kim Jong-Un as a God given that fear is the fabric that keeps that society together? Indeed, you can ask the contrary and ask how much popular support, if there is any, will remain when his omnipotence is challenged by an invading force? Any claims to divinity will likely fall on deaf-ears when the population see that their relative strength to the rest of the world is so little in comparison.
    Yeh, did you see how the north korean people reacted to the death of their previous leader? That was unbelievable. They must have been acting because their crying and behaviour was so unnatural. Perhaps the people hate their leaders over there but it's very difficult to say. :dontknow:

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    (Original post by QuantumSuicide)
    Yeh, did you see how the north korean people reacted to the death of their previous leader? That was unbelievable. They must have been acting because their crying and behaviour was so unnatural. Perhaps the people hate their leaders over there but it's very difficult to say. :dontknow:

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    Indeed, but how much would you say that was a representation of the entire population? Once more, the showing of that was directly handled by the North Korean Media and Communications officials, who, by all merits, have a mandate to ensure that the image both internally and externally show the leader in a divine light. I wasn't entirely convinced by the footage, personally. Synchronized tears with people formed in an orderly line being filmed by North Korean propaganda experts? Definitely take it with a pinch (or spoon) of salt.
 
 
 
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