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    Hey guys, I'm new here and just been going through all the results and I'm super scared! Some people have been dropping up to 10 marks!
    I'm going for medicine and I'm predicted 43 but I know it's so competitive. I don't know if it's worth applying to medicine like I'm not really that special..

    ANY ADVICE FOR YEAR 13 AND HOW TO DO WELL? (pleaseeeee)
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    Where are you applying and what subjects do you do?
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    (Original post by anniechan514)
    Where are you applying and what subjects do you do?

    I want to do medicine in the uk ( looking at oxford, leicester, sheffield and nottingham) and I do HL chem, bio, psy SL span, maths and performance

    but honestly people at our school have been dropping like 10 points in some cases.. someone predicted 44 got 35 adn got rejected from all her unis (for which she had conditionals for )
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    Well...in all honesty: someone being predicted a 44 and dropped to a 35 suggest 2 possible scenarios -
    1. Your school greatly overpredicts you or
    2. That person begged for his/her teacher to increase her predictions just to get an offer from the universities.

    Of course I am not saying that these 2 scenarios applies to you but being predicted a 44 then falling to a 35...that is a big difference. I can tell you that my school isn't experienced in IB (this is the 2nd year they're doing IB) and I got predicted a 44 and at the end I scored a 41. So I don't know whether your school is inexperienced or whatsoever. But schools tend to overpredict their students because they want their students to get the offer (of course I'm not saying overpredicting to the extent where they predict someone a 45 then end up scoring a 33 because that means that person will miss all their offers like the person you mentioned)

    But hey, don't be demoralized or afraid! Applying to universities (especially to UK universities) is all about the passion in the subject you're studying. You said you want to apply for medicine right? You already got a 43 which is good enough to apply to oxbridge and other colleges. Of course there are students out there who got predicted a 45 and you might be competing against them, but that is where the personal statement comes in. In my opinion (don't quote me on this), in the eyes of universities, students who score above 40+ will be considered the same, and that is where the personal statement and interview comes in to distinguish between people who got predicted scores well above 40.

    My advice for performing well in year 13? Well if you're only applying to UK universities there are 2 things you have to care about:
    1. Maintaining your performance and IB predicted grades
    2. UCAS and University applications
    You may be thinking that "Yeah these are only 2 things." Trust me it's a lot harder than what you may think.
    When you reach year 13, you still have a chance to 'boost' your predicted grades during the first term of school as predicted scores won't be submitted/finalized to universities until like october-november as December is when all the interview takes place. I believe high school term generally starts on September right? So yes you have a month or two to boost your predicted grades (not that I think you have to) but try and maintain a 43.

    Now during the first term back to school you will hear all those lectures about "applying to universities," "which universities are a good fit for you," "think about the subject/major you're applying for, etc." - listen to those, you may realize that medicine is definitely the right/not the right choice for you. (I didn't apply to any UK universities I only applied to the US but I went to the UK uni lectures anyways because I thought of applying to Cambridge for Economics).

    Then here comes the personal statement - and trust me this is extremely important. If you are competing against millions of candidates who are also applying for medicine, you want to write a personal statement that outcompetes everyone who is better than you. In this personal statement you have to show why you want to do medicine, what makes you special? why do you think the university wants you? (And by that I don't mean being egotistical) Your experiences with medicine, etc. During this stressful period you also have to do your EE, First drafts for IA's, etc. And this will be an extremely stressful period. And then after you submit everything by october-november (I believe for medicine you have to submit your application earlier) and you hear back from them and get an interview - place most of your time to prepare for your interview since you only get one shot and this is the time to impress them (do a lot of research, learn a lot of things OUTSIDE the IB syllabus). I believe for UK unis and for most interviews they are primarily subject-academic based (by that I mean they will be purely medical based if you are applying for medicine). Interviewers want to see how you think and it is ohkay to get some questions wrong. Never say "I don't know" for an answer, even if you don't know an answer, tell them the logic behind your answer - because I believe UK interviewers are interested in how a student thinks and they distinguish students based from that. Always seem interested in your subject, if you continue blabbering about your answer and your opinions - trust me interviewers would want to see that because they want a student who is 100% sure they want to study that subject.

    Ohkay you get the idea. Sorry if I'm diverting to another subject but yes the hard part about this stressful period is balancing between IB and Uni applications.

    I would say between the months of September-December: put more focus on Uni applications as you only get one shot in this and if you screw it up you won't get the offer. Then on January I believe you hear back from your uni applications and then start shifting your focus to IB and catch up with everything that you have missed.

    Of course I'm not saying you should ignore IB completely during September-December (you still have to maintain that grade and hand in your EE and stuff - you get those deadlines) but by focus I mean you should know how to balance off between IB and Uni applications.

    From personal experience, since I only applied to US universities, I had to additionally do SAT + SAT II and I have to tell you, focusing on IB, SAT + SAT II + writing all the different personal statements for different universities - it wasn't fun. I had to cut most of my social life off (not like completely cutting it off but cutting like 3/4 of it) and study my ass off. If you ask me the ratio of concentration I put into IB, SAT+SAT II and personal statements I would say it would be in a ratio of 1:2:2.

    But yes you get the idea: as IB people say - out of the 3 choices of sleeping, socializing and studying life, IB people can only choose 2. And I leaned towards sleeping and studying. Socializing is important definitely (you will realize how important it is when you work in the outside world), but definitely cut some of it if you need to focus on universities and studying (this is the first step towards a successful life - you can socialize ALL YOU WANT after uni applications + when you go to college but there are some people out there who can do all 3 -> they are insane).

    But yeah definitely pm me if you need anything or if you're worried about anything!

    And haha I did HL chem, maths and econ + SL italian ab., visual arts and English Lit A

    But anyways GOOD LUCK! (Y)
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    (Original post by anniechan514)
    Well...in all honesty: someone being predicted a 44 and dropped to a 35 suggest 2 possible scenarios -
    1. Your school greatly overpredicts you or
    2. That person begged for his/her teacher to increase her predictions just to get an offer from the universities.

    Of course I am not saying that these 2 scenarios applies to you but being predicted a 44 then falling to a 35...that is a big difference. I can tell you that my school isn't experienced in IB (this is the 2nd year they're doing IB) and I got predicted a 44 and at the end I scored a 41. So I don't know whether your school is inexperienced or whatsoever. But schools tend to overpredict their students because they want their students to get the offer (of course I'm not saying overpredicting to the extent where they predict someone a 45 then end up scoring a 33 because that means that person will miss all their offers like the person you mentioned)

    But hey, don't be demoralized or afraid! Applying to universities (especially to UK universities) is all about the passion in the subject you're studying. You said you want to apply for medicine right? You already got a 43 which is good enough to apply to oxbridge and other colleges. Of course there are students out there who got predicted a 45 and you might be competing against them, but that is where the personal statement comes in. In my opinion (don't quote me on this), in the eyes of universities, students who score above 40+ will be considered the same, and that is where the personal statement and interview comes in to distinguish between people who got predicted scores well above 40.

    My advice for performing well in year 13? Well if you're only applying to UK universities there are 2 things you have to care about:
    1. Maintaining your performance and IB predicted grades
    2. UCAS and University applications
    You may be thinking that "Yeah these are only 2 things." Trust me it's a lot harder than what you may think.
    When you reach year 13, you still have a chance to 'boost' your predicted grades during the first term of school as predicted scores won't be submitted/finalized to universities until like october-november as December is when all the interview takes place. I believe high school term generally starts on September right? So yes you have a month or two to boost your predicted grades (not that I think you have to) but try and maintain a 43.

    Now during the first term back to school you will hear all those lectures about "applying to universities," "which universities are a good fit for you," "think about the subject/major you're applying for, etc." - listen to those, you may realize that medicine is definitely the right/not the right choice for you. (I didn't apply to any UK universities I only applied to the US but I went to the UK uni lectures anyways because I thought of applying to Cambridge for Economics).

    Then here comes the personal statement - and trust me this is extremely important. If you are competing against millions of candidates who are also applying for medicine, you want to write a personal statement that outcompetes everyone who is better than you. In this personal statement you have to show why you want to do medicine, what makes you special? why do you think the university wants you? (And by that I don't mean being egotistical) Your experiences with medicine, etc. During this stressful period you also have to do your EE, First drafts for IA's, etc. And this will be an extremely stressful period. And then after you submit everything by october-november (I believe for medicine you have to submit your application earlier) and you hear back from them and get an interview - place most of your time to prepare for your interview since you only get one shot and this is the time to impress them (do a lot of research, learn a lot of things OUTSIDE the IB syllabus). I believe for UK unis and for most interviews they are primarily subject-academic based (by that I mean they will be purely medical based if you are applying for medicine). Interviewers want to see how you think and it is ohkay to get some questions wrong. Never say "I don't know" for an answer, even if you don't know an answer, tell them the logic behind your answer - because I believe UK interviewers are interested in how a student thinks and they distinguish students based from that. Always seem interested in your subject, if you continue blabbering about your answer and your opinions - trust me interviewers would want to see that because they want a student who is 100% sure they want to study that subject.

    Ohkay you get the idea. Sorry if I'm diverting to another subject but yes the hard part about this stressful period is balancing between IB and Uni applications.

    I would say between the months of September-December: put more focus on Uni applications as you only get one shot in this and if you screw it up you won't get the offer. Then on January I believe you hear back from your uni applications and then start shifting your focus to IB and catch up with everything that you have missed.

    Of course I'm not saying you should ignore IB completely during September-December (you still have to maintain that grade and hand in your EE and stuff - you get those deadlines) but by focus I mean you should know how to balance off between IB and Uni applications.

    From personal experience, since I only applied to US universities, I had to additionally do SAT + SAT II and I have to tell you, focusing on IB, SAT + SAT II + writing all the different personal statements for different universities - it wasn't fun. I had to cut most of my social life off (not like completely cutting it off but cutting like 3/4 of it) and study my ass off. If you ask me the ratio of concentration I put into IB, SAT+SAT II and personal statements I would say it would be in a ratio of 1:2:2.

    But yes you get the idea: as IB people say - out of the 3 choices of sleeping, socializing and studying life, IB people can only choose 2. And I leaned towards sleeping and studying. Socializing is important definitely (you will realize how important it is when you work in the outside world), but definitely cut some of it if you need to focus on universities and studying (this is the first step towards a successful life - you can socialize ALL YOU WANT after uni applications + when you go to college but there are some people out there who can do all 3 -> they are insane).

    But yeah definitely pm me if you need anything or if you're worried about anything!

    And haha I did HL chem, maths and econ + SL italian ab., visual arts and English Lit A

    But anyways GOOD LUCK! (Y)


    Omg, thank you, you angel!!
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    (Original post by NancyRoseC)
    Omg, thank you, you angel!!
    No worries If you need anything or reassurance, just pm me! Good luck with everything!
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    If it makes you feel better I was predicted 34 and did better than predicted so not everyone drops. This sounds really lame but use the motivation of proving people wrong. For example my bio teacher didn't believe in me fully and told me I would never get a 6. I used the motivation to prove him wrong and achieved a 6. So set yourself little motivations like this and work and study hard. but dont let horror IB stories bring you down, because I for example did much better than predicted
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    I was predicted 36, got 39 and in the end I was 8 raw marks away from getting 42 in 3 subjects. The difference between getting 45 and 39 could literally be 6 marks across all your subjects. You just need to find out what examiners look for when they award a 7 in an exam and nail that for your subjects
 
 
 
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