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    ?

    I know I should escape my comfort zone but come on don't we all need convenience at some point
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    Become less 'introverted' (you have misused introvert, introverts can be very social people, they just aren't energized by it).
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    option 1: librarian

    option 2: kill yourself
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    (Original post by KingStannis)
    option 1: librarian

    option 2: kill yourself
    I work at a library, its not overly introvert friendly.
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    Work in a morgue. The dead don't talk back
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    I'm an introvert and I've done sales and customer service and loved both, but wasn't too keen on some of the teams I worked with.
    The pressure and targets were fine, talking to customers was fine because I focussed on professionalism not my personality! But sometimes the internal competition wasn't good because other people took my introversion to mean that I'm stuck-up and if I congratulated them on sales, they took offence, if I didn't loudly celebrate my own sales, they took offence etc.
    It's definitely not for everyone, but I can honestly say being an introver may well make you pretty good at it, if you can find the right sort of environment to do it in!
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    (Original post by easyastau)
    I work at a library, its not overly introvert friendly.
    Okay then.




    Option 1: kill yourself
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    Maybe an extra in primary school Christmas productions

    Spoiler:
    Show
    as a snowflake

    :teehee:
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    Become an academic. Carrying out self-directed and solitary (if you so wish) research would be perfect. That's what I'm aiming for.

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    Mathematician, engineer, lab technician, software developer, etc.
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    I am fully aware of what an introvert is and I have attempted to escape my introversion, by working as a marketing associate in an office, left because it was to robotic and mundane, and now working as a hotel receptionist, which is far to extroverted for me, I have to greet people with a 'bubbly' attitude face to face. Thats why I'm trying to reevaluate what kind of jobs I can get.

    Also I'm in my final year of university and I know I will have this exact problem when I graduate.
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    (Original post by Katie_p)
    I'm an introvert and I've done sales and customer service and loved both, but wasn't too keen on some of the teams I worked with.
    The pressure and targets were fine, talking to customers was fine because I focussed on professionalism not my personality! But sometimes the internal competition wasn't good because other people took my introversion to mean that I'm stuck-up and if I congratulated them on sales, they took offence, if I didn't loudly celebrate my own sales, they took offence etc.
    It's definitely not for everyone, but I can honestly say being an introver may well make you pretty good at it, if you can find the right sort of environment to do it in!
    I have tried to go down this path as it is very easy to get into, but I found out I'm not a persuasive person so I'm just not good at sales.
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    (Original post by daydreamer93)
    I am fully aware of what an introvert is and I have attempted to escape my introversion, by working as a marketing associate in an office, left because it was to robotic and mundane, and now working as a hotel receptionist, which is far to extroverted for me, I have to greet people with a 'bubbly' attitude face to face. Thats why I'm trying to reevaluate what kind of jobs I can get.
    Would you like me to teach you the difference between 'to' & 'too'?
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    (Original post by daydreamer93)
    I have tried to go down this path as it is very easy to get into, but I found out I'm not a persuasive person so I'm just not good at sales.
    It would still be worth looking at customer service if you are struggling for other ideas - it's much more about patience and just sitting there taking what the customer wants to say than persuading them of anything. I thought I wasn't persuasive at all, but I bother to learn the facts of the product I'm selling (not saying you don't, just most people I worked with didn't, and relied on "personality") which meant I did as well as anyone else, if not better on occassion.
    Otherwise there are plenty of admin roles in offices that require minimum involvement with the public, athough admittedly they're more restricted even than customer service in terms of progression. Or even secretarial stuff - you'd need to be able to talk to your boss, but I'd imagine if you found a secretarial/PA role rather than a receptionist one, you'd not have much interaction with other people.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    Would you like me to teach you the difference between 'to' & 'too'?
    haha I always laugh at people when they correct my typos, seriously dude, do something more constructive. And its always ironic, because I'm at imperial college so I doubt you're at some place better.:cool:


    (Original post by Katie_p)
    It would still be worth looking at customer service if you are struggling for other ideas - it's much more about patience and just sitting there taking what the customer wants to say than persuading them of anything. I thought I wasn't persuasive at all, but I bother to learn the facts of the product I'm selling (not saying you don't, just most people I worked with didn't, and relied on "personality") which meant I did as well as anyone else, if not better on occassion.
    Otherwise there are plenty of admin roles in offices that require minimum involvement with the public, athough admittedly they're more restricted even than customer service in terms of progression. Or even secretarial stuff - you'd need to be able to talk to your boss, but I'd imagine if you found a secretarial/PA role rather than a receptionist one, you'd not have much interaction with other people.
    Yeah, of course I look for the office jobs when applying but its not easy getting a job and almost every time I get a job its some extroverted bull****. I've tried freelance work in the past, but can never fully focus on it. Also getting jobs in retail is almost impossible with a thousand other students applying also.
    What I would like is some warehousing job, but these seem really hard to get, from my experience of applying.
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    (Original post by daydreamer93)
    I am fully aware of what an introvert is and I have attempted to escape my introversion, by working as a marketing associate in an office, left because it was to robotic and mundane, and now working as a hotel receptionist, which is far to extroverted for me, I have to greet people with a 'bubbly' attitude face to face. Thats why I'm trying to reevaluate what kind of jobs I can get.

    Also I'm in my final year of university and I know I will have this exact problem when I graduate.
    I don't think you can just 'escape' your introversion, but at the same time, burying yourself in it doesn't seem like a great idea either. Although I agree that where you have to be 'on' and 'bubbly' all the time probably wouldn't be quite right (it's a good way to burn out as an introvert-after all it's exhausting doing all that people-ing), there's no reason either to go to the other extreme and go for a job you can hide away in.

    For one thing, in terms of careers you won't progress far if you just hide away in your solitary job. Soft skills like dealing with people are really important in any work place in this day and age. In my opinion, the best thing is to look for jobs where you can have a good balance-i.e. sometimes you will be required to work with people and sometimes you will have to go and work alone on your own. I find that works for me in my part time job; when I'm serving customers it's often not for long periods so I've been able to build on putting on a 'bubbly' front to the point where I'm comfortable with it without feeling exhausted by it being constant. I deal with people for a bit and then often I get to go off and recharge by doing some stuff on my own for a bit.

    I highly recommend reading 'Quiet, the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking' to get some sense of using your introversion to your advantage and working around the parts that clash with the somewhat extroversion focused society we happen to live in.
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    (Original post by daydreamer93)
    haha I always laugh at people when they correct my typos, seriously dude, do something more constructive. And its always ironic, because I'm at imperial college so I doubt you're at some place better.:cool:
    Arrogant people like you give us a bad name, just stop.
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    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    Arrogant people like you give us a bad name, just stop.
    I'm not normally arrogant, and since this is only just a forum concealing my identity, I thought why not be a douche for once, to put that tool in his place. But I know it's still not an excuse.

    (Original post by heidigirl)
    I don't think you can just 'escape' your introversion, but at the same time, burying yourself in it doesn't seem like a great idea either. Although I agree that where you have to be 'on' and 'bubbly' all the time probably wouldn't be quite right (it's a good way to burn out as an introvert-after all it's exhausting doing all that people-ing), there's no reason either to go to the other extreme and go for a job you can hide away in.

    For one thing, in terms of careers you won't progress far if you just hide away in your solitary job. Soft skills like dealing with people are really important in any work place in this day and age. In my opinion, the best thing is to look for jobs where you can have a good balance-i.e. sometimes you will be required to work with people and sometimes you will have to go and work alone on your own. I find that works for me in my part time job; when I'm serving customers it's often not for long periods so I've been able to build on putting on a 'bubbly' front to the point where I'm comfortable with it without feeling exhausted by it being constant. I deal with people for a bit and then often I get to go off and recharge by doing some stuff on my own for a bit.

    I highly recommend reading 'Quiet, the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking' to get some sense of using your introversion to your advantage and working around the parts that clash with the somewhat extroversion focused society we happen to live in.
    Yeah but I'm at a point where I don't really need that 'dream' job, just a job to help with car insurance, and pay rent. The job you described seems to be a job I'll find from just experiencing jobs, which I've tried to do, I've tried to escape my introversion but that just ends up me hating life even more, and I have never really had a job thats aided my introversion. And I don't think its bad thing in getting a solitary job, because after all whats life if we can't be comfortable and enjoy what we do, the extra money is not worth that extroverted effort.
 
 
 
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