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    I've recently started a new job with the contract lasting 1 year. I am entitled to 25 days holiday per calendar year excluding bank holidays. Would I get 25 days for the remainder of the year and then an additional 25 days next year until I finish in July or is it split into 12/13 days per half year. How would it work in this situation?

    It is my first job so I'm not sure how it works.
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    (Original post by UWS)
    I've recently started a new job with the contract lasting 1 year. I am entitled to 25 days holiday per calendar year excluding bank holidays. Would I get 25 days for the remainder of the year and then an additional 25 days next year until I finish in July or is it split into 12/13 days per half year. How would it work in this situation?

    It is my first job so I'm not sure how it works.
    You need to find out your firms year end. It may not necessarily be December.

    Once the firm starts its new financial year you will get your full 25 days from that date.

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    (Original post by UWS)
    I've recently started a new job with the contract lasting 1 year. I am entitled to 25 days holiday per calendar year excluding bank holidays. Would I get 25 days for the remainder of the year and then an additional 25 days next year until I finish in July or is it split into 12/13 days per half year. How would it work in this situation?

    It is my first job so I'm not sure how it works.
    You will get the pro rata number of days. So depending on whether your firm has a fixed year, or you have a personal year (probably the former) it works like this - say the calendar year is 1 Jan - 31 Dec and you start work on 1 July, you will get exactly half the full year of leave eg 12.5 days, plus Bank Holidays. Deep in the companies HR rules will be the equation and rounding rules they use for people who start on random days.

    Companies have different rules on leave remaining at the end of the year. So say you get to December and still have 8 days to take, some firms you just lose it, some let you carry it all over, some let you carry a fixed number of days over, eg 3 days and you lose 5.

    If you leave a company with leave remaining, some will pay you for it, ie HR will calculate a rate for a day, based on your salary and give you that rate for each day of leave you have remaining in your final salary. However, remember that if you leave part way through a year, you will only be entitled to that part of a year of leave.

    It sounds from your description that if you start work on say 1 August you will have 8/12 x 25 days of leave to take before 31 Dec and then 7/12 x 25 days to take from Jan to Jul next year.
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    (Original post by 2710)
    You need to find out your firms year end. It may not necessarily be December.

    Once the firm starts its new financial year you will get your full 25 days from that date.

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    This isn't true, his 25 days will be pro-rata from the date he joins, likely split at the point of their new financial year. However it certainly won't be 0 days up until financial year and then 25 after it - following that approach would result in lost holidays!

    Threeport has pretty much smashed the answer above, read that OP
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)

    ....
    It sounds from your description that if you start work on say 1 August you will have 8/12 x 25 days of leave to take before 31 Dec and then...
    Do you mean 5/12 x 25 days?


    (Original post by M1011)
    This isn't true, his 25 days will be pro-rata from the date he joins, likely split at the point of their new financial year. However it certainly won't be 0 days up until financial year and then 25 after it - following that approach would result in lost holidays!

    Threeport has pretty much smashed the answer above, read that OP
    Oh right my bad lol
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    (Original post by 2710)
    Do you mean 5/12 x 25 days?




    Oh right my bad lol
    Yes, he means 5/12.
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    Pro rata.
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    (Original post by TheCareersGuy)
    Pro rata.
    Thank goodness the careers guy was here to save the day
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    Alternatively you might just have to take the 25 days at some point within your year-long contract. I'm on a year-long contract and joined at a random time and that's the case for me - my holiday entitlement is independent of the standard holiday year for permanent staff. I could take all 25 days right now if I wanted. Or I could take them next January. Up to me (obviously most managers prefer you to spread them out a bit though!)
 
 
 
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