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    Pretty self-explanatory. Specifically, things such as programming languages, will I need to have any sort of knowledge about them or will they be taught in the course?
    Would it put me at a disadvantage if I didn't know them?

    For some background, I'm going to do Maths, Economics, Biology and Chemistry at A-Level. Are these good courses for CompSci?

    Is there any other things I should have decent knowledge about before I do CompSci apart from programming languages.

    Is there any other things I need to know about the course before I decide I want to do it? I know it's a while yet but it's good to be prepared.

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    It would be good to know about it before the course starts, obviously. I started programming as soon as I knew I was doing computer science with my maths degree, and it's not actually that hard.
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    It would be good to know about it before the course starts, obviously. I started programming as soon as I knew I was doing computer science with my maths degree, and it's not actually that hard.
    I'm stuck between doing an information technology degree or a computer science one. I think the programming might be a bit much for me.

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    Which language do you expect to program in? If it's any of the C-based languages, don't worry because there are loads of tutorials you can go through online
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    About programming, this is like an aspiring chef looking at an oven and saying well you look difficult to operate so i won't go into cooking. There is more to comp sci. then programming, from artificial intelligence to crypto systems, programming is a small part of it.

    Your a-levels are good for cs especially if Maths is pure maths. Knowing statistics, probability theory, topology will be very helpful during your studies, and yes having some prior programming knowledge is helpful for first year but not a must. Look at some specific computer science books to have a feel as to what the course is about. You go to university to learn, no point in learning all the things you will be taught as preparation. have a decent maths background. Learn how to handle huge , huge amounts of caffeine :P
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    (Original post by dkdeath)
    About programming, this is like an aspiring chef looking at an oven and saying well you look difficult to operate so i won't go into cooking. There is more to comp sci. then programming, from artificial intelligence to crypto systems, programming is a small part of it.

    Your a-levels are good for cs especially if Maths is pure maths. Knowing statistics, probability theory, topology will be very helpful during your studies, and yes having some prior programming knowledge is helpful for first year but not a must. Look at some specific computer science books to have a feel as to what the course is about. You go to university to learn, no point in learning all the things you will be taught as preparation. have a decent maths background. Learn how to handle huge , huge amounts of caffeine :P
    Ah I'll need to have a good look and long think about what I want to do, it's either this or IT management, I'll need to do some more research.

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    Yea, you should learn a little and try and actually DO something with it. Listing languages that you've tinkered about with isn't impressive. Doing stuff with your skills is. Also, your A Levels are fine...maybe swap bio for physics/further maths?
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    (Original post by Frank the Tankk)
    Yea, you should learn a little and try and actually DO something with it. Listing languages that you've tinkered about with isn't impressive. Doing stuff with your skills is. Also, your A Levels are fine...maybe swap bio for physics/further maths?
    I would have done physics but I thought if I change my mind about what I want to do, I'll have more options open with the combination of biology and chemistry rather than just one or the other.

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    No. I just graduated with a 2:1 in computer science and had no prior knowledge. As long as you put in the effort during university you'll be fine.

    To be honest the programming is the easy part of computer science depending on what modules you take.
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    (Original post by ZSHNZ)
    I would have done physics but I thought if I change my mind about what I want to do, I'll have more options open with the combination of biology and chemistry rather than just one or the other.

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    Suppose...as long as you have maths, you're fine...and chemistry is often one of the "preferred subjects".
    For a beginner language, I'd recommend Python...it's the first I tried and it's not got as steep a learning curve as the C languages. It's also a kind of in-demand language atm.
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    Yes, those are good A-levels.

    CS degrees routinely teach programming from scratch. But, to give you something to write about on your personal statement, go on codecademy.com, learn some Python, and mention you've done this.
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    I would swap bio or econ for further maths/physics/computing.

    As others have mentioned, Codecademy is a good start.
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    Yeah codeacademy is a good place to start I'm in Y11 and I would like to go into programming and this helps to teach you how to use code and it builds up from a simple base to eventually making your own projects which is useful for applying your coding knowledge.
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    (Original post by ZSHNZ)
    Pretty self-explanatory. Specifically, things such as programming languages, will I need to have any sort of knowledge about them or will they be taught in the course?
    Would it put me at a disadvantage if I didn't know them?

    For some background, I'm going to do Maths, Economics, Biology and Chemistry at A-Level. Are these good courses for CompSci?

    Is there any other things I should have decent knowledge about before I do CompSci apart from programming languages.

    Is there any other things I need to know about the course before I decide I want to do it? I know it's a while yet but it's good to be prepared.

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    Most universities teach assuming you have no knowledge; in fact, when you apply to some they explicitly say not to try to teach yourself before the course starts so you don't learn bad practises. You'll find a mix of students on the course, you'll get expert programmers and people with no experience at all, but as long as you have the interest enough to keep studying then you will be fine.




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