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    Heyheyhey,

    Just wanna ask you guys a questions. How hard is a level english literature? Planned on studying history, psychology, sociology and spanish due to my a level option blocks not allowing me to do rs yet have been told doing a level eng lit would be a lot better than psychology to get me into the top unis.

    One did enjoy it more than eng lang at GCSE level and am wondering if the rumour that eng lit is the hardest a level is true, and whether if i put a lot of effort into it i can achieve a high grade.
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    There's no way English Lit is the hardest A level. Plain as.

    At the end of the day no one can tell you if it's hard or not objectively because everyone is going to have a different experience, e.g. different circumstances, different examination boards, etc. If you're generally good at English, want to put the work in and enjoy it, it won't be as hard for you as someone who hates it but just wants to do it to get a good round of qualifications.

    English is far better than Psychology as far as most unis are concerned but it always depends on your course.

    In my personal experience, English Lit is very easy. I never had to revise very hard (it's an odd subject to revise for anyway, you sort of have to listen and learn the first time around because otherwise you're gonna have a tough time of learning the text and the interpretations yourself. It's not like a factual subject like the sciences), always got As in mocks and essays. Compared to English at uni, A level is a walk in the park. But that's because I love English and put the time in and am (blowing my own trumpet here) pretty good at it. So take from that what you will! But I always recommend English A level :-) it's interesting and worthwhile.
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    English literature at A-Level isn't hard if you know how to back up your points with evidence, consider wider reading and have good writing skills.

    Without the qualities and skills needed in literature, you may find the course difficult. Especially, if you don't expand on your analysis and you waffle a lot in sentences.


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    I think with English Literature the exams are known for being quite hard and the marking is very subjective. However, if you enjoy reading and if you are passionate about literature, that should not be something that puts you off. I personally found it really interesting to study a variety of plays, poems and novels in the first year, and now I've started the A2 course it's also really exciting.

    Different people will say different things for what they think the hardest A-Level is, but it ultimately depends on what subject they're studying. Some people have said to me before that English Literature is "probably really easy." It's clear that they haven't studied it because it's not easy - I think mastering the essay technique takes time and it's not a subject where you can simply learn notes from a textbook.

    So I think it'd be a great subject to take as long as you like books. I know people that took literature and didn't like reading, so they hated the course and found it tedious, but if you're interested, your passion will definitely come through in your work and you'll have a great time studying the texts.

    (Also, Spanish is a great choice! If you have any questions related to that I'd also be happy to help out!)
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    (Original post by adskay)
    Heyheyhey,

    Just wanna ask you guys a questions. How hard is a level english literature? Planned on studying history, psychology, sociology and spanish due to my a level option blocks not allowing me to do rs yet have been told doing a level eng lit would be a lot better than psychology to get me into the top unis.

    One did enjoy it more than eng lang at GCSE level and am wondering if the rumour that eng lit is the hardest a level is true, and whether if i put a lot of effort into it i can achieve a high grade.
    Its not the hardest A Level, not even close. It's just a test of memory to see if you can remember everything your teachers told you and write it down in an open book coursework. You can work hard if you like but as long as you know the basics you can easily make your way through the exams with minimal revision as theyre open book too. The only downside is that it's incredibly boring and a lot of your class will either drop it straight away or start skipping the lesson

    Edit: Also, employers are looking for qualifications in Psychology for our generation, and is just as impressive as Eng Lit for UCAS. At the end of the day, unless the course specifies that it prefers you do certain a levels, then it wont matter which 4 you pick.

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    I completely agree with 'Dougieowner'. I've just taken my English A2 exam, and I wouldn't say it was easy or hard, because the marking is always so subjective. I've always known that I'm pretty good at English Lit, but I can never know for sure how an essay/exam has gone until I get the mark back. (I ended up getting a high A at AS level last year, but was very shocked to find that out - two of my friends got Bs, and they've always been top of the class students).
    All it comes down to is whether you are prepared to put a lot of effort into it - of course, if you know the texts well and can write a good essay on poetry, then you are bound to get a decent grade. If you have a naturally 'flowy' essay style (which you probably do as you're keen on history and sociology), then you should have no trouble!
    Finally, psychology is definitely not a well-regarded A level subject by unis (generally). English literature is one of the fundamental subjects; English, Maths, Science. An A in English Lit will definitely be more impressive than an A in psychology. Plus, even if you wanted to do something like psychology/sociology at uni you wouldn't even need to have studied those A levels, as not all schools offer them. My school doesn't offer either!
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    (Original post by kate113855)
    There's no way English Lit is the hardest A level. Plain as.

    At the end of the day no one can tell you if it's hard or not objectively because everyone is going to have a different experience, e.g. different circumstances, different examination boards, etc. If you're generally good at English, want to put the work in and enjoy it, it won't be as hard for you as someone who hates it but just wants to do it to get a good round of qualifications.

    English is far better than Psychology as far as most unis are concerned but it always depends on your course.

    In my personal experience, English Lit is very easy. I never had to revise very hard (it's an odd subject to revise for anyway, you sort of have to listen and learn the first time around because otherwise you're gonna have a tough time of learning the text and the interpretations yourself. It's not like a factual subject like the sciences), always got As in mocks and essays. Compared to English at uni, A level is a walk in the park. But that's because I love English and put the time in and am (blowing my own trumpet here) pretty good at it. So take from that what you will! But I always recommend English A level :-) it's interesting and worthwhile.
    Sorry I have a quick question. By no means am I trying to demean you. A lot of people say am instead of I'm, is this the correct use? Also, within this sentence is my grammar and punctuation correct? - Lastly, do you know any good websites to help me improve me English grammar and punctuation?
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    (Original post by All-rounder)
    Its not the hardest A Level, not even close. It's just a test of memory to see if you can remember everything your teachers told you and write it down in an open book coursework. You can work hard if you like but as long as you know the basics you can easily make your way through the exams with minimal revision as theyre open book too. The only downside is that it's incredibly boring and a lot of your class will either drop it straight away or start skipping the lesson

    Edit: Also, employers are looking for qualifications in Psychology for our generation, and is just as impressive as Eng Lit for UCAS. At the end of the day, unless the course specifies that it prefers you do certain a levels, then it wont matter which 4 you pick.

    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    You have absolutely no idea what you're talking about. English Literature is one of the most respected A-levels there is, and one of the oldest. It is not a 'memory test' at all, as the set-texts change every few years, the questions (especially section B, where free reign is pretty much given) are always different and can't be anticipated, etc. Just 'knowing the basics' will fail you and you will not get through the subject by skipping classes. The coursework requires deep understanding, and some exam boards make you research political theory and apply it to literature, with university-style research and referencing needed. AS exams are open-book, but A2 exams are closed-book. Edexcel and WJEC enforce an unseen section where students go in not knowing what one of the texts they have to write about is at all; they are given a poem or extract in the exam they have never seen before and have to write an essay about it. Open-book exams generally give no advantage anyway, as it is better to just learn the quotes off by heart you want to use, instead of frantically looking through the book in the exam to find them, wasting a lot of time.

    Employers are not looking for qualifications in psychology at all; where did you get this from? There are too many psychology graduates to meet the demand for jobs. It is incredibly hard to become a clinical psychologist with only a few openings for the thousands of psychology graduates each year, who will need a master's degree as well as their first degree. Psychology (although a 'decent' subject) is not as impressive as English Literature for UCAS applications; again where did you get this from? It is not a 'facilitating subject', as stated here: http://www.russellgroup.org/InformedChoices-latest.pdf

    'Subjects that can be viewed as facilitating subjects are:

    Mathematics and Further Mathematics
    English Literature
    Physics
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Geography
    History
    Languages (Classical and Modern)'

    -----------------

    Psychology is in the B list for Cambridge University, whereas English Literature is in the A list: https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604

    The 4 A-levels you pick really do matter; you can't just skate by, choosing the wrong subjects when so many other people will have chosen the right ones.
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    Since history is a humanities subject units don't really care as long as you don't do too many 'soft' subjects, and only psychology would be considered one of those, so you should be fine either way.


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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    You have absolutely no idea what you're talking about. English Literature is one of the most respected A-levels there is, and one of the oldest. It is not a 'memory test' at all, as the set-texts change every few years, the questions (especially section B, where free reign is pretty much given) are always different and can't be anticipated, etc. Just 'knowing the basics' will fail you and you will not get through the subject by skipping classes. The coursework requires deep understanding, and some exam boards make you research political theory and apply it to literature, with university-style research and referencing needed. AS exams are open-book, but A2 exams are closed-book. Edexcel and WJEC enforce an unseen section where students go in not knowing what one of the texts they have to write about is at all; they are given a poem or extract in the exam they have never seen before and have to write an essay about it. Open-book exams generally give no advantage anyway, as it is better to just learn the quotes off by heart you want to use, instead of frantically looking through the book in the exam to find them, wasting a lot of time.

    Employers are not looking for qualifications in psychology at all; where did you get this from? There are too many psychology graduates to meet the demand for jobs. It is incredibly hard to become a clinical psychologist with only a few openings for the thousands of psychology graduates each year, who will need a master's degree as well as their first degree. Psychology (although a 'decent' subject) is not as impressive as English Literature for UCAS applications; again where did you get this from? It is not a 'facilitating subject', as stated here: http://www.russellgroup.org/InformedChoices-latest.pdf

    'Subjects that can be viewed as facilitating subjects are:

    Mathematics and Further Mathematics
    English Literature
    Physics
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Geography
    History
    Languages (Classical and Modern)'

    -----------------

    Psychology is in the B list for Cambridge University, whereas English Literature is in the A list: https://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604

    The 4 A-levels you pick really do matter; you can't just skate by, choosing the wrong subjects when so many other people will have chosen the right ones.
    I've taken it as one of my A-Levels. For the coursework, all that was necessary was rewording the lecturers notes and without any revision or hard work at all I still got an A in my coursework.
    Whilst the chosen texts change every few years, you're only doing the AS year for 1 year, you dont need to know many different kinds so that makes no difference.
    The fact that section B is free reign shows that even a great amount of revision wont prepare you, it's better to go in knowing the basics rather than stressing over having to know every little unimportant thing.
    Did you sit the AS paper this year if you do the subject? I cant remember which specific exam it is, but one of the highest mark questions was asking about the significance of the opening statements. You don't have to be a genius to find that in the book without searching franticly.

    I'll retract my statement about psychology as it was secondhand information and was clearly flawed as there are many graduates. Although, it was not aimed as University level, just A-Level. Employers like that people have a background in studying it, no matter how minor, whether its just GCSE or A Level, it doesnt just have to be Uni level.
    Whilst Psychology may be in the B list for Cambridge University, that's Cambridge, a bit too ambitious for most.

    English Literature is the only A Level I regret taking, because I genuinely feel as though I've come out of it learning nothing, even though I got an A in my coursework and A*'s for practice essays. The writing skills they taught us were appauling and didnt expand much as progression from GCSE level, thankfully I was able to fix it because I also took History.
    For many courses in Uni, you can choose any subjects and still get a placement as long as the grades are good. Law for example, doesnt require any qualification in law prior to Uni level, and from my research there's only 1 or 2 respectable Universities that require either a certain level AS grade as well as your 3 A2 grades or an Essay based subject at A2.
    The fact that I've done this in my English course is proof that you can skate by and still get good grades. I'm not saying you can do the bare minimum, im saying that you just need basics and any intelligent person can make it work from there. I chose subjects much more wisely than others may have because I didnt look for what uni's supposedly find as a preference, which change every so often btw, and instead went for subjects that I enjoy and am already good at. You could have the perfect dream team of a combination of AS and A2 subjects but it still comes down to Grades and Interviews to decide if you'll get a placement in the course you want at the Uni you want.


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    (Original post by All-rounder)
    I've taken it as one of my A-Levels. For the coursework, all that was necessary was rewording the lecturers notes and without any revision or hard work at all I still got an A in my coursework.
    Whilst the chosen texts change every few years, you're only doing the AS year for 1 year, you dont need to know many different kinds so that makes no difference.
    The fact that section B is free reign shows that even a great amount of revision wont prepare you, it's better to go in knowing the basics rather than stressing over having to know every little unimportant thing.
    Did you sit the AS paper this year if you do the subject? I cant remember which specific exam it is, but one of the highest mark questions was asking about the significance of the opening statements. You don't have to be a genius to find that in the book without searching franticly.

    I'll retract my statement about psychology as it was secondhand information and was clearly flawed as there are many graduates. Although, it was not aimed as University level, just A-Level. Employers like that people have a background in studying it, no matter how minor, whether its just GCSE or A Level, it doesnt just have to be Uni level.
    Whilst Psychology may be in the B list for Cambridge University, that's Cambridge, a bit too ambitious for most.

    English Literature is the only A Level I regret taking, because I genuinely feel as though I've come out of it learning nothing, even though I got an A in my coursework and A*'s for practice essays. The writing skills they taught us were appauling and didnt expand much as progression from GCSE level, thankfully I was able to fix it because I also took History.
    For many courses in Uni, you can choose any subjects and still get a placement as long as the grades are good. Law for example, doesnt require any qualification in law prior to Uni level, and from my research there's only 1 or 2 respectable Universities that require either a certain level AS grade as well as your 3 A2 grades or an Essay based subject at A2.
    The fact that I've done this in my English course is proof that you can skate by and still get good grades. I'm not saying you can do the bare minimum, im saying that you just need basics and any intelligent person can make it work from there. I chose subjects much more wisely than others may have because I didnt look for what uni's supposedly find as a preference, which change every so often btw, and instead went for subjects that I enjoy and am already good at. You could have the perfect dream team of a combination of AS and A2 subjects but it still comes down to Grades and Interviews to decide if you'll get a placement in the course you want at the Uni you want.


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    Yeah, they can't have been great teachers if they haven't corrected you on the spelling of the word appalling by now! Haha, but no seriously English Lit is not a really easy subject... Despite my high grade at AS last year, I found the in-depth study of the books hard work and it is a subject that requires interest and perseverance.
    Psychology and sociology are both considered 'soft'. Not at university, but definitely at A level. There are no two ways about it; a core subject such as English lit is always going to look better than a 'new' subject like psychology or sociology. Plus, some unis actually dislike students studying A level psychology/sociology/law etc., because often what they teach at A level is incorrect or simplified, so when they get to degree level they have to be retaught.
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    (Original post by Troytheboy)
    Sorry I have a quick question. By no means am I trying to demean you. A lot of people say am instead of I'm, is this the correct use? Also, within this sentence is my grammar and punctuation correct? - Lastly, do you know any good websites to help me improve me English grammar and punctuation?
    In my experience the only people who say am instead of I'm have a strong Liverpool accent haha. It's not correct. I said " I love English and put the time in and am (blowing my own trumpet here)"

    If you get rid of the "English and put the time in and" bit it's correct. It's just using the I from before. It's difficult to explain over the internet. Even so, there's no need to use correct grammar on the internet. In the real world of work and education it matters, but I'm pretty sure everyone knows what you mean on here.
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    (Original post by libertinegirl96)
    Yeah, they can't have been great teachers if they haven't corrected you on the spelling of the word appalling by now! Haha, but no seriously English Lit is not a really easy subject... Despite my high grade at AS last year, I found the in-depth study of the books hard work and it is a subject that requires interest and perseverance.
    Psychology and sociology are both considered 'soft'. Not at university, but definitely at A level. There are no two ways about it; a core subject such as English lit is always going to look better than a 'new' subject like psychology or sociology. Plus, some unis actually dislike students studying A level psychology/sociology/law etc., because often what they teach at A level is incorrect or simplified, so when they get to degree level they have to be retaught.
    My apologies, I typed appalling on my iPod which is far too old to work correctly on. Normally my grammar is fine, however I have to make exceptions when using the mobile version
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    (Original post by kate113855)
    In my experience the only people who say am instead of I'm have a strong Liverpool accent haha. It's not correct. I said " I love English and put the time in and am (blowing my own trumpet here)"

    If you get rid of the "English and put the time in and" bit it's correct. It's just using the I from before. It's difficult to explain over the internet. Even so, there's no need to use correct grammar on the internet. In the real world of work and education it matters, but I'm pretty sure everyone knows what you mean on here.
    Okay thank you haha. I was completely baffled
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    One of the things that could make lit "hard" are the books/plays/poetry you study as if you don't enjoy them it can be hard work at times to revise for lit. We studied a fairly dull play for our exam which made it slightly harder to revise but my teacher made it as interesting as she could. For poetry we studied a poet that we used for GSCE and one I had never studied before, it depends how you feel about poetry, it can be hard to write about if you don't enjoy/understand it. For coursework we wrote a piece from one of two genres and compared them to work from an author in that genre which was quite good. For our other piece of coursework we studied a novel and some of the author's other work and I found that I enjoyed the context more than the novel itself and so found that "harder" to write about as I didn't enjoy the novel very much.
 
 
 
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