Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Anything that I need to know before I buy one?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    A what sorry?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Katie_p)
    A what sorry?
    A Katie...

    Ehm, I meant kitten :p:
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joyful_soul)
    A Katie...

    Ehm, I meant kitten :p:
    :O I'm not for sale!

    You'll probably find ads in local newspapers, otherwise try a local animal rescue shelter. At a rescue shelter they'll be able to give you good advice, and you can get a full-grown cat that might be house-trained (but don't always take their word for it) and will be less effort than a kitten, probably a better idea for your first cat!

    I don't think pet-shops in the UK sell cats, but they might have ads of people who do. If you do get a kitten, always ask to see the mother cat, in her "home" because you know if they've been kept in good conditions. I think it's less of a problem with cats than dogs (where puppy-farms are common and horrible) but still definitely worth checking.

    Get insurance, it's not fair to own a pet without, unless you can afford huge vets' bills, because if it gets ill and you can't pay, you'll dump it or put it up for rehoming. When you get insurance, check how long you can keep the policy - some are for life, some only until it's a certain age (think it might be 8 for cats?) and the life policies will be slightly more expensive, but much better. Cats can live to over twenty, so you want to make sure it's covered!
    Litter tray and kitty litter, look online for training methods for using it, it's years since I had a cat so I'm not sure what the requirements are.


    And finally, be sure that you can commit to having a cat before you get one. They need less attention than dogs, but if you live near busy roads, it might have to be a house cat, in which case you should be home a decent amount. You need to be able to afford its vets' bills, or insurance, food, bed etc. You need someone to look after it if you go on holiday (or a cattery you can put it in). If you live in rented accommodation, check you're allowed to get it. As I said, they can live for over twenty years, so if your circumstances will change drastically in the next few years, you might want to reconsider.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Katie_p)
    :O I'm not for sale!

    You'll probably find ads in local newspapers, otherwise try a local animal rescue shelter. At a rescue shelter they'll be able to give you good advice, and you can get a full-grown cat that might be house-trained (but don't always take their word for it) and will be less effort than a kitten, probably a better idea for your first cat!

    I don't think pet-shops in the UK sell cats, but they might have ads of people who do. If you do get a kitten, always ask to see the mother cat, in her "home" because you know if they've been kept in good conditions. I think it's less of a problem with cats than dogs (where puppy-farms are common and horrible) but still definitely worth checking.

    Get insurance, it's not fair to own a pet without, unless you can afford huge vets' bills, because if it gets ill and you can't pay, you'll dump it or put it up for rehoming. When you get insurance, check how long you can keep the policy - some are for life, some only until it's a certain age (think it might be 8 for cats?) and the life policies will be slightly more expensive, but much better. Cats can live to over twenty, so you want to make sure it's covered!
    Litter tray and kitty litter, look online for training methods for using it, it's years since I had a cat so I'm not sure what the requirements are.


    And finally, be sure that you can commit to having a cat before you get one. They need less attention than dogs, but if you live near busy roads, it might have to be a house cat, in which case you should be home a decent amount. You need to be able to afford its vets' bills, or insurance, food, bed etc. You need someone to look after it if you go on holiday (or a cattery you can put it in). If you live in rented accommodation, check you're allowed to get it. As I said, they can live for over twenty years, so if your circumstances will change drastically in the next few years, you might want to reconsider.

    Thank you, that's very helpful info.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joyful_soul)
    A Katie...
    Amsterdam

    (Original post by Joyful_soul)
    Ehm, I meant kitten
    Spoiler:
    Show
    On a serious note, just look online for private sellers or the nearest shelter.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Get one from a home.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 17, 2014
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
    AtCTs

    Ask the Community Team

    Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

    Welcome Lounge

    Welcome Lounge

    We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.