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Should organ donors be given preferential treatment if they need a transplant? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should organs go to people who they themselves are willing to donate?
    Yes
    9
    60.00%
    No
    6
    40.00%

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    i.e. should the government allow for hospitals to advertise organ donors as being more likely to receive a transplant, should they themselves need one?
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    No. You cannot ethically prioritise a patient in terms of what they have and have not signed up for; it should be judged on the nature of their condition. Organs should go to the ones most in need (who may have not signed up to the register on grounds like religion, never thinking about it, not knowing how serious it is to sign-up, etc), not whoever has ticked a box the government want them to. People who don't learn how to drive will not have automatically been sent the form and the card, and it's not something you think about in everyday life when you've got work, school, kids and whatever else going on; it simply won't cross a lot of people's minds at all. You don't randomly start thinking about ordering the card when you're in the middle of a shift or making dinner, and you don't think about the implications of needing a new organ until you actually need one.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    No. You cannot ethically prioritise a patient in terms of what they have and have not signed up for; it should be judged on the nature of their condition. Organs should go to the ones most in need (who may have not signed up to the register on grounds like religion, never thinking about it, not knowing how serious it is to sign-up, etc), not whoever has ticked a box the government want them to. People who don't learn how to drive will not have automatically been sent the form and the card, and it's not something you think about in everyday life when you've got work, school, kids and whatever else going on; it simply won't cross a lot of people's minds at all. You don't randomly start thinking about ordering the card when you're in the middle of a shift or making dinner, and you don't think about the implications of needing a new organ until you actually need one.
    I put yes. I feel, however, the ground is less black and white where I stand. Being on the organ donation register should give you a bit more precedence as I believe one should be rewarded for generosity. However, it should not be the only precursor for who gets the transplant. Criteria such as probability of survival, improvement to QOL, number of dependents, etc. should contest for importance too. Take into account all of the factors and then decide.

    Regarding your worries, I think it is a failure of the government/Department of Health that the awareness of organ donation isn't sufficient. Although a taboo, I think organ donation should be brought up in a professional environment such as GP appointments. Regarding religious factors, it is lamentable for people who are prohibited from organ donation, although only a small handful of religions prohibit it (e.g. Shintoism - a Far East religion); most religions such as Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism, etc. actually condone donating your organs to those in need.

    I feel organ donors need special treatment as an extra incentive for people to donate organs since the number of people waiting for a transplant are 3x greater than the number of organs donated. The deficit needs to be closed asap for me.
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    I would make a system where everyone past the age of 18 had to either opt in or opt out (e.g. to renew a passport or driving license), and those that opt out go straight to the bottom of the list.
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    (Original post by james22)
    I would make a system where everyone past the age of 18 had to either opt in or opt out (e.g. to renew a passport or driving license), and those that opt out go straight to the bottom of the list.
    It's good to make compulsory the choice for organ donation but I do feel like this is muscular liberalism. Pressurising people into a move they do not want to make and give them the illusion of choice. For example, what happens if a 20 year old who is thinking about becoming a donor has a family that do not want the person to become one as they cannot handle the thought of a loved one's body being ravaged. The 20 year old does care for their family's wishes and would influence his/her choice.
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    Wait a minute... the thread is called "Should organ donors be given preferential treatment if they need a transplant?", the poll says "Should organs go to people who they themselves are willing to donate?" - to me these are two different questions..

    It would be unfair to give organ donors preferential treatment if they needed one themselves. This would 'force' people into becoming a donor in fear they will die if something serious happens. People might have their own personal reasons not to become a donor and they have every right to do that.

    I think what they they did in Belgium is a lot better - everyone is automatically a donor, If you don't want to be a donor, you can opt out. I think this is more than fair as everyone would have been given every opportunity to opt out if they really wanted to.
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    (Original post by Pop_tart)
    Wait a minute... the thread is called "Should organ donors be given preferential treatment if they need a transplant?", the poll says "Should organs go to people who they themselves are willing to donate?" - to me these are two different questions..

    It would be unfair to give organ donors preferential treatment if they needed one themselves. This would 'force' people into becoming a donor in fear they will die if something serious happens. People might have their own personal reasons not to become a donor and they have every right to do that.

    I think what they they did in Belgium is a lot better - everyone is automatically a donor, If you don't want to be a donor, you can opt out. I think this is more than fair as everyone would have been given every opportunity to opt out if they really wanted to.
    People don't like that the state has presumed consent to your organs should you die. Questions of autonomy and family's wishes are other wrenches in the cogs.
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    (Original post by Devonshire-Delight)
    People don't like that the state has presumed consent to your organs should you die. Questions of autonomy and family's wishes are other wrenches in the cogs.
    If people don't like it they can opt out? I'd assume anyone over 18 or 21 would fall under the scheme so the moment you turn 18 or 21 you can opt out by filling in a form.

    Don't get me wrong, I totally see where you are coming from and I one for make your own decisions but in the grander scheme of things people will get over it - if this actually saves more lives I think it's worth getting a few people annoyed really.
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    (Original post by Pop_tart)
    If people don't like it they can opt out? I'd assume anyone over 18 or 21 would fall under the scheme so the moment you turn 18 or 21 you can opt out by filling in a form.

    Don't get me wrong, I totally see where you are coming from and I one for make your own decisions but in the grander scheme of things people will get over it - if this actually saves more lives I think it's worth getting a few people annoyed really.
    People might not like the idea of opting out due to the stigma/ guilt trips. I have seen on a few BBC forums on organ donations where people have explicitly stated that if the legislation changed to an opt-out basis, they would immediately opt out. Why that is, I do not know. Plus the fact that organ donors want the sentiment of giving organs out of charity and generosity rather than a obligatory duty. Governments don't necessarily introduce policies ideologically; rather they play a popularity contest. If it's grinding a few people's gears, the government will view this as votes lost.
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    (Original post by Devonshire-Delight)
    It's good to make compulsory the choice for organ donation but I do feel like this is muscular liberalism. Pressurising people into a move they do not want to make and give them the illusion of choice. For example, what happens if a 20 year old who is thinking about becoming a donor has a family that do not want the person to become one as they cannot handle the thought of a loved one's body being ravaged. The 20 year old does care for their family's wishes and would influence his/her choice.
    It is very hypocritical to accept donated organs but opt out of donating yourself (I did say this applies to those who have opted out, not those who haven't yet had the chance to decide). If this pressures more people into donating I only consider that a good thing.
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    (Original post by james22)
    It is very hypocritical to accept donated organs but opt out of donating yourself (I did say this applies to those who have opted out, not those who haven't yet had the chance to decide). If this pressures more people into donating I only consider that a good thing.
    Don't get me wrong, I'm all for more organ donations but I'm trying to identify hazards in the opt-out system so one can weigh up all the pros with the cons.
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    (Original post by Devonshire-Delight)
    Don't get me wrong, I'm all for more organ donations but I'm trying to identify hazards in the opt-out system so one can weigh up all the pros with the cons.
    I see no problem with a system like I have described, where you are forced to opt in or out when you get a passport or driving license (probably other ways to force it as well), and those who die before getting the chance to opt are assumed to have opted out, but don't get discriminated against when it comes to organ priority.
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    (Original post by james22)
    It is very hypocritical to accept donated organs but opt out of donating yourself (I did say this applies to those who have opted out, not those who haven't yet had the chance to decide). If this pressures more people into donating I only consider that a good thing.
    Sounds like illegitimate wangling to me in the same sense a charity fundraiser might emotionally blackmail a person to give money. Opt-out strips away the liberalism associated with today's society.
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    (Original post by Devonshire-Delight)
    Sounds like illegitimate wangling to me in the same sense a charity fundraiser might emotionally blackmail a person to give money. Opt-out strips away the liberalism associated with today's society.
    I don't really care if people end up donating organs when they don't want to because they felt pressured into doing it. I value human life way above making some people feel a bit better about themselves.
 
 
 
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