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How important is it to go to a Russell Group/top 10 university for WELL-PAID jobs? Watch

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    How relevant is going to a top 10 or top 15 university (i.e. firmly Russell Group) university in getting well-paid jobs, ultimately, and NOT JUST 'a job'/'employment', as is so vaguely spouted by many. Of course, you need to work for, I don't know, 10 or so years before you're in contention for a job that pays £75k+ or something like that. But, how much of a limitation is it if I end up at Manchester or even Southampton, as opposed to King's College or UCL? Could the answers please appreciate a range of well-paid jobs.

    I'm considering applying for Cass' IFRM course (AAA), for example, along with either Economics or Maths (or even Finance or Statistics) courses at university, provided I exceed AAA as part of the adjustment/possible gap year process I'm going to have to do next year, to get to a better university (current AS levels weren't great).
    Interested to know likewise!
    My uni is ranked poorly but is ranked no.1 in UK for my course!
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    Golden triangle any of those universities would give you an advantages as most big corporations/businesses target them to recruit potential candidates.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_...(universities)
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    For IB: Going to one of the target unis (which I believe are Oxbridge, Imperial, LSE, UCL and Warwick) is a distinct advantage.
    For MBB: You have to go to a really top uni like Oxford, LSE, Imperial etc. to have a shot.
    For top law firms: Oxbridge is always an advantage, but though there is sometimes a difference in preference between 2 other RG universities, attending any university of that calibre won't be a definite barrier. Which university you attend is but one of many factors.

    So for those professions, the university you attend is critical, but there are plenty of other high-paying careers where that's not the case.

    It should be noted that this is all based on hearsay and subjective evidence, and is not objective fact
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    So KCL would be pretty good? Say I bounced back next year, with my AS retakes, and I also did well in my A2s, and got A*AA or even A*A*A on results day 2015... I'd obviously use adjustment to try and get to a golden triangle university, and hopefully I'd get to KCL (I love the place and I know employment prospects should be just fine from there), but would it be wise to take a gap year if adjustment failed?

    I'm bloody terrified that me turning round my A levels and doing exceptionally well (thus showing the world that, yes, I got the damned grades) will STILL not see me getting a place at a genuine, TOP university (so top 7+).
    You do not necessarily have to go for the golden triangle, but they would definitely give you an advantage in certain professions. KCL is a good university again it entirely depends on what you intend to study. I'd advise you to do some research before picking what university you wish to attend.

    About your AS make sure you focus on that for now even if you fail to get the grades do not be discouraged. Quite a few universities outside the golden triangle are targeted by corporations/businesses.

    Goodluck
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    (Original post by Black Cat)
    Golden triangle any of those universities would give you an advantages as most big corporations/businesses target them to recruit potential candidates.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_...(universities)
    Kings gives an advanage over Warwick...? Whom for?
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    How relevant is going to a top 10 or top 15 university (i.e. firmly Russell Group) in getting well-paid jobs, ultimately, and NOT JUST 'a job'/'employment', as is so vaguely spouted by many. Of course, you need to work for, I don't know, 10 or so years before you're in contention for a job that pays £75k+ or something like that. But, how much of a limitation is it if I end up at Manchester or even Southampton, as opposed to King's College or UCL? Could the answers please appreciate a range of well-paid jobs.

    I'm considering applying for Cass' IFRM course (AAA), for example, along with either Economics or Maths (or even Finance or Statistics) courses at other universities (I'd preferably like to stay in London, so I may apply for not just one but two courses at KCL, which is where I may realistically have a chance of getting in, if I get A*AA). This is all if provided I do exceed AAA as part of the adjustment/possible gap year process I'm going to have to do next year, to get to a better university (current AS levels are not great).
    What industry would you like to work in OP?

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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    How relevant is going to a top 10 or top 15 university (i.e. firmly Russell Group) in getting well-paid jobs, ultimately, and NOT JUST 'a job'/'employment', as is so vaguely spouted by many. Of course, you need to work for, I don't know, 10 or so years before you're in contention for a job that pays £75k+ or something like that. But, how much of a limitation is it if I end up at Manchester or even Southampton, as opposed to King's College or UCL? Could the answers please appreciate a range of well-paid jobs.

    I'm considering applying for Cass' IFRM course (AAA), for example, along with either Economics or Maths (or even Finance or Statistics) courses at other universities (I'd preferably like to stay in London, so I may apply for not just one but two courses at KCL, which is where I may realistically have a chance of getting in, if I get A*AA). This is all if provided I do exceed AAA as part of the adjustment/possible gap year process I'm going to have to do next year, to get to a better university (current AS levels are not great).
    The uni is somewhat irrelavent. Its how good you are that matters. But if you cant get into the top 5 then that indicates you'll struggle to get into the top 5% of UK earners. Obviously you still can but the odds get much lower.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Kings gives an advanage over Warwick...? Whom for?
    In some ways it has advantages there some courses at Kings that are better than those at Warwick.

    Search it up through uni stat if you dont believe me.
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    (Original post by Black Cat)
    In some ways it has advantages there some courses at Kings that are better than those at Warwick.

    Search it up through uni stat if you dont believe me.
    I didnt say no courses were better at Kings.

    I asked which employers would prefer a Kings grad.

    Plate Glass unis ftw
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    I'd like to go into financial services or banking mainly. f I can't, then I'd like to go on to get top managerial jobs, or become a management consultant (they make £70k+).

    Also, I don't know which degree would be better for me to do... Economics, or Maths? I've made it clear to my school I want to do Economics, and that's probably going to come across in their references etc by now. But now I think I should do Maths instead... It's maths I actually enjoy, and I believe it's a degree that would make it more likely for me to get a well-paid job (£70k+), even if I went to an average university, as opposed to Economics.

    Besides, all I care about now is NOT getting to an average university. All I care about is getting to somewhere good. Of course it doesn't have to be the Golden Triangle. But I have to admit, I really DO want to stay in London, which means UCL, KCL or Cass Uni would be ideal. My full intention, and the only thing I can think about in life thee days, is to get A*AA or better next year (which would mean me getting to a top 10 university with adjustment or taking a gap year and reapplying the year after, hopefully).
    Whyd you want to work your ass off until you're 40 just to earn 70k? Life is for living, you'll waste the best years of your life chasing a very boring ambition.
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    I'd like to go into financial services or banking mainly. f I can't, then I'd like to go on to get top managerial jobs, or become a management consultant (they make £70k+).

    Also, I don't know which degree would be better for me to do... Economics, or Maths? I've made it clear to my school I want to do Economics, and that's probably going to come across in their references etc by now. But now I think I should do Maths instead... It's maths I actually enjoy, and I believe it's a degree that would make it more likely for me to get a well-paid job (£70k+), even if I went to an average university, as opposed to Economics.

    Besides, all I care about now is NOT getting to an average university. All I care about is getting to somewhere good. Of course it doesn't have to be the Golden Triangle. But I have to admit, I really DO want to stay in London, which means UCL, KCL or Cass Uni would be ideal. My full intention, and the only thing I can think about in life thee days, is to get A*AA or better next year (which would mean me getting to a top 10 university with adjustment or taking a gap year and reapplying the year after, hopefully).
    Okay, great. Will try and keep this simple.

    In short, for financial services and consulting, they do not care about university rankings - they know which ones they like, and they stick with it (for the most part). Generally speaking, they care about the overall reputation of the university rather than for specific subjects.

    For Investment Banking: for the best chance you need to go to: Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Imperial or Warwick (the target unis). Failing that, you should aim for: Bristol, Bath, Cass, Nottingham, York, Manchester, Durham, KCL or York (this will give you less chance but nonetheless, there is still a chance).

    For Consulting: for the best chance you need to go to either Oxbridge or LSE (if you want to work for MBB). If you want to do consulting at Big 4 or any other firm that is not MBB then get into any of the universities listed above.

    For Big 4: any of the universities aforementioned will give you a perfect chance however for more competitive roles such as Consulting and Corporate Finance you should aim as close as you can to IB targets.

    For Industry (Finance): again, for the top corporates you need to ideally go to Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick, Imperial or UCL but again the other unis will suffice in giving you a chance.

    ^ For any of the roles mentioned above, your degree is not given that much importance in that doing Economics or Maths will not give you a higher chance one way or the other. They are indifferent from an employment perspective so you should do what you prefer. However, during interviews, if you've studied Maths, they're more likely to ask you mathematical questions and vice-versa. And generally speaking, the lower-tier your university, then the more relevant/harder the subject you are studying should be.

    The other important point is your university will not carry as much as weight as YOU in terms of getting internships early-on, work experience, volunteering, and a truckload of ECs in leadership positions. University for the most part are just used for filtering and that is it.

    Hope that helps .

    Edit: Bear in mind, management consultants usually make 70k quite early on (depending on firm) and same for IB (even quicker) and to some extent Big 4 (bit slower). I know for example at Oliver Wyman, if you're good, you can make Partner in ten years (without doing an MBA) and they take home about 150-250k. Likewise, in IBD you'll be on six figures within 3/4 years of your career (if you last that long). Big 4 has much slower progression and you can probably hit 70k within 7-10 years if you're good and Partners make about 500-700k (same for MDs in IBs).

    Further Edit: I would not put too much emphasis on Golden Triangle to be honest. I've never seen anyone go "Wow, they go Golden Triangle, let's pick them" - it really does not work like that. Different firms have different universities they target more than others (even within the same industry) so it varies, it really is not a black and white thing.
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    How relevant is going to a top 10 or top 15 university (i.e. firmly Russell Group) in getting well-paid jobs, ultimately, and NOT JUST 'a job'/'employment', as is so vaguely spouted by many. Of course, you need to work for, I don't know, 10 or so years before you're in contention for a job that pays £75k+ or something like that. But, how much of a limitation is it if I end up at Manchester or even Southampton, as opposed to King's College or UCL? Could the answers please appreciate a range of well-paid jobs.

    I'm considering applying for Cass' IFRM course (AAA), for example, along with either Economics or Maths (or even Finance or Statistics) courses at other universities (I'd preferably like to stay in London, so I may apply for not just one but two courses at KCL, which is where I may realistically have a chance of getting in, if I get A*AA). This is all if provided I do exceed AAA as part of the adjustment/possible gap year process I'm going to have to do next year, to get to a better university (current AS levels are not great).
    Unless its medicine or dentistry, its very important.
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    How relevant is going to a top 10 or top 15 university (i.e. firmly Russell Group) in getting well-paid jobs, ultimately, and NOT JUST 'a job'/'employment', as is so vaguely spouted by many. Of course, you need to work for, I don't know, 10 or so years before you're in contention for a job that pays £75k+ or something like that. But, how much of a limitation is it if I end up at Manchester or even Southampton, as opposed to King's College or UCL? Could the answers please appreciate a range of well-paid jobs.

    I'm considering applying for Cass' IFRM course (AAA), for example, along with either Economics or Maths (or even Finance or Statistics) courses at other universities (I'd preferably like to stay in London, so I may apply for not just one but two courses at KCL, which is where I may realistically have a chance of getting in, if I get A*AA). This is all if provided I do exceed AAA as part of the adjustment/possible gap year process I'm going to have to do next year, to get to a better university (current AS levels are not great).
    Money is not everything
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    (Original post by Wisefire)
    Also, I don't know which degree would be better for me to do... Economics, or Maths? I've made it clear to my school I want to do Economics, and that's probably going to come across in their references etc by now. But now I think I should do Maths instead... It's maths I actually enjoy, and I believe it's a degree that would make it more likely for me to get a well-paid job (£70k+), even if I went to an average university, as opposed to Economics.
    You would be better off doing Film and Literature at Warwick than doing Mathematics at Sheffield.

    Terms like "G5" and "Golden Triangle" are being tossed around quite a lot here - unfortunately they aren't the best indication of university reputation in the eyes of employers. Nothing screams ignorance like spurting out these terms when someone asks about university prestige.
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    Not really. Look at the universities in my signature - yet I successfully worked in management consulting (one of the jobs being in the internal management consulting unit of a leading global investment bank, for that matter) and now I am an expat in Asia making ****loads on a 11% income tax rate... it's about your grades, awards/recommendations, CV and cover letter quality, and how good a talker you are in job interviews.
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    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    Not really. Look at the universities in my signature - yet I successfully worked in management consulting (one of the jobs being in the internal management consulting unit of a leading global investment bank, for that matter) and now I am an expat in Asia making ****loads on a 11% income tax rate... it's about your grades, awards/recommendations, CV and cover letter quality, and how good a talker you are in job interviews.
    With the greatest of respect, you are the exception, not the rule. You have to generalise when giving advice. But congratulations anyway.
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    Is it being at RG uni that matters or the a-level grades you recieve? Because I have an unconditional from a Russel group and may miss the standard offer by a grade.
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    (Original post by SamTheMan95)
    Is it being at RG uni that matters or the a-level grades you recieve? Because I have an unconditional from a Russel group and may miss the standard offer by a grade.
    Both.

    Employers filter by your grades and university.

    For example, if you got ABB but studied at Oxford you'd probably still be rejected on the basis you didn't meet the minimum UCAS requirement.

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    Pretty important, for most jobs its:

    Oxbridge
    =====
    IMPERIAL/UCL/LSE
    =====
    WARWICK
    =====
    KINGS/MANCHESTER/KCL
 
 
 
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