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    Hey guys I'll apologize in advance for making this post a bit long but I'd really appreciate some help and input here!

    I'd like to start off with telling you guys my situation. I'm doing my Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering at Newcastle University but after I graduate I want to do a second Bachelors in Physics at Durham University.

    So here's the problem.
    I went to high school in the US so when I applied to Newcastle University I had to take an International Foundation course before getting into Mechanical Engineering. I'm graduating next year and so far I've been getting a 2:1 (first and second year). The reason why I had to take a Foundation course was because I had no A level scores or anything else I could have used to apply to Universities. I've checked the Durham University school website and it showed the admissions requirements for US students and what I need are AP, SAT and SAT subject scores. To be honest I kind of slacked off in high school and my grades are complete rubbish! The international foundation programme gave me a second chance and I'm really thankful for that. I studied really hard and from not being very comfortable with simple Algebra, I'm now getting 2:1's for my grades! However the problem still remains; how can I apply to Durham University?

    So my questions are whether Durham University will consider me as an eligible candidate? Also, how hard is it to get into the Physics department at Durham University and how hard is it to get into Durham University itself? I really want to go to Durham University and I want to know what things I could do to increase my chances of getting accepted.

    Thank you all for reading this
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    Try emailing them and ask if they would accept a 2:1 in BSc Mechanical Engineering in lieu of the american high school diploma requirements. If not, they offer a BSc Physics with foundation course.
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    (Original post by flopsybunnybell)
    Try emailing them and ask if they would accept a 2:1 in BSc Mechanical Engineering in lieu of the american high school diploma requirements. If not, they offer a BSc Physics with foundation course.
    Thanks for your input. Actually I did email them last week but the office seems to be in vacation because an automated email was sent to me saying that the person in charge is out of the office.

    If you're a Physics student at Durham University, may I ask you how hard it usually is in your opinion to get into the department or university?
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    (Original post by piskantilia)
    Thanks for your input. Actually I did email them last week but the office seems to be in vacation because an automated email was sent to me saying that the person in charge is out of the office.

    If you're a Physics student at Durham University, may I ask you how hard it usually is in your opinion to get into the department or university?
    Only the University will be able to give you accurate advice on whether your qualifications are acceptable for entry. You can e-mail them at [email protected]. If you got a message from the Physics Department that they're out of office, it'll only be for a week or two at most as the Uni is open all through the summer vacation.

    Physics at Durham is very popular and competitive but that doesn't mean that your application wouldn't be a strong one. If you did well in the Foundation Year and in your degree, the Department would look carefully at that when they considered your application. You would need to demonstrate that you had the potential to do well on the course and that means that you would need to show evidence of having Maths and Physics knowledge at least equivalent to A-level otherwise you would struggle with the course but the Department can discuss this with you based on your current and past qualifications.

    You mention that you studied in the US. Are you an international student and therefore, do you need a visa to study? If so, there are Home Office restrictions on what you can study and for how long on a tier 4 visa so you really should contact the Uni, via the Admissions Office, as soon possible so someone can talk you through these.

    I hope that helps but do e-mail the address I gave you and I'm sure someone will be available to help with specific advice soon.
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    (Original post by Palatine)
    Only the University will be able to give you accurate advice on whether your qualifications are acceptable for entry. You can e-mail them at [email protected]. If you got a message from the Physics Department that they're out of office, it'll only be for a week or two at most as the Uni is open all through the summer vacation.

    Physics at Durham is very popular and competitive but that doesn't mean that your application wouldn't be a strong one. If you did well in the Foundation Year and in your degree, the Department would look carefully at that when they considered your application. You would need to demonstrate that you had the potential to do well on the course and that means that you would need to show evidence of having Maths and Physics knowledge at least equivalent to A-level otherwise you would struggle with the course but the Department can discuss this with you based on your current and past qualifications.

    You mention that you studied in the US. Are you an international student and therefore, do you need a visa to study? If so, there are Home Office restrictions on what you can study and for how long on a tier 4 visa so you really should contact the Uni, via the Admissions Office, as soon possible so someone can talk you through these.

    I hope that helps but do e-mail the address I gave you and I'm sure someone will be available to help with specific advice soon.
    Thanks, I guess the only way to know for sure is to wait for the University to reply back. Yes, I do need a visa but should I talk about the visa situation with my current university or Durham University?
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    email them. the door won't open if you don't knock.
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    Phone the undergraduate admissions office. It is always better to speak to somebody in person.

    I start the BSc Physics with Foundation Year, in October this year. Which means that if you are successful, we will be studying Physics together, if you plan on starting your degree in the academic year 2015/2016.

    As another user said brush up on the areas of physics you don't know upto A2 standard. Such as Nuclear, Energy, Particle, Waves, Light & Lasers, Thermodynamics, etc.

    On your personal statement show a passion for Physics, explain why you want to study it, and where you see it taking you in the future. Read up on the field, pop science books are great for an entry level understanding and knowledge base. Probably the two best books to read and work through are The Theoretical Minimum (this book covers Newtonian Mechanics), and The Theoretical Minimum - Quantum Mechanics, by Leonard Susskind.

    Your previous degree should more than cover the admission pre-requisites for the course.

    Good luck!!

    Let me know how you get on.
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    (Original post by cem101)
    email them. the door won't open if you don't knock.
    I did email them last week but I think I'll have to wait a while to get a response from them...
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    (Original post by MrEFeynman)
    Phone the undergraduate admissions office. It is always better to speak to somebody in person.

    I start the BSc Physics with Foundation Year, in October this year. Which means that if you are successful, we will be studying Physics together, if you plan on starting your degree in the academic year 2015/2016.

    As another user said brush up on the areas of physics you don't know upto A2 standard. Such as Nuclear, Energy, Particle, Waves, Light & Lasers, Thermodynamics, etc.

    On your personal statement show a passion for Physics, explain why you want to study it, and where you see it taking you in the future. Read up on the field, pop science books are great for an entry level understanding and knowledge base. Probably the two best books to read and work through are The Theoretical Minimum (this book covers Newtonian Mechanics), and The Theoretical Minimum - Quantum Mechanics, by Leonard Susskind.

    Your previous degree should more than cover the admission pre-requisites for the course.

    Good luck!!

    Let me know how you get on.
    Wow thanks, I'll take a look at the literature you recommended. Hopefully I will start in 2015 and be able to study in the same class as you!
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    (Original post by piskantilia)
    Thanks, I guess the only way to know for sure is to wait for the University to reply back. Yes, I do need a visa but should I talk about the visa situation with my current university or Durham University?
    Talk to either university about the visa issue or contact UKCISA.org.uk

    There are two restrictions you need to find out about. The first is academic progression. The Home Office expects students to progress academically and so usually expect them to go from an undergraduate degree to a taught masters and then to a research degree. If you're graduating with an undergraduate degree (so if you complete your current course), you'll need to be able to demonstrate that what is effectively a step-back in level (to year 1 undergraduate) represents academic progression for you.

    In addition to academic progression, the Home Office restricts the number of years you can study on a Tier 4 (General) Student visa as an adult (over 18) at degree level (the cap is usually 5 years). You can find information on this on the UKCISA website (www.ukcisa.org.uk/International-Students/Immigration-/Making-a-Tier-4-General-application-in-the-UK/Time-limit-cap-on-study/#). The rules are quite complicated so before you make an application, you should seek advice from an immigration expert.

    Sorry, I know this isn't what you first asked about but it is worth finding out as much as you can now to avoid disappointment later. Best of luck!
 
 
 
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