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Restarting an instrument after a really long time? Advice? Watch

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    Recently I've been inspired to start learning an instrument again. I'm 18 at the moment, but I know people always say that you should do these things whilst quite young as it's easier to pick things up.

    A bit of background info: I played the violin for about 5 years when I was younger (passed Grade 4 with a merit) and I also played the flute for 3 or so years and did my Grade 3. However, it's been about 5 years since I picked up an instrument and I've completely forgotten how to read music

    Ideally, I'd like to start the violin again or alternatively begin something completely new. So I guess my question is how practical would it be?

    Thanks for reading if you got this far
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    (Original post by Nehemia)
    Recently I've been inspired to start learning an instrument again. I'm 18 at the moment, but I know people always say that you should do these things whilst quite young as it's easier to pick things up.

    A bit of background info: I played the violin for about 5 years when I was younger (passed Grade 4 with a merit) and I also played the flute for 3 or so years and did my Grade 3. However, it's been about 5 years since I picked up an instrument and I've completely forgotten how to read music

    Ideally, I'd like to start the violin again or alternatively begin something completely new. So I guess my question is how practical would it be?

    Thanks for reading if you got this far
    Why don't you start from the basics again on whichever you choose (or both!) which will help with the reading music thing and technique- hopefully you'll progress a lot quicker than last time as it comes back to you. I'm sure you'll probably be surprised at how fast you can get back up to a similar standard to last time! Good luck )


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    (Original post by furryface12)
    Why don't you start from the basics again on whichever you choose (or both!) which will help with the reading music thing and technique- hopefully you'll progress a lot quicker than last time as it comes back to you. I'm sure you'll probably be surprised at how fast you can get back up to a similar standard to last time! Good luck )


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    Sounds like a good idea, thanks

    Do you think it'll be worth getting a teacher? I know I'll probably sound like a strangled cat at first :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Nehemia)
    Sounds like a good idea, thanks

    Do you think it'll be worth getting a teacher? I know I'll probably sound like a strangled cat at first :rolleyes:
    Probably a good idea to start off with to avoid getting into bad habits, even if you then decide to carry on on your own after a couple of months. Personally I think flute is much better than violin, but of course I'm not biased at all


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    I get so depressed when I see people in their thirties or twenties worrying if they can still learn something as they are no longer young ... but for an 18 year old to think along those lines is ridiculous.

    You are probably too old to become a ballet dancer or international gymnast, or world-class in any pursuit where the body needs to be moulded while it is young, but other activities, like playing an instrument, are mostly about training the mind. All the latest research shows that the brain and nervous system are very plastic and adaptable and capable of learning new skills to a high standard right through life.

    There is huge prejudice in the classical music world in favour of prodigies, and the former prodigies would like to scare away competition by having you believe that if you did not start young you have no chance, but they are wrong and you should ignore them, and also avoid any so-called teacher that subtly passes on the same belief to their students.

    You may be at a disadvantage compared to someone that started at 5, but if they can reach a professional standard by their early 20's then you could, if you wanted, reach a professional standard by your mid-30's, if not sooner. And if you are happy to play at an amateur level then there is even less reason to put off your musical journey.

    Besides, if this is what you want to do, when else are you going to have the chance? Unless you think that you will can try again when you have been re-incarnated, or are going to heaven where you can practice for eternity.
 
 
 
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