Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

When should a "miscommunication" be penalised? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I've noticed that whenever there's something bad going on at work, the most popular conclusion of the problem is a miscommunication problem and the problem seems miniscule after that. Although it's a valid conclusion, it seems that the party who did the problem has never gotten any ramification after that, no matter how bad the impact of the problem seems to be.

    I wonder, when does a miscommunication problem conclusion becomes invalid and when does it require for someone to be penalised for it?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    yes
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I think it is just one of those words people use to try to avoid facing the real issue. Rather than nipping the real issue in the bud, you get the same excuses.

    Miscommunication, lack of experience, poor training, personal issues, under pressure, bad day... in isolation all valid reasons, but sometimes someone made a mistake and is trying to avoid responsibility.

    And it happens more in large corporations.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by addylad)
    I think it is just one of those words people use to try to avoid facing the real issue. Rather than nipping the real issue in the bud, you get the same excuses.

    Miscommunication, lack of experience, poor training, personal issues, under pressure, bad day... in isolation all valid reasons, but sometimes someone made a mistake and is trying to avoid responsibility.

    And it happens more in large corporations.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Does it matter, as long as no one is killed, why make a **** hole of a rate dropping?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Sometimes you get horrible psychopaths at work, but until you actually acknowledge it in a formal setting, only then do they check their behavior to protect their self interest. The reality is that an employer would rather modify a situation rather than fire somebody which is more drastic and complex.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I would say that the priority in the case of an instance of miscommunication should be to atrophy by a decisive and conclusive course of action any ripple effects created while it has the least possible potentiality for negative ramifications which may result as a consequence of the aforementioned course of action or the original miscommunication. In order to do this it is necessary that the party responsible for any ambiguous or otherwise intentionally or non-intentionally ineffective communication should be informed in the strongest possible terms that such a mistake should be subject to preventative measures before it happens, and steps should be taken to apply damage control in the immediate aftermath, and subsequently further preventative initiatives should be applied with an eye to averting such incidents thereafter.

    Or, of course, everyone could just stop using all of this ridiculous office-speak, and maybe miscommunications would occur less often. This a thread is meaningless without an example of the vague concept of 'miscommunication', though in my limited experience it's usually a result of poor organisation on the part of management and inability to use simple English and carry out simple actions.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I don't believe errors should necessarily attract penalties, punishments or blame-seeking. You don't sniff around for weeks trying to find someone to blame, you sort it out so it doesn't happen again (penalties being a potential eventual solution).

    Most work mistakes are just that. Mistakes. And everyone makes them. There's a fine balance between ****ing up your relationship with the workforce by being too much of a blame-culture ****, and letting the workforce take the piss because you let everything go. I remember one of my old bosses losing our best programmer by witch-hunting him and having him officially 'investigated' because he made a small maths error on a test form which hadn't even gone live yet. He felt disrespected, lost the desire to work for the company and left the following week. A better solution in that scenario is installing a simple check by someone else into the procedure before something goes live, and accept that everyone makes the odd mistake.

    Of course, if someone repeatedly disregards a particular rule/law, then you do need to deal in consequences rather than just look at solutions. But it's a difficult line to draw.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by layahudi)
    Does it matter, as long as no one is killed, why make a **** hole of a rate dropping?
    What are you on about?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by addylad)
    I think it is just one of those words people use to try to avoid facing the real issue. Rather than nipping the real issue in the bud, you get the same excuses.

    Miscommunication, lack of experience, poor training, personal issues, under pressure, bad day... in isolation all valid reasons, but sometimes someone made a mistake and is trying to avoid responsibility.

    And it happens more in large corporations.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yes. And I'm not sure how to ensure accountability with these type of people.

    (Original post by sunnydespair)
    Sometimes you get horrible psychopaths at work, but until you actually acknowledge it in a formal setting, only then do they check their behavior to protect their self interest. The reality is that an employer would rather modify a situation rather than fire somebody which is more drastic and complex.
    How do you mean acknowledge here?

    (Original post by russellsteapot)
    I don't believe errors should necessarily attract penalties, punishments or blame-seeking. You don't sniff around for weeks trying to find someone to blame, you sort it out so it doesn't happen again (penalties being a potential eventual solution).

    Most work mistakes are just that. Mistakes. And everyone makes them. There's a fine balance between ****ing up your relationship with the workforce by being too much of a blame-culture ****, and letting the workforce take the piss because you let everything go. I remember one of my old bosses losing our best programmer by witch-hunting him and having him officially 'investigated' because he made a small maths error on a test form which hadn't even gone live yet. He felt disrespected, lost the desire to work for the company and left the following week. A better solution in that scenario is installing a simple check by someone else into the procedure before something goes live, and accept that everyone makes the odd mistake.

    Of course, if someone repeatedly disregards a particular rule/law, then you do need to deal in consequences rather than just look at solutions. But it's a difficult line to draw.
    True. I'd really like to know how we'd enforce accountability on this one. Even from my experience, my team was falling apart because of the amount of miscommunication occurring and it didn't help at all that the head can't speak a word of English.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    [QUOTE=kka25;48638442]Yes. And I'm not sure how to ensure accountability with these type of people.



    How do you mean acknowledge here?

    To acknowledge, I think you need to make a formal complaint to a senior who will then try to mediate the situation
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunnydespair)
    To acknowledge, I think you need to make a formal complaint to a senior who will then try to mediate the situation
    Have you worked for a large company?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by addylad)
    Have you worked for a large company?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yep
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 22, 2014
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
    Bizarre things students have spent their loans onThings you should budget for at uni

    Sponsored features:

    Making money from your own website

    Need some cash?

    How to make money running your own website.

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.