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    Hi,
    I am writing from Ireland. I have been a full time private music teacher for 5 yrs and am considering moving to the UK to train as a language teacher for second level. I've had a look at the government websites regarding salary etc but would love to get some advise from experienced teachers. I see that the starting salary can be just under £22,000 and that worries me. I love teaching and am really passionate about moving forward but I am literally wondering if I'll be ok money wise?
    For example, what is the average amount of time before a new teacher can expect their salary to rise...I know that the cost of living in the UK is expensive (my brother is there) and that worries me when I think ahead of applying for a mortgage...all that kind of thing.
    Also, are teachers offered permanency? I spoke to a teacher here about trying to get a permanent position in Ireland and the exact phrase she used was "in order to get permanency you literally have to wait for someone to die!"
    I hope I am not giving the impression that I'm interested in teaching just for the money....far from it...but I am in my 30's, and at some point I would like to got a mortgage and all that.
    I could ask lots of my questions....but would be grateful of any advise you have for me

    p.s. I'm a country girl so wont be moving into a big city
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Hi,
    I am writing from Ireland. I have been a full time private music teacher for 5 yrs and am considering moving to the UK to train as a language teacher for second level. I've had a look at the government websites regarding salary etc but would love to get some advise from experienced teachers. I see that the starting salary can be just under £22,000 and that worries me. I love teaching and am really passionate about moving forward but I am literally wondering if I'll be ok money wise?
    For example, what is the average amount of time before a new teacher can expect their salary to rise...I know that the cost of living in the UK is expensive (my brother is there) and that worries me when I think ahead of applying for a mortgage...all that kind of thing.
    Also, are teachers offered permanency? I spoke to a teacher here about trying to get a permanent position in Ireland and the exact phrase she used was "in order to get permanency you literally have to wait for someone to die!"
    I hope I am not giving the impression that I'm interested in teaching just for the money....far from it...but I am in my 30's, and at some point I would like to got a mortgage and all that.
    I could ask lots of my questions....but would be grateful of any advise you have for me

    p.s. I'm a country girl so wont be moving into a big city
    Hi,

    For secondary languages there are generally plenty of jobs available - everyone who trained on my course last year was successful in obtaining a post for their NQT year.

    If you live and work in a cheap area, a mortgage is possible. One of my friends from the PGCE got a mortgage straight away, just on her initial teaching salary. So it is doable, if you already have savings for the deposit (or have family who can help you out). Otherwise you'd need to save for quite a few years I'd've thought. But the key thing is to be in an area where housing is affordable. I'm in the East Midlands and will be looking to buy a house in the next year or two as house prices aren't too bad here.

    There are lots of temporary/short-term posts but I wouldn't say permanent posts are as hard to get as the person you spoke to said. Many people on my course went straight into a permanent position after their teacher training. I got a 1-year temporary post but a few months ago I reapplied for my post and how have a permanent contract.

    Good luck!
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    Permanent post are not always the norm. Schools are increasingly making one year temporary contracts with them being made permanent at the end if there have been no problems.
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    thanks so much for the advise!it certainly sounds like a better situation them is in the republic of ireland.as my degree is in media production,its a little tricky getting a pgce course for english but got some positive feedback yesterday from a course provider so fingers crossed! eventually id like to teach english,german and spanish...but one step at a time.my mum asked me this morning....after u qualify,when u hit t job market....r u going t b in a weak position without an english degree?? got me thinking....if i get t pgce n english without having a strongly relevant degree....could i likely find myself in a difficult position? yes ive lots of teaching experience with music but i wonder?
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Permanent post are not always the norm. Schools are increasingly making one year temporary contracts with them being made permanent at the end if there have been no problems.
    That actually doesn't sound so bad to me, Here in Ireland its really difficult to get permanency..there are 5 levels of "Non-Permanent" positions, and it takes years to get through them!
    Thanks for the heads up :-)
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Hi,

    For secondary languages there are generally plenty of jobs available - everyone who trained on my course last year was successful in obtaining a post for their NQT year.

    If you live and work in a cheap area, a mortgage is possible. One of my friends from the PGCE got a mortgage straight away, just on her initial teaching salary. So it is doable, if you already have savings for the deposit (or have family who can help you out). Otherwise you'd need to save for quite a few years I'd've thought. But the key thing is to be in an area where housing is affordable. I'm in the East Midlands and will be looking to buy a house in the next year or two as house prices aren't too bad here.

    There are lots of temporary/short-term posts but I wouldn't say permanent posts are as hard to get as the person you spoke to said. Many people on my course went straight into a permanent position after their teacher training. I got a 1-year temporary post but a few months ago I reapplied for my post and how have a permanent contract.

    Good luck!
    Congrats on getting permanency :-)
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    That actually doesn't sound so bad to me, Here in Ireland its really difficult to get permanency..there are 5 levels of "Non-Permanent" positions, and it takes years to get through them!
    Thanks for the heads up :-)
    Don't be afraid to apply for a post because it's only temporary. It's often just probation in another guise.
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    thanks so much for the advise!it certainly sounds like a better situation them is in the republic of ireland.as my degree is in media production,its a little tricky getting a pgce course for english but got some positive feedback yesterday from a course provider so fingers crossed! eventually id like to teach english,german and spanish...but one step at a time.my mum asked me this morning....after u qualify,when u hit t job market....r u going t b in a weak position without an english degree?? got me thinking....if i get t pgce n english without having a strongly relevant degree....could i likely find myself in a difficult position? yes ive lots of teaching experience with music but i wonder?
    Hmm, this sounds more complicated than I thought.

    When applying for a PGCE, they expect 50% of your degree to have been in the subject you want to teach. For example, I have a joint honours degree in French and History (50:50 split) so I could have done a PGCE in either of those subjects (I did Modern Foreign Languages focusing on French, and now teach mostly French with a little Spanish).

    English PGCEs are notoriously competitive so you will struggle to get a place without a degree in English (or 50:50 English and another subject). There are also a lot of applicants for English teaching posts after you qualify.

    Some subjects (Modern Foreign Languages, Maths, Science (particularly Physics)) are "shortage subjects" where there are more places available and there are generous bursaries to attract candidates. There are also plenty of jobs for these subjects. But English is not one of these areas.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Hmm, this sounds more complicated than I thought.

    When applying for a PGCE, they expect 50% of your degree to have been in the subject you want to teach. For example, I have a joint honours degree in French and History (50:50 split) so I could have done a PGCE in either of those subjects (I did Modern Foreign Languages focusing on French, and now teach mostly French with a little Spanish).

    English PGCEs are notoriously competitive so you will struggle to get a place without a degree in English (or 50:50 English and another subject). There are also a lot of applicants for English teaching posts after you qualify.

    Some subjects (Modern Foreign Languages, Maths, Science (particularly Physics)) are "shortage subjects" where there are more places available and there are generous bursaries to attract candidates. There are also plenty of jobs for these subjects. But English is not one of these areas.
    Hi,
    Thanks so much for your honesty. Although I've read on a few sites that English is a "shortage subject"...I suspected that it was not as in demand as the subjects you've named above.
    I also have another option of doing a degree here in Ireland in German and Spanish...which are two languages I love, and have been studying at home for a year...its just the time scale...Here I would have to do the degree and then a further 2 years postgrad to qualify...I'm up for the challenge but obviously the idea of doing just a year in the UK and then "Subject refresher course" in German and Spanish after looks tempting...
    I could always do the degree here and then head over for the one year PGCE in modern languages? In the big scheme of things is one or two years extra study that big a deal?
    I guess its most important to really consider all my options as whatever decision I make...its for the long term.
    Do you have any thoughts on which is more in demand..German or Spanish...maybe its about the same?
    Thanks again for your feedback, I REALLY do appreciate it
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Hi,
    Thanks so much for your honesty. Although I've read on a few sites that English is a "shortage subject"...I suspected that it was not as in demand as the subjects you've named above.
    I also have another option of doing a degree here in Ireland in German and Spanish...which are two languages I love, and have been studying at home for a year...its just the time scale...Here I would have to do the degree and then a further 2 years postgrad to qualify...I'm up for the challenge but obviously the idea of doing just a year in the UK and then "Subject refresher course" in German and Spanish after looks tempting...
    I could always do the degree here and then head over for the one year PGCE in modern languages? In the big scheme of things is one or two years extra study that big a deal?
    I guess its most important to really consider all my options as whatever decision I make...its for the long term.
    Do you have any thoughts on which is more in demand..German or Spanish...maybe its about the same?
    Thanks again for your feedback, I REALLY do appreciate it
    Spanish is most in demand. German is in decline in most schools, Spanish is on the increase (and for this reason teachers in more demand as there aren't as many teachers who can teach Spanish compared to how many schools want to offer it). French is fairly stable.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Spanish is most in demand. German is in decline in most schools, Spanish is on the increase (and for this reason teachers in more demand as there aren't as many teachers who can teach Spanish compared to how many schools want to offer it). French is fairly stable.
    Interesting, I've spoken to a few German teachers in Ireland and it seems although French is the most popular subject, (German has about 1/3 of the amount of students compared to French) there is a scarcity of qualified German teachers! I'm also told by a head master and another teacher that Spanish is on the up...although there are many teachers in Ireland now that find it difficult to get work...this is likely to change in the next decade...as birth rates have increased and languages are more and more seen as essential subjects.
    One German teacher told me that if I choose German I'l never be out of work and can give German grinds and use the language for working in other industries also.
    How do UK teachers feel about their salaries and conditions? I've notice that there has been a few strikes and that many teachers are not happy with their allowances...especially in London?
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Interesting, I've spoken to a few German teachers in Ireland and it seems although French is the most popular subject, (German has about 1/3 of the amount of students compared to French) there is a scarcity of qualified German teachers! I'm also told by a head master and another teacher that Spanish is on the up...although there are many teachers in Ireland now that find it difficult to get work...this is likely to change in the next decade...as birth rates have increased and languages are more and more seen as essential subjects.
    One German teacher told me that if I choose German I'l never be out of work and can give German grinds and use the language for working in other industries also.
    How do UK teachers feel about their salaries and conditions? I've notice that there has been a few strikes and that many teachers are not happy with their allowances...especially in London?
    I've seen very few German jobs advertised. When I applied for my PGCE they were more interested in me being able to offer Spanish than German, despite the fact that I have slightly higher qualifications in German. A lot of schools have French as the main language and Spanish as the second, where formerly it would have been German as the second language. In others, Spanish is the main language with French second.

    The big change in pay and conditions at the moment is Performance Related Pay - whether you go up the pay scale or not is based on your appraisal. You can also apply to jump higher up the pay scale if you meet the criteria for higher pay (my school has descriptors of what a new teacher, established teacher, expert teacher, etc. is like) but they can turn this down. We don't really know exactly how it's going to pan out. In some schools it might mean not a lot changes - most teachers continue doing their job well and get small annual payrises for the first few years. But in some schools it may mean the head deliberately setting difficult targets so people fail their appraisals and don't get a pay rise. There are lots of stories about more experienced (and therefore more expensive) teachers being bullied out of the profession to save money.
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    Thats terrible, and I can see why teachers are frustrated! At the end of the day each students "success" should be about what they can personally achieve..whats best for them..not just numbers....personal circumstances always play a role...its quite sad really
 
 
 
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