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    I'm currently holding an offer for Law at Oxford on the condition I get at least AAA in my A Levels. During my exam period I wasn't in the best place emotionally - my grandfather was hospitalized with severe heart problems through most of June. The doctors made it clear that if he wasn't already in hospital when his heart went from VT to VF then he would not have survived. From 8th-25th of June he had more than 20 serious VT events, his survival was in serious doubt and the doctors could not diagnose the cause until after my final exam. He's recovering now after heart surgery to fit a defibrillator so he should hopefully be fine (thank goodness). I'm extremely close with my grandfather and while I did the best I could, him almost dying and suffering further life-threatening heart problems on a daily basis pretty much drove all thoughts of A Levels and exams from my mind.

    My school has written a letter to my college explaining what I was going through but I'm terrified I'll miss my offer, especially as my school never sends anyone to Oxford or Cambridge and they are all so proud of me. Does anyone know how lenient Oxford are with emotional distress during exams?
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    (Original post by Talks4England)
    I'm currently holding an offer for Law at Oxford on the condition I get at least AAA in my A Levels. During my exam period I wasn't in the best place emotionally - my grandfather was hospitalized with severe heart problems through most of June. The doctors made it clear that if he wasn't already in hospital when his heart went from VT to VF then he would not have survived. From 8th-25th of June he had more than 20 serious VT events, his survival was in serious doubt and the doctors could not diagnose the cause until after my final exam. He's recovering now after heart surgery to fit a defibrillator so he should hopefully be fine (thank goodness). I'm extremely close with my grandfather and while I did the best I could, him almost dying and suffering further life-threatening heart problems on a daily basis pretty much drove all thoughts of A Levels and exams from my mind.

    My school has written a letter to my college explaining what I was going through but I'm terrified I'll miss my offer, especially as my school never sends anyone to Oxford or Cambridge and they are all so proud of me. Does anyone know how lenient Oxford are with emotional distress during exams?
    Your school should have made a claim for extenuating circumstances in respect of your A level performance. You are "double dipping" if you then want extenuating circumstances in respect of grades that have already taken into account your extenuating circumstances.
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    (Original post by Talks4England)
    I'm currently holding an offer for Law at Oxford on the condition I get at least AAA in my A Levels. During my exam period I wasn't in the best place emotionally - my grandfather was hospitalized with severe heart problems through most of June. The doctors made it clear that if he wasn't already in hospital when his heart went from VT to VF then he would not have survived. From 8th-25th of June he had more than 20 serious VT events, his survival was in serious doubt and the doctors could not diagnose the cause until after my final exam. He's recovering now after heart surgery to fit a defibrillator so he should hopefully be fine (thank goodness). I'm extremely close with my grandfather and while I did the best I could, him almost dying and suffering further life-threatening heart problems on a daily basis pretty much drove all thoughts of A Levels and exams from my mind.

    My school has written a letter to my college explaining what I was going through but I'm terrified I'll miss my offer, especially as my school never sends anyone to Oxford or Cambridge and they are all so proud of me. Does anyone know how lenient Oxford are with emotional distress during exams?
    I'm sorry you had to go through that, even without the added stress of your exams.

    You've done the right thing in getting in touch with your college this early on. It's hard to give you a definite answer, especially without your A-level results. I'm afraid it's likely a waiting game until A level results day. They will however look at you circumstances and treat them seriously.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Your school should have made a claim for extenuating circumstances in respect of your A level performance. You are "double dipping" if you then want extenuating circumstances in respect of grades that have already taken into account your extenuating circumstances.
    Actually my school never told the exam boards about my circumstances so my grades will not be taking them into account - I was advised that writing to the college would be the best form of action so that is all that the school has done.

    (Original post by KombatWombat)
    I'm sorry you had to go through that, even without the added stress of your exams.

    You've done the right thing in getting in touch with your college this early on. It's hard to give you a definite answer, especially without your A-level results. I'm afraid it's likely a waiting game until A level results day. They will however look at you circumstances and treat them seriously.
    Thank you. I guess all I can do now is wait and hope for the best when results day comes...
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    (Original post by Talks4England)
    Actually my school never told the exam boards about my circumstances so my grades will not be taking them into account - I was advised that writing to the college would be the best form of action so that is all that the school has done.

    .
    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    ...
    :hello:

    Is this in any way salvageable with the exam board?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    :hello:

    Is this in any way salvageable with the exam board?
    Nope. In any case, the maximum allowed is 5% for the death of a parent in the immediate period before the exam and it's on a sliding scale down from that, so there wouldn't be much going for this. The boards are very cagey about what they do, and they don't inform schools how much has been awarded, other than by putting an asterisk at the side of the candidate's name on the results sheet, but what is pretty certain is that they don't give any slack to people applying for special consideration months after. The school could try contacting the university, if there is someone in authority willing to do so, but once again, in the scheme of things I'm afraid this kind of circumstance cuts little ice, as it's all too common.
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    Thanks for the advice guys, as it turned out I exceeded my offer (Phew!) and therefore my college didn't need to consider the extenuating circumstances after all
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    (Original post by Talks4England)
    Thanks for the advice guys, as it turned out I exceeded my offer (Phew!) and therefore my college didn't need to consider the extenuating circumstances after all
    Well, that's very good news. Well done.
 
 
 
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