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15 year old buying a car? Watch

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    i have a bit of money i have saved up and turn 15 next month. just what to know what you think about me buying a little car such as a vw lupo. i would want to spend about £700 and would want something similar to this

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/VW-Lupo-1-...item3a941da1ba

    i wouldnt mind working on it and would also learn to drive in it and use it as my first car in 2 years time.

    my mum would be insured on it for now while its on the drive.

    my question is, should i buy one? will i have many problems with it? (this particular one does have a long mot however) and are 15 year olds allowed to take cars to track days?

    i believe having this car and working on it as a hobby is much better than playing on my playstation all day

    thanks in advance and only comment if you want to help not tell me its a ridiculous idea and whatever.
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    you can buy one, i remember a guy i know bought a car at 15 a nissan micra, he wasnt ensured and didnt pay tax, drive off without paying feul, and when the police stopped him after 8 months he just jumped out and ran away
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    (Original post by aka r)
    you can buy one, i remember a guy i know bought a car at 15 a nissan micra, he wasnt ensured and didnt pay tax, drive off without paying feul, and when the police stopped him after 8 months he just jumped out and ran away
    hahaha not the sort of thing i want to do, wouldnt drive it on roads ect
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    With all due respect, why?

    You can't drive it, track days won't let you

    It'd be better use of your time/money to hire a car or lessons at places for under 18s

    Or save more cash until you are 17
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    No point. You can't drive it for 2 years and in that time it'll lose value, MOT, tax and in 2 years time the better/nicer cars will be cheaper.
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    (Original post by ChrisHarris1)
    With all due respect, why?

    You can't drive it, track days won't let you

    It'd be better use of your time/money to hire a car or lessons at places for under 18s

    Or save more cash until you are 17
    I agree.
    And in 2 years time when you do come to buy a car, you might be able to buy something better with your money.
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    Mate, if you want to buy it go for it. It's never too early to work on a car if you want. There's a place called Cardrome in Essex, which is basically a private road complex. You can learn to drive there without a licence.
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    (Original post by The Jargen)
    Mate, if you want to buy it go for it. It's never too early to work on a car if you want. There's a place called Cardrome in Essex, which is basically a private road complex. You can learn to drive there without a licence.
    ye but what exactly could he "work on" ?

    I'm all for him taking lessons at private places

    however it'd be a better spend of time/money waiting until he is 17
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    (Original post by ChrisHarris1)
    ye but what exactly could he "work on" ?

    I'm all for him taking lessons at private places

    however it'd be a better spend of time/money waiting until he is 17
    Taking things apart an putting them back together again, it helps to learn.

    You can also see it this way, the expense he pays now, he won't have to pay later.
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    (Original post by The Jargen)
    Taking things apart an putting them back together again, it helps to learn.

    You can also see it this way, the expense he pays now, he won't have to pay later.
    this is what i would do, and clean everything up whilst i do it
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    (Original post by ChrisHarris1)
    With all due respect, why?

    You can't drive it, track days won't let you

    It'd be better use of your time/money to hire a car or lessons at places for under 18s

    Or save more cash until you are 17
    Yes you can go on track days..........
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    (Original post by Friggerpants)
    Yes you can go on track days..........
    To clarify, I meant no track will allow his own car due to his age

    how would he transport it there?

    By all means buy a really cheap car for £200-300 but no more
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    (Original post by ChrisHarris1)
    To clarify, I meant no track will allow his own car due to his age

    how would he transport it there?

    By all means buy a really cheap car for £200-300 but no more
    And to clarify, yes he can.

    Have you ever been on a proper track day (Not a lambo experience for 2 laps at partial throttle)?

    Plenty of people come with cars that aren't road legal on trailers.........
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    My contention was his age would be the limiting factor, not the car

    The T&C's when I look at "bring your own car" trackdays, is usually no under 16s as drivers

    I have been to a Track Day in my friends Porsche, and as I said, the only rules I saw was that of age (due to insurance I guess?)

    Can you show me a link to somewhere like Oulton Park that allows under 16s in their own vehicle? (don't mean that to sound confrontational, I genuinely would be interested/take back my earlier comment)
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    The only possible reason you should get a car at 15, it so you have a field car. However this is pointless if you don't have a field.
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    Bought my first car when I was 16 - a Triumph Spitfire 1500. I spent a year getting it roadworthy and learning how a car worked and went together. Then once I passed my test I put it on the road.
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    Also what's the point in buying a car that's already in good condition to work on?

    What exactly are you going to do to it? Buy something that's a heap of junk so you've actually got things to fix and learn from.
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    my point exactly

    not many tracks allow under 16 year olds to drive their own car

    and pointless getting a 700£ car to fix her up

    aim for a 200-300 spares / repair
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    I would suggest as others have said that you get a car thats in not as good condition to work on. If you buy something in condition similar to that Lupo then there's not much you will be able to "work on".
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    (Original post by ChrisHarris1)
    My contention was his age would be the limiting factor, not the car

    The T&C's when I look at "bring your own car" trackdays, is usually no under 16s as drivers

    I have been to a Track Day in my friends Porsche, and as I said, the only rules I saw was that of age (due to insurance I guess?)

    Can you show me a link to somewhere like Oulton Park that allows under 16s in their own vehicle? (don't mean that to sound confrontational, I genuinely would be interested/take back my earlier comment)
    You are right, it is 16+, just assumed it was younger due to the people at last track day @ Donnington I went too.
 
 
 
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