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    Hi,

    I've been reading some Physics books and I'm just wondering if anyone has any recommendations. I'm hoping to study theoretical physics at Durham.

    Thanks
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    maybe take a break and read some fiction novels that you like or is recommended by a someone instead of doing lots of preparation for uni. do some revision but have fun as well.
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    (Original post by Chelsea12345)
    maybe take a break and read some fiction novels that you like or is recommended by a someone instead of doing lots of preparation for uni. do some revision but have fun as well.
    Hi,

    Thanks, I have been reading some fiction, playing games, running, socialising it's just something to go with that
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    You mean like popular science? Or textbooks?

    And to Chelsea: depends on your idea of fun. I find non-fiction much more interesting than fiction and thus more fun to read.
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    (Original post by BestProfileName)
    You mean like popular science? Or textbooks?

    And to Chelsea: depends on your idea of fun. I find non-fiction much more interesting than fiction and thus more fun to read.
    I was hoping to find some middle ground. But if there are no such books, possibly a bit of both. I'd like to have a look at some relativity and a bit of quantum mechanics at higher level than the general public, but not so high I won't be able to follow it
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    (Original post by BestProfileName)
    You mean like popular science? Or textbooks?

    And to Chelsea: depends on your idea of fun. I find non-fiction much more interesting than fiction and thus more fun to read.
    i dont completley agree with that due to the fact that there millions of fiction books around and there ought to be at least one fiction novel you would find interesting.
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    (Original post by Chelsea12345)
    i dont completley agree with that due to the fact that there millions of fiction books around and there ought to be at least one fiction novel you would find interesting.
    Obviously. The point is that one can relax and have fun reading non-fiction and some even more than fiction. Although i basically have not read fiction for years...
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    That's kind of my point. If you can have fun reading fiction as you said you could then why not read fiction?
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    (Original post by Chelsea12345)
    That's kind of my point. If you can have fun reading fiction as you said you could then why not read fiction?
    "do some revision but have fun as well" implied that by reading non-fiction books pertaining, in this case, to physics cannot be fun.
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    Any recommendation's then?
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    If you want something useful but slightly easier to digest than A Brief History of Time then i can highly recommend Bad Science by Ben Goldacre. Some good lessons on good experimental practice in there, and it's really funny
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    (Original post by Rock_Set)
    Hi,

    I've been reading some Physics books and I'm just wondering if anyone has any recommendations. I'm hoping to study theoretical physics at Durham.

    Thanks
    Don't listen to those people who say to read fiction and popular science books. They will never be the most successful in their field. You should instead buy a general university text like this one:

    http://www.pearsonhighered.com/educa...805392128.page

    It consists of 2 volumes 1 and 2. Volume 2 includes an introduction to quantum mechanics (such as evaluating Schrodinger equations in a 1-D box and other potential fields) and relativity and will be a good foundation for more advanced studies.

    I would recommend reading both volumes cover to cover before commencing university, and definitely do alot of the practice problems. as you will want to achieve the best result possible and you will be on to even more advanced texts while your peers are struggling with the basics.

    Remember if you're not attempting the problems you may as well not even be reading the book.

    Goodluck.
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    (Original post by Rock_Set)
    I was hoping to find some middle ground. But if there are no such books, possibly a bit of both. I'd like to have a look at some relativity and a bit of quantum mechanics at higher level than the general public, but not so high I won't be able to follow it
    A great introduction to QM that's educational without feeling like "work" is Jim Al-Khalili's book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Quantum-Guid.../dp/1780223951

    Here's a more general book (it puts a large focus on the people who came up with the ideas - personally that helped me put things in context, but some people find it frustrating) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Physics-Idea...y+need+to+know
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    (Original post by jemlou9090)
    If you want something useful but slightly easier to digest than A Brief History of Time then i can highly recommend Bad Science by Ben Goldacre. Some good lessons on good experimental practice in there, and it's really funny
    I'll have a look, what's it really like, turning points in Physics?

    (Original post by Doctor_Einstein)
    Don't listen to those people who say to read fiction and popular science books. They will never be the most successful in their field. You should instead buy a general university text like this one:

    http://www.pearsonhighered.com/educa...805392128.page

    It consists of 2 volumes 1 and 2. Volume 2 includes an introduction to quantum mechanics (such as evaluating Schrodinger equations in a 1-D box and other potential fields) and relativity and will be a good foundation for more advanced studies.

    I would recommend reading both volumes cover to cover before commencing university, and definitely do alot of the practice problems. as you will want to achieve the best result possible and you will be on to even more advanced texts while your peers are struggling with the basics.

    Remember if you're not attempting the problems you may as well not even be reading the book.

    Goodluck.
    I think this is the sort thing I was looking for but wasn't really sure what book to get.

    (Original post by Tech)
    A great introduction to QM that's educational without feeling like "work" is Jim Al-Khalili's book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Quantum-Guid.../dp/1780223951

    Here's a more general book (it puts a large focus on the people who came up with the ideas - personally that helped me put things in context, but some people find it frustrating) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Physics-Idea...y+need+to+know
    Do any of these have any maths in, or are they just discussing the concepts?
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    (Original post by Rock_Set)
    I'll have a look, what's it really like, turning points in Physics?



    I think this is the sort thing I was looking for but wasn't really sure what book to get.



    Do any of these have any maths in, or are they just discussing the concepts?
    If you are particularly interested in quantum mechanics, see if you can get your head around this website, it contains a good introduction to the fundementals.

    http://vergil.chemistry.gatech.edu/n...rev/node1.html

    You should also look into mathematics for solving partial differential equations.
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    (Original post by Rock_Set)
    I'll have a look, what's it really like, turning points in Physics?



    I think this is the sort thing I was looking for but wasn't really sure what book to get.



    Do any of these have any maths in, or are they just discussing the concepts?
    If you get stuck with anything in your studies, this site is very useful for asking questions, even basic ones, about the particular aspect you are stuck on, mathematical or conceptual:

    http://physics.stackexchange.com/

    This book is probably good too:

    http://libgen.org/book/index.php?md5...2CFC7AE639EBAF
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    (Original post by Doctor_Einstein)
    If you get stuck with anything in your studies, this site is very useful for asking questions, even basic ones, about the particular aspect you are stuck on, mathematical or conceptual:

    http://physics.stackexchange.com/

    This book is probably good too:

    http://libgen.org/book/index.php?md5...2CFC7AE639EBAF
    Sweet, thank you. Do you have any tips for someone going to study Physics?
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    (Original post by Rock_Set)
    Sweet, thank you. Do you have any tips for someone going to study Physics?
    My tips would be to make sure you get your classical physics and mathematics down pat - especially electromagnetism and angular momentum in physics as well as fourier analysis, linear algera (matrix algebra), and solving partial differential equations in mathematics. It may seem boring but it will definitely help you down the road with more advanced studies if you're not having to look everything up again.

    Also in university, physics isn't explained as well as it is in school and so there will be times when you will not understand certain steps. But don't let this go, first think deeply about it until you can explain it yourself, second use the internet (yes wikipedia is helpful in physics) and other sources to find the answer, and third ask your professors to explain - while they may seem intimidating at first they are always glad to help.
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    (Original post by Doctor_Einstein)
    My tips would be to make sure you get your classical physics and mathematics down pat - especially electromagnetism and angular momentum in physics as well as fourier analysis, linear algera (matrix algebra), and solving partial differential equations in mathematics. It may seem boring but it will definitely help you down the road with more advanced studies if you're not having to look everything up again.

    Also in university, physics isn't explained as well as it is in school and so there will be times when you will not understand certain steps. But don't let this go, first think deeply about it until you can explain it yourself, second use the internet (yes wikipedia is helpful in physics) and other sources to find the answer, and third ask your professors to explain - while they may seem intimidating at first they are always glad to help.
    Thanks, is the first bit what's taught in first year? I was also wondering if it's true that your first year mark is counted in your final classification?

    I will do, did you have a preferred textbook?
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    Some good books I read were, 'In search of Schrodinger cat' and 'A strange theory of light and matter'.
 
 
 
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