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    Hi,
    I was chatting with my brother about my path into teaching and now he has a question about Schools Direct (Salaried).
    He would like to teach Biology at second level (he has a 2:1 degree in Palio-biology) but fingers crossed by this time next year he will have been awarded his doctorate!
    I told him that the salaried schools direct programmes are only for those with 3 years experience but he showed me this website where it says

    "School Direct Salaried is primarily aimed at career changers with three or more years’ work experience, but we will consider exceptional candidates who do not meet this criteria"

    Has anyone had any experience in this area...of course, he automatically assumes that with a doctorate he will be the "exceptional candidate" :-)......bless him!
    I'm not so quick to make assumptions...
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Hi,
    I was chatting with my brother about my path into teaching and now he has a question about Schools Direct (Salaried).
    He would like to teach Biology at second level (he has a 2:1 degree in Palio-biology) but fingers crossed by this time next year he will have been awarded his doctorate!
    I told him that the salaried schools direct programmes are only for those with 3 years experience but he showed me this website where it says

    "School Direct Salaried is primarily aimed at career changers with three or more years’ work experience, but we will consider exceptional candidates who do not meet this criteria"

    Has anyone had any experience in this area...of course, he automatically assumes that with a doctorate he will be the "exceptional candidate" :-)......bless him!
    I'm not so quick to make assumptions...
    I think the PhD actually counts as work experience itself, which would be at least 3 years anyway. I know for me at least they counted my Masters years as a whole year of work experience. If he's unsure, he can contact the training providers themselves and ask if they will accept his experience before he applies.
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    (Original post by CM19)
    I think the PhD actually counts as work experience itself, which would be at least 3 years anyway. I know for me at least they counted my Masters years as a whole year of work experience. If he's unsure, he can contact the training providers themselves and ask if they will accept his experience before he applies.
    That would be great for him!
    How have you got on with the programme? I'm afraid I've heard a few negative stories about being paid very little and even a few people referring to SDS as a "Scam"..
    I guess you've got to hit the ground running as its not a PGCE course...
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    That would be great for him!
    How have you got on with the programme? I'm afraid I've heard a few negative stories about being paid very little and even a few people referring to SDS as a "Scam"..
    I guess you've got to hit the ground running as its not a PGCE course...
    Yeah it would, he should also get some school experience to make his application stronger.

    Unfortunately, I haven't got on to any of my programmes, I think my lack of experience compared to other candidates went against me this year - I will try again this year.

    It's definitely not a scam, people do train on the course and they do get offered jobs afterwards. It's just the effectiveness of the course which has been debated, because teachers are thrown into the deep end with minimal training, whereas on the PGCE you get proper pedagogical training before you have to teach in the classroom.
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    (Original post by CM19)
    Yeah it would, he should also get some school experience to make his application stronger.

    Unfortunately, I haven't got on to any of my programmes, I think my lack of experience compared to other candidates went against me this year - I will try again this year.

    It's definitely not a scam, people do train on the course and they do get offered jobs afterwards. It's just the effectiveness of the course which has been debated, because teachers are thrown into the deep end with minimal training, whereas on the PGCE you get proper pedagogical training before you have to teach in the classroom.
    Sorry to hear that it hasent worked out for you this year...it could be a positive thing in the end...like you said, it gives you more time to gain experience :-) certainly I wonder if its fair to throw someone into the deep end? but i guess many who apply are teaching assistants or have experience in teaching at some level so its not likely candidates are totally green to teaching. Did you go with an agency or direct to the schools?
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    They like to pretend that the salaried Schools Direct places are for career movers but in reality the successful candidates are usually teaching assistants or people who have had VERY close links to a participating school. The amount of school experience needed to gain a place on a School Direct means it is impossible for a person already in full time work to do. I originally thought i would go down this route but on closer inspection it was extremely difficult. I am now doing a PGCE at university. This will be tough in terms of income but I think you learn the the job in a much more thorough way with way more support. Good luck!
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    yep, just what I've heard too!! Its a shame people are not being given a fair shot at it...
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    The non-salaried version is much easier to get on. I had next to no experience when I applied and I completed my training this year. Bursaries etc meant my income was around 16k over the year, tax free, and only around 3k of that is to be repaid through student loans.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    The non-salaried version is much easier to get on. I had next to no experience when I applied and I completed my training this year. Bursaries etc meant my income was around 16k over the year, tax free, and only around 3k of that is to be repaid through student loans.
    Wow, thats actually not too bad. Maybe I should recommend this to him. Would you mind if he sent you a private message if he has any questions?
    Sounds like you've had lots of experience :-)
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    He'd be better off posting an open question, as I'm not the only person on here who did school direct this year. Some unsalaried, some salaried.

    There's also a post for those who've been applying this year which would make interesting reading.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    He'd be better off posting an open question, as I'm not the only person on here who did school direct this year. Some unsalaried, some salaried.

    There's also a post for those who've been applying this year which would make interesting reading.
    Thanks, will check that out :-)
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Sorry to hear that it hasent worked out for you this year...it could be a positive thing in the end...like you said, it gives you more time to gain experience :-) certainly I wonder if its fair to throw someone into the deep end? but i guess many who apply are teaching assistants or have experience in teaching at some level so its not likely candidates are totally green to teaching. Did you go with an agency or direct to the schools?
    Yeah well there were many applicants who had a lot of whole class teaching experience and teaching assistants do apply for these positions. You can only apply for schools direct through the UCAS portal, it should reopen sometime around November now.

    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    The non-salaried version is much easier to get on. I had next to no experience when I applied and I completed my training this year. Bursaries etc meant my income was around 16k over the year, tax free, and only around 3k of that is to be repaid through student loans.
    If you don't mind me asking, as it seems like I will apply to both non salaried and salaried this year, which bursaries were these? I've looked and looked and it seems like I am only eligible for 4k in bursaries, which means that my total for the year will be in the minus, considering I will need to pay 5k for the tuition fees.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    The non-salaried version is much easier to get on. I had next to no experience when I applied and I completed my training this year. Bursaries etc meant my income was around 16k over the year, tax free, and only around 3k of that is to be repaid through student loans.
    Hi,
    I just spoke to a Uni lecturer who advised to stick with the PGCE. We had a look at the fees £9000 and with the bursary £4000, he will still have to come up with £5000 fees and about £10,000 living expenses for the year. Just wondering what you meant by your income around £16,000. Maybe you mean expenses? and also whats this I hear about tax free? :-)
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    (Original post by Cloclo15)
    They like to pretend that the salaried Schools Direct places are for career movers but in reality the successful candidates are usually teaching assistants or people who have had VERY close links to a participating school. The amount of school experience needed to gain a place on a School Direct means it is impossible for a person already in full time work to do. I originally thought i would go down this route but on closer inspection it was extremely difficult. I am now doing a PGCE at university. This will be tough in terms of income but I think you learn the the job in a much more thorough way with way more support. Good luck!
    This. I was working as TA and the 3 salaried places my school got went to current TA's, including myself.


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    (Original post by CM19)
    If you don't mind me asking, as it seems like I will apply to both non salaried and salaried this year, which bursaries were these? I've looked and looked and it seems like I am only eligible for 4k in bursaries, which means that my total for the year will be in the minus, considering I will need to pay 5k for the tuition fees.
    No problem. Here's how it broke down for me.

    FYI I am single and over 25, and had no household income from work while training.

    So I got:
    4k government training bursary (primary with a 2:1)
    4k university bursary due to low household income
    Around 3.5k maintenance grant due to low household income (non-repayable)
    Around 3.5k maintenance loan (repayable once earning over 22k)
    And a loan for the full amount of the fees (repayable once earning over 22k).

    I can't remember the exact loan and grant amounts, but that's roughly correct.
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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Hi,
    I just spoke to a Uni lecturer who advised to stick with the PGCE. We had a look at the fees £9000 and with the bursary £4000, he will still have to come up with £5000 fees and about £10,000 living expenses for the year. Just wondering what you meant by your income around £16,000. Maybe you mean expenses? and also whats this I hear about tax free? :-)
    No, I mean income. See reply to other poster for the breakdown. And by tax free, I mean you don't pay tax on student loans, bursaries*etc. On the salaried school direct scheme your pay will be subject to the usual tax and NI payments.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    No problem. Here's how it broke down for me.

    FYI I am single and over 25, and had no household income from work while training.

    So I got:
    4k government training bursary (primary with a 2:1)
    4k university bursary due to low household income
    Around 3.5k maintenance grant due to low household income (non-repayable)
    Around 3.5k maintenance loan (repayable once earning over 22k)
    And a loan for the full amount of the fees (repayable once earning over 22k).

    I can't remember the exact loan and grant amounts, but that's roughly correct.
    That's very helpful, thanks.

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    (Original post by classiclearner)
    yep, just what I've heard too!! Its a shame people are not being given a fair shot at it...
    That's not always the case. I was offered a SDS position last December having spent about 15 years in a different industry. I did have some experience in schools, but only that which I'd organised to do on my holidays from my full-time job. Not all SDS candidates have worked as TAs.
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    (Original post by CM19)
    Yeah well there were many applicants who had a lot of whole class teaching experience and teaching assistants do apply for these positions. You can only apply for schools direct through the UCAS portal, it should reopen sometime around November now.

    If you don't mind me asking, as it seems like I will apply to both non salaried and salaried this year, which bursaries were these? I've looked and looked and it seems like I am only eligible for 4k in bursaries, which means that my total for the year will be in the minus, considering I will need to pay 5k for the tuition fees.

    (Original post by classiclearner)
    Hi,
    I just spoke to a Uni lecturer who advised to stick with the PGCE. We had a look at the fees £9000 and with the bursary £4000, he will still have to come up with £5000 fees and about £10,000 living expenses for the year. Just wondering what you meant by your income around £16,000. Maybe you mean expenses? and also whats this I hear about tax free? :-)
    You are eligible for a tuition fee and maintenance student loan if you do the non-salaried route of Schools Direct.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    You are eligible for a tuition fee and maintenance student loan if you do the non-salaried route of Schools Direct.
    Thanks for that. As it turns out, I've been told today that because he will have a PHd when he applies next year, he will actually be bumped up to 9000 bursary. Which would be fantastic!! Fingers crossed :-)
 
 
 
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