Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I want to buff up my personal statement, as well as develop a better understanding of what economics might be like at uni.
    Has anyone got any recommendations for what I could read/watch?
    (PS I already study economics at alevel so im not a complete novice.)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I would be interested in anything to watch as well because reading gets so dull. Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics are both quite interesting to read and they are quite relevant but they are a bit of an odd view. The undercover economist is a more relevant book but it can get dull in places (as you expect with any uni reading list book) but it is ok (I am only half way through so far.)
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neonfun)
    I want to buff up my personal statement, as well as develop a better understanding of what economics might be like at uni.
    Has anyone got any recommendations for what I could read/watch?
    (PS I already study economics at alevel so im not a complete novice.)
    (Original post by Alex Doran)
    I would be interested in anything to watch as well because reading gets so dull. Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics are both quite interesting to read and they are quite relevant but they are a bit of an odd view. The undercover economist is a more relevant book but it can get dull in places (as you expect with any uni reading list book) but it is ok (I am only half way through so far.)
    These 'mainstream' books tend not to be so representative of degree-level economics, and if you really want a flavour of it then you'd probably have to read a textbook. I wouldn't really recommend that, but I can recommend you to be enthusiastic about maths (and its applications), and also about current affairs involving economics. If you enjoy these two, then you're likely to enjoy degree-level economics. It might be a good idea to take a look at the module selection from a uni you're interested in and see if that interests you.

    If you want something to do meanwhile then have a look at LSE's youtube page and they upload speeches given by influential people. Also, it's very very good to read The Economist, as it assumes knowledge. So you might be reading it and see a technical term you've never come across before, like liquidity trap. They won't explain it, so you have to research it yourself. This builds up your vocabulary and all-round knowledge very well. It's not too expensive, I think they have offers for students.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alex Doran)
    I would be interested in anything to watch as well because reading gets so dull. Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics are both quite interesting to read and they are quite relevant but they are a bit of an odd view. The undercover economist is a more relevant book but it can get dull in places (as you expect with any uni reading list book) but it is ok (I am only half way through so far.)
    Wow! You are in for a surprise if you think the Undercover Economist is "a bit dull" - that is pop economics. No university would place any weighting on that book. It's a fun read, but has no actual economic material.

    If you are serious, you should read books by Krugman, Stiglitz etc - maybe on game theory or behavioural economics.
    Watching wise I'm not sure, but I know that there are some good podcasts by the guys who wrote Freakonomics.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mike_123)
    These 'mainstream' books tend not to be so representative of degree-level economics, and if you really want a flavour of it then you'd probably have to read a textbook. I wouldn't really recommend that, but I can recommend you to be enthusiastic about maths (and its applications), and also about current affairs involving economics. If you enjoy these two, then you're likely to enjoy degree-level economics. It might be a good idea to take a look at the module selection from a uni you're interested in and see if that interests you.

    If you want something to do meanwhile then have a look at LSE's youtube page and they upload speeches given by influential people. Also, it's very very good to read The Economist, as it assumes knowledge. So you might be reading it and see a technical term you've never come across before, like liquidity trap. They won't explain it, so you have to research it yourself. This builds up your vocabulary and all-round knowledge very well. It's not too expensive, I think they have offers for students.
    I think anyone who says they read the Economist is instantly discredited because SO many people will say it and admissions tutors will be getting annoyed with everyone saying it (despite many not having read it.) I think they are likely to be more impressed with something that not everyone says and that it is likely you have actually done (although I am aware that Freakonomics and such are not in this category but I get really bored reading anything proper.)
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Why the hell do you want do economics at uni if you find anything "proper" boring?? All books and especially uni books will be mUch more complicate and have much more jargon in. Maybe you ought to rethink things...
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alex Doran)
    I think anyone who says they read the Economist is instantly discredited because SO many people will say it and admissions tutors will be getting annoyed with everyone saying it (despite many not having read it.) I think they are likely to be more impressed with something that not everyone says and that it is likely you have actually done (although I am aware that Freakonomics and such are not in this category but I get really bored reading anything proper.)
    That's because it's the best magazine out there. You're expected to read it if you're a serious applicant. This should just be one portion of your outside reading. You're right, you don't have to mention it and may want to avoid it if you have better things to say in your PS, but you definitely should give it a read.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by groovyd97)
    Why the hell do you want do economics at uni if you find anything "proper" boring?? All books and especially uni books will be mUch more complicate and have much more jargon in. Maybe you ought to rethink things...
    I want to do a combined degree of Geog and Econ and I find parts of both subjects a bit dull. I still like most parts of each subject and find them very interesting. I like the lessons in both subjects and find them interesting and there is no subjects I would prefer to do.
    I am not going to university because I find the subjects interesting, I am going because I don't dislike them and because the jobs I want to be getting probably require you to have gone to a good university and done quite well. I am potentially looking at A*'s in both (based on mocks) so it shows that I don't have to find them interesting to do well in them. I should be able to get into a decent uni and continue to do as well as I currently am and then I have everything I want, even if the next 3 years are a little bit dull at times.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Alex Doran)
    I want to do a combined degree of Geog and Econ and I find parts of both subjects a bit dull. I still like most parts of each subject and find them very interesting. I like the lessons in both subjects and find them interesting and there is no subjects I would prefer to do.
    I am not going to university because I find the subjects interesting, I am going because I don't dislike them and because the jobs I want to be getting probably require you to have gone to a good university and done quite well. I am potentially looking at A*'s in both (based on mocks) so it shows that I don't have to find them interesting to do well in them. I should be able to get into a decent uni and continue to do as well as I currently am and then I have everything I want, even if the next 3 years are a little bit dull at times.
    Ok that's fair enough then. Even if you do find them boring, if you want to get into a good uni, I would definitely suggest reading some harder, more well reputed books. Like the ones I suggested.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.