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    Hey all,

    I was reading an article that stated half of those who graduate in Medicine then go off to become general practitioners. Despite the fact that they may enjoy it more than other sectors in the health care system, why else do you think this is the current case? One can argue there are much more job satisfying careers within Medicine, so why GP?
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    work 4 days a week
    no on calls
    no nights
    3 years to fully qualify
    better paid
    private opportunities
    more likely to get a location you want
    no extra curricular requirements to get into the training program
    less competitive
    autonomy
    family friendly

    there are dozens
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    Not sure about the figure, but having many medic friends means I know why this may be. Medicine drains the life out of people, some people can handle it and knew it was comming. FY1 and FY2 are INCREDIBLY stressful and some people realise that they may not be able to handle it. Being a GP is one of the shorter specialities with a high salary and probably the most sociable lifestyle. The salary and working hours just do not add up until you're far into medicine.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    work 4 days a week
    no on calls
    no nights
    3 years to fully qualify
    better paid
    private opportunities
    more likely to get a location you want
    no extra curricular requirements to get into the training program
    less competitive
    autonomy
    family friendly

    there are dozens

    think its 5 years to qualify now. Pretty much why I've changed my whole plan and decided to go for GP.
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    Isn't it obvious, the health system needs more GPs than anything else? They NHS doesn't make jobs based in what people enjoy.
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    (Original post by MedMed12)
    think its 5 years to qualify now. Pretty much why I've changed my whole plan and decided to go for GP.
    What were you thinking to do initially?
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    Hey all,

    I was reading an article that stated half of those who graduate in Medicine then go off to become general practitioners.
    It's closer to 60% actually iirc.

    Despite the fact that they may enjoy it more than other sectors in the health care system, why else do you think this is the current case? One can argue there are much more job satisfying careers within the Medicine, so why GP?
    Many common conditions are dealt with at a primary care level i.e. by GPs, not hospital doctors. The vast majority of patients with eczema don't need the attention of a dermatologist, they just need their GP to prescribe them some hydrocortisone. Similarly, most patients with mild/moderate depression don't need to be referred to a psychiatrist, they need to be referred to CBT or be prescribed an anti-depressant by their GP. And so on, and so forth. Much of the health demands of the population are met by GPs (who of course also act as gatekeepers to hospital services), so that's the reason from a public health perspective.

    From the doctor-in-training's perspective, GP specialty training is 3 years (so quite short compared to medical/surgical training), the hours are more family friendly, and the salary is pretty good...so these factors will help attract junior doctors to the specialty.

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    What were you thinking to do initially?
    Dermatology,Geriatrics or even endocrinology
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    (Original post by MedMed12)
    think its 5 years to qualify now. Pretty much why I've changed my whole plan and decided to go for GP.
    No still 3

    Source: i am CT1 anaesthetics who almost applied for GP
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    (Original post by Hippokrates)
    Isn't it obvious, the health system needs more GPs than anything else? They NHS doesn't make jobs based in what people enjoy.
    True, although I do not recall saying the NHS make jobs depending on the enjoyment of others? I was simply saying someone may chose to become a GP as oppose to something like dermatologist as they are more intrigued with it. I think that's perfectly logical.
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    Pretty sure its 5 years including FY1 and FY2?
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    (Original post by andbegin)
    Pretty sure its 5 years including FY1 and FY2?
    FY1 and FY2 aren't specialty training years though - they're what all newly qualified doctors have to do. GP VTS is still 3 years long.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    FY1 and FY2 aren't specialty training years though - they're what all newly qualified doctors have to do. GP VTS is still 3 years long.
    Well, Im pretty sure FY1 and FY2 are grueling enough to call them training years haha.
    An Iranian medic is see... I went down the other path
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    True, although I do not recall saying the NHS make jobs depending on the enjoyment of others? I was simply saying someone may chose to become a GP as oppose to something like dermatologist as they are more intrigued with it. I think that's perfectly logical.
    What I'm trying to say is that people may become GPs when they can't get the post they want.
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    GP training is '5 years' in one sense i.e. foundation programme + 3 years GP training , however the RCGP want to lengthen GP training to 4 and eventually 5 years over time

    http://www.rcgp.org.uk/policy/rcgp-p...-practice.aspx

    if you consider that 12 months primary care, 6 months A+E / urgent care half fills the 3 years of GPST,

    you've then got 18 months for paeds, psych, O+G , dermatology, Diabetes and endocrinology, acute medicine , gastro etc etc ...
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    (Original post by andbegin)
    Well, Im pretty sure FY1 and FY2 are grueling enough to call them training years haha.
    I'm sure too, but they're still not specialty training years

    An Iranian medic is see... I went down the other path
    What's that then, engineering or dentistry?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I'm sure too, but they're still not specialty training years



    What's that then, engineering or dentistry?
    Engineering? please.... lol
    Dentistry
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    GP training is '5 years' in one sense i.e. foundation programme + 3 years GP training , however the RCGP want to lengthen GP training to 4 and eventually 5 years over time

    http://www.rcgp.org.uk/policy/rcgp-p...-practice.aspx

    if you consider that 12 months primary care, 6 months A+E / urgent care half fills the 3 years of GPST,

    you've then got 18 months for paeds, psych, O+G , dermatology, Diabetes and endocrinology, acute medicine , gastro etc etc ...
    They are trying to lengthen everything it seems. Graduate medical and dental schools are turning into 5 year, even for medic/dental graduates making max fax surgery even more unappealing, lengthening foundation dentistry training to 2 years rather than 1. Seems a little strange when we're constantly told the NHS don't have enough funds.
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    (Original post by andbegin)
    They are trying to lengthen everything it seems. Graduate medical and dental schools are turning into 5 year, even for medic/dental graduates making max fax surgery even more unappealing, lengthening foundation dentistry training to 2 years rather than 1. Seems a little strange when we're constantly told the NHS don't have enough funds.
    When do you think they will change it by? In the next 5 years you think?
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    When do you think the change it by? In the next 5 years you think?
    Honestly I don't know what their priorities are, there are so many things that need changing - more urgently than training IMHO.
    They've been saying they're going to change dentistry from 1 to 2 years after university for a while but nothing has changed. But, they have closed a few of the graduate schools so it seems that is more pressing (I've heard its from pressure from the EU).
 
 
 
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