What happens if you DON'T continue education after 16? Watch

ChickenMadness
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#21
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#21
Well you go on the dole and then get a job (or not).
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Moosferatu
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#22
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#22
You get free funding from the council to get qualifications for your laziness. If you get a degree however you can kiss any genuine skills training goodbye.
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Gunni098
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#23
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#23
I don't want to be blunt but you might as well immigrate to a country that has no laws on further education because you have to be in education until your 18. Enjoy the fines from the police and let your mum know she will attend court half a dozen times including massive fine bills and jail sentences.
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yellowcopter
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Gunni098)
I don't want to be blunt but you might as well immigrate to a country that has no laws on further education because you have to be in education until your 18. Enjoy the fines from the police and let your mum know she will attend court half a dozen times including massive fine bills and jail sentences.
Read the OP. I'm talking about a friend, not me. But yeah what she's doing is so stupid.
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Champagning
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#25
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#25
(Original post by iRaii)
Binman Wasteman.
Fixed
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Gunni098
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#26
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#26
(Original post by yellowcopter)
Read the OP. I'm talking about a friend, not me. But yeah what she's doing is so stupid.
Oh okay well sucks to be her xD
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yellowcopter
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Champagning)
Fixed
LOL

She is a wasteman so.
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crayolaguy
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#28
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#28
you smoke weed erryday and live life without a job and claiming you're looking for one.
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Jade.hes
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#29
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#29
This is my question too as I started college in September this year, I am 16 and I'm doing childhood studies level 2. I picked this course considering I thought I would enjoy it and I would be good but I don't and I'm not! I haven't managed to complete my assignments which are all too much for me and it's making me feel like ****. I would much rather get a full time job (I have just started a new job just to put that out there) and start my life already because looking after children isn't what I want to do with my life I just want a good job and a family!! I don't know what to do anymore it's just making me upset because I have to get up and waste my life in college not even learning as I can't even concentrate for over 15-20mins😫😫
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Thesadelf
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#30
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#30
Uh you DO get in trouble I left school on June 2017 and had numerous emails from my council and other people wondering why I’m not in ANY college or work. Basically my records are empty. I’m not doing absolutely nothing for the past 8 months and I’m ignoring the emails, letters and phone calls. Thats what depression does it sucks the life out of you.
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iodo345
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#31
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Life doesn't come to an end just because you leave education at 16 and do A level and go to university.

Some people are more successful who leave school at 16 than those with degrees.
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AngelaVickers
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#32
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(Original post by nohomo)
Oh well perhaps she could find a guy to live off then. Is she pretty?
Reading this thread has made me realise this CANNOT happen to me! I was stupidly careless when it came to my GCSE'S and failed all but one, not because I wasn't intelligent but because I hated school! Anyway, long story short, I left school a couple of years ago but it's too late to join sixth form now. I want to study both GCSE'S AND A-LEVELS online so that I can finally achieve my predicted A*'s and go off to university. Would anyone recommend this and does anybody have any advice? I just really don't want to be stuck in a dead end job! Or worse, live off someone else!
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ByronicHero
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#33
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#33
(Original post by AngelaVickers)
Reading this thread has made me realise this CANNOT happen to me! I was stupidly careless when it came to my GCSE'S and failed all but one, not because I wasn't intelligent but because I hated school! Anyway, long story short, I left school a couple of years ago but it's too late to join sixth form now. I want to study both GCSE'S AND A-LEVELS online so that I can finally achieve my predicted A*'s and go off to university. Would anyone recommend this and does anybody have any advice? I just really don't want to be stuck in a dead end job! Or worse, live off someone else!
You can be successful without going to university, but in answer to your question you probably have four main options.

1) Register as an external candidate at a local exam centre (usually a college or secondary school), teach yourself the material and take the exams for whichever A levels and GCSEs you wish to take. This is the cheapest option. but it can be awkward when you need to do coursework and you need to be very confident in your abilities. This is the option I would personally choose, but not the option I would recommend.

2) Register with one of the various distance learning companies for whichever qualifications you wish to take. This will cost significantly more than option one, but it is logistically easier to organise and you would also typically benefit from the support of tutors who are often current or ex teachers.

3) See if you can take an Access to HE course. This is a very popular route for people like you with few qualifications. I do not know a great deal about the design of the course, but do know that most universities are happy to consider applications from people with these.

4) Avoid all of that and do a degree with a distance learning provider of which the best by some margin is the Open University.

I would definitely recommend that you think carefully about your circumstances and choose the route that is best for you. Your financial situation, tolerance for self-directed study and overall willingness to spend several years taking prerequisite courses are all important things to consider. If you have any questions, feel free to quote me.
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AngelaVickers
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#34
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#34
(Original post by ByronicHero)
You can be successful without going to university, but in answer to your question you probably have four main options.

1) Register as an external candidate at a local exam centre (usually a college or secondary school), teach yourself the material and take the exams for whichever A levels and GCSEs you wish to take. This is the cheapest option. but it can be awkward when you need to do coursework and you need to be very confident in your abilities. This is the option I would personally choose, but not the option I would recommend.

2) Register with one of the various distance learning companies for whichever qualifications you wish to take. This will cost significantly more than option one, but it is logistically easier to organise and you would also typically benefit from the support of tutors who are often current or ex teachers.

3) See if you can take an Access to HE course. This is a very popular route for people like you with few qualifications. I do not know a great deal about the design of the course, but do know that most universities are happy to consider applications from people with these.

4) Avoid all of that and do a degree with a distance learning provider of which the best by some margin is the Open University.

I would definitely recommend that you think carefully about your circumstances and choose the route that is best for you. Your financial situation, tolerance for self-directed study and overall willingness to spend several years taking prerequisite courses are all important things to consider. If you have any questions, feel free to quote me.
Hi,
Thank you so much for replying! I'd never thought about self-teaching. I'd much rather do that! And I understand that many people have been successful without much education however it would be my dream to study at Norland College. I was wondering if you know anymore information about self-teaching? I think I could definitely do that as I'm highly self motivated. But I'm just wondering how it works exactly?
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ByronicHero
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#35
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(Original post by AngelaVickers)
Hi,
Thank you so much for replying! I'd never thought about self-teaching. I'd much rather do that! And I understand that many people have been successful without much education however it would be my dream to study at Norland College. I was wondering if you know anymore information about self-teaching? I think I could definitely do that as I'm highly self motivated. But I'm just wondering how it works exactly?
Norland College has fairly modest academic requirements, so that works in your favour. You should call them and ask how stringently they enforce the 5 GCSE pass requirement and whether, given your circumstances, English and maths passes with a handful of A levels would suffice. This should be your first call. If this is your dream you need a full and proper understanding of what you need to do.

Essentially, you need to find out where your closest exam centre is. Exam boards have their own list of registered centres (here is the Edexcel tool). When you have identified them, give them a call and ask them if they have any restrictions on what you can study or, if you already know what you want to do, ask directly whether they would facilities you sitting the exams for those particular courses. They will also tell you the fees which are usually not particularly high. Then, you buy the relevant textbooks or other materials, print off the syllabus and work your way through it. This is much easier for some subjects than others. Maths is very easy to self-teach in general, but something with a practical component will be very difficult.
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AngelaVickers
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#36
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#36
(Original post by ByronicHero)
Norland College has fairly modest academic requirements, so that works in your favour. You should call them and ask how stringently they enforce the 5 GCSE pass requirement and whether, given your circumstances, English and maths passes with a handful of A levels would suffice. This should be your first call. If this is your dream you need a full and proper understanding of what you need to do.

Essentially, you need to find out where your closest exam centre is. Exam boards have their own list of registered centres (here is the Edexcel tool). When you have identified them, give them a call and ask them if they have any restrictions on what you can study or, if you already know what you want to do, ask directly whether they would facilities you sitting the exams for those particular courses. They will also tell you the fees which are usually not particularly high. Then, you buy the relevant textbooks or other materials, print off the syllabus and work your way through it. This is much easier for some subjects than others. Maths is very easy to self-teach in general, but something with a practical component will be very difficult.
Oh that makes perfect sense now. Thank you so much. There's a prep school in my area that allows external candidates to study IGCSES and A-LEVELS at any subject except those with practical components which is good for me as I was thinking English literature, economics and psychology would be quite relevant subject choices for my A-Levels as well as mathematics, combined science (because I only achieved a D first time around) and psychology for my GCSES. I just want to do everything right as this is my last chance to do this as a teenager!
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AngelaVickers
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#37
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#37
(Original post by ByronicHero)
Norland College has fairly modest academic requirements, so that works in your favour. You should call them and ask how stringently they enforce the 5 GCSE pass requirement and whether, given your circumstances, English and maths passes with a handful of A levels would suffice. This should be your first call. If this is your dream you need a full and proper understanding of what you need to do.

Essentially, you need to find out where your closest exam centre is. Exam boards have their own list of registered centres (here is the Edexcel tool). When you have identified them, give them a call and ask them if they have any restrictions on what you can study or, if you already know what you want to do, ask directly whether they would facilities you sitting the exams for those particular courses. They will also tell you the fees which are usually not particularly high. Then, you buy the relevant textbooks or other materials, print off the syllabus and work your way through it. This is much easier for some subjects than others. Maths is very easy to self-teach in general, but something with a practical component will be very difficult.
...all I'd like to know now is if this does all work out and I am eligible to apply for Norland, what do I do when it comes to things such as my personal statement, references, UCAS points etc that type of thing?
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VidiaA
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#38
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#38
You need some qualifications for even that these days!
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Ahlawy2001
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#39
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#39
Her parents would stop receiving Child Benefit. That's it. And if she couldn't get a job, She wouldn't be eligible to receive benefits until she finds one.
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ByronicHero
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#40
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(Original post by AngelaVickers)
Oh that makes perfect sense now. Thank you so much. There's a prep school in my area that allows external candidates to study IGCSES and A-LEVELS at any subject except those with practical components which is good for me as I was thinking English literature, economics and psychology would be quite relevant subject choices for my A-Levels as well as mathematics, combined science (because I only achieved a D first time around) and psychology for my GCSES. I just want to do everything right as this is my last chance to do this as a teenager!
(Original post by AngelaVickers)
...all I'd like to know now is if this does all work out and I am eligible to apply for Norland, what do I do when it comes to things such as my personal statement, references, UCAS points etc that type of thing?
Assuming you have a pass in English at GCSE, that all sounds fine. You can learn the GCSE material in a few days if you are motivated and have a good memory, and those A levels should be fine.

Your personal statement would be written with the same stipulations as anyone else's would. When the time comes there is a section on TSR where people can review a draft of your PS. I wouldn't worry about this too much yet unless a prerequisite for your course is practical voluntary or paid experience, in which case it is usually prudent to reflect on this experience in your PS and, as such, you need to consider how you might get that experience.

Your reference would ideally be somebody from your previous school but, given your poor academic record, it might prove more appropriate for you to use a manager at work. This is especially true if you work in an industry which is related to your proposed study.

UCAS points are decided by your attainment on a given course and are not a product of the method you use to attain them. If you get BBB, it makes no difference to your points total whether you achieved them as a full-time student or as a self-taught one. You may find that universities view your attainment differently on this basis, especially if you are working full-time as well as studying at a full-time pace, but that isn't something anyone can confirm for you.
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