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    Can we use a comma before "it" in any circumstance? Or will that be a comma splice?.

    For example: I went to to the shop, it was extremely hot.

    or

    Although Barry has an urge to criticise me continuously, it was up to me to be a better person and walk away.

    How about using comma before then?

    Due to the racial differences this would cause disagreements within the communities, then this will influence the whole community to cause disruption.
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    Your second example is correct, I believe. But your other sentences should use 'which', not 'it'.
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Can we use a comma before "it" in any circumstance? Or will that be a comma splice?.

    For example: I went to to the shop, it was extremely hot.

    or

    Although Barry has an urge to criticise me continuously, it was up to me to be a better person and walk away.

    How about using comma before then?

    Due to the racial differences this would cause disagreements within the communities, then this will influence the whole community to cause disruption.
    Hi again

    I wouldn't say that you could use a comma before 'it' in any circumstance.

    1) The first example would be a comma splice as you are joining two independent clauses. The key is to think 'can the part before the comma and the part after the comma stand alone as two separate sentences?'. If so, adding a comma there would be incorrect.

    You can fix this comma splice:
    - with a semi-colon, dash or colon.
    - by writing the two clauses separately (I went to the shop. It was extremely hot.)
    - by making one clause dependent on the other (As it was extremely hot, I went to the shop.)
    - by adding in a coordinating conjunction (I went to the shop, but it was extremely hot)

    2) The second example you have provided is correct. The first clause is a dependent clause ('Although Barry has an urge to criticise me continuously') and cannot stand alone as a sentence. It also provides more explanation to the independent clause - the sentence that can stand alone - which is the second part of the sentence ('it was up to me to be a better person and walk away'.)

    3) The last example is a bit disjointed. I would be more inclined to word it like this: Due to the racial differences, this would cause disagreements within the communities, which will influence the whole community to cause disruption.

    Again, you should think which parts are independent clauses and which parts are dependent clauses, and place your commas accordingly.I have also put a comma here 'Due to the racial differences, this...' so that the sentence is not misleading - it could have been read 'Due to the racial differences this would cause, disagreements...'.

    I have to say, these rules aren't concrete and you can choose whether you feel the comma is really necessary or not - they are mainly there to guide you.

    Hope this was okay!
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    Thank you guys I final know how to use a bloody comma!!
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    Finally*
 
 
 
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