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Lower back problem when jogging Watch

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    -Walking is fine for my lower back
    -Running (sprinting) *seems* fine for my lower back (or at least I don't remember ever having back issues while running)

    -jogging (speed in between walking and sprinting), seems to cause lower back aches within 5 minutes

    (I also remember getting such pain when doing household work e.g when I'm on the floor and vacuuming)

    My GP confirmed I have a slight anterior pelvic tilt and recommended physio but it will take 6 weeks to get an appointment.

    Can I get any advice to help with this problem?


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    (Original post by 00100101)
    -Walking is fine for my lower back
    -Running (sprinting) *seems* fine for my lower back (or at least I don't remember ever having back issues while running)

    -jogging (speed in between walking and sprinting), seems to cause lower back aches within 5 minutes

    (I also remember getting such pain when doing household work e.g when I'm on the floor and vacuuming)

    My GP confirmed I have a slight anterior pelvic tilt and recommended physio but it will take 6 weeks to get an appointment.

    Can I get any advice to help with this problem?


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    Perhaps your posture is wrong, both during the day and jogging. Many people lean forward when they jog, which is of course very bad for the lower back, make,a conscious effort to ensure your posture is nice and straight. Same as driving, sitting etc......you will slouch probably without even noticing it. When you make a conscious effort to stop it, you will maybe see an improvement.

    However, don't take my word over your GP lol
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    (Original post by Gillybop)
    Perhaps your posture is wrong, both during the day and jogging. Many people lean forward when they jog, which is of course very bad for the lower back, make,a conscious effort to ensure your posture is nice and straight. Same as driving, sitting etc......you will slouch probably without even noticing it. When you make a conscious effort to stop it, you will maybe see an improvement.

    However, don't take my word over your GP lol
    My GP also suggested trying to correct my posture, though I was hoping for solutions that are a little more short term (I.e enough to get me through a work out session for example)


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    This sounds exactly like you have tight hip abductors and hip flexors, which is causing pelvic tilt and lower back pain. This is especially a problem if you sit for long periods of the day and will become apparent when doing exercise, especially running.

    You need to stretch you hip abductors and flexors and strengthen them.


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    (Original post by Last Day Lepers)
    This sounds exactly like you have tight hip abductors and hip flexors, which is causing pelvic tilt and lower back pain. This is especially a problem if you sit for long periods of the day and will become apparent when doing exercise, especially running.

    You need to stretch you hip abductors and flexors and strengthen them.


    I thought about this too (I.e strengthen my core, and stretch the lower back), but I wasn't certain if I was just being a hypochondriac.

    I'll try my best to remember to stand with better posture when I'm up, I'll try and stretch/strengthen my back and core during workouts, but a lot of the time I will still be sitting down (can't stand up forever). Seems a bit counterproductive unless for example I replace sitting down with laying down flat on your stomach when you work/rest is better? That should also help stretch the adductors and flexors shouldn't it?


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    (Original post by 00100101)
    I thought about this too (I.e strengthen my core, and stretch the lower back), but I wasn't certain if I was just being a hypochondriac.

    I'll try my best to remember to stand with better posture when I'm up, I'll try and stretch/strengthen my back and core during workouts, but a lot of the time I will still be sitting down (can't stand up forever). Seems a bit counterproductive unless for example I replace sitting down with laying down flat on your stomach when you work/rest is better? That should also help stretch the adductors and flexors shouldn't it?


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    It's not your lower back that needs stretching it's your hips abductors and flexors.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't sit, I'm saying lower back pain due to tight hips flexors and abductors if often caused by prolonged sitting i.e. if sitting down takes up a large part of your week due to work like sitting in an office chair 8 hours a day etc.

    You don't need to change your lifestyle or job, you just need to start stretching your flexors to prevent tightening or in your case loosen them up. Also hip strengthening exercises will help.

    Just make sure you stretch out your hips regularly, at least once a day ideally.
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    (Original post by Last Day Lepers)
    It's not your lower back that needs stretching it's your hips abductors and flexors.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't sit, I'm saying lower back pain due to tight hips flexors and abductors if often caused by prolonged sitting i.e. if sitting down takes up a large part of your week due to work like sitting in an office chair 8 hours a day etc.

    You don't need to change your lifestyle or job, you just need to start stretching your flexors to prevent tightening or in your case loosen them up. Also hip strengthening exercises will help.

    Just make sure you stretch out your hips regularly, at least once a day ideally.
    This is the video I got my previous knowledge from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-RZmGB7rqA

    Just to confirm, I need to:
    stretch the hip flexor/abductors and lumbar erectors
    and
    strengthen the abs (lower mainly) and upper hamstrings


    Every morning and night I will do the following exercises for 20 seconds from this link. I will also do scissor movements laying down on the floor, to work my lower abs. Whole thing should just take 5 minutes in the morning and night


    Upper Quad/Hip Flexor (Hip emphasis)


    Basic Hip Flexor


    Adductors


    Lumbar Spinal Erectors


    Thoracic Spinal Erectors
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    (Original post by 00100101)
    This is the video I got my previous knowledge from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-RZmGB7rqA

    Just to confirm, I need to:
    stretch the hip flexor/abductors and lumbar erectors
    and
    strengthen the abs (lower mainly) and upper hamstrings


    Every morning and night I will do the following exercises for 20 seconds from this link. I will also do scissor movements laying down on the floor, to work my lower abs. Whole thing should just take 5 minutes in the morning and night


    Upper Quad/Hip Flexor (Hip emphasis)


    Basic Hip Flexor


    Adductors


    Lumbar Spinal Erectors


    Thoracic Spinal Erectors

    Looks good, hopefully this should help you out.
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    Is it just running on roads?
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    I have a dodgy back and my physio said only to run/ jog on soft surfaces. So try that but if it hurts stop it and cycle or something back friendly until you see a physio. Not worth ****ing up your back for the sack if a few weeks progress.
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    Are you sure when you're jogging you're not striking the heels first/heavily? That will give you back problems because you're thumping the force straight up your spine. You need to land on the midfoot (the base of your toes) or even on your toes initially to correct this.
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    if you google the problem you will be able to find physio type exercises online

    of course it's possible your physio will diagnose something different to your doctor but could be worth getting started
 
 
 
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