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    I'm doing an EPQ based on ecology, no need to go in to depths, I just don't really understand the idea of a null hypothesis, do I write a hypothesis that I know I'm going to disprove? Please help... So confused ..
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    Read through your hypothesis again. Does it imply there is no relationship between two variables, or a certain value of a variable has not changed significantly over time? If so, Treat that as a null hypothesis.
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    What if my draft hypothesis was 'the Eurasian beaver should/should not be reintroduced into the UK'? How do I make it a null hypothesis ?
    Someone told me that all biology hypotheses have to be null. Is that true?
    Also do you always have to disproof a null hypothesis?


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    That sounds more like an opinion. Ask yourself why the beaver should be reintroduced. If your answer involves the words "reduce", "increase" or anything similar, form a hypothesis using those words.
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    (Original post by richiebee)
    What if my draft hypothesis was 'the Eurasian beaver should/should not be reintroduced into the UK'? How do I make it a null hypothesis ?
    Someone told me that all biology hypotheses have to be null. Is that true?
    Also do you always have to disproof a null hypothesis?


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    Null hypothesis is a statistical term, used in statistical testing of a quantitative hypothesis. For example, if you were testing if area A had a higher species diversity than area B, then your null hypothesis would be 'average diversity in A = average diversity in B' and your alternate hypothesis would be 'average diversity in A =/= average diversity in B.'

    However, what you are doing isn't quantitative and the statement 'the Eurasian beaver should/should not be reintroduced into the UK' isn't actually a hypothesis in the statistical sense. That statement is a conclusion really. I'm not sure whether null hypothesis would apply in your case, what justifications are you using to reach a conclusion?


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