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    When I feel I have a slight excess of energy I go and blast it up a hill as fast as I can. I feel like I've learned some things from this namely:

    • even though it's a short distance you must conserve your energy
    • progress comes naturally
    • going slightly further than what's comfortable will rip muscle just like from weightlifting but it gets increasingly harder to do this
    • it seems to increase the length of time that you can hold a fast speed


    I was wondering whether anyone else does hill sprinting and whether you'd like to share some things you've learned?
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      I'd class that as 'hill running'.

      If it was a sprint, you would need to go at a maximum intensity (not conserving energy).

      I keep meaning to get into hill sprints, but haven't got round to it yet.
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      I don't necessarily always do sprinting, I usually do longer hills which are more of a long slog. I've learned that they're awesome, brilliant for injury prevention (i have terrible form, overtrain, have niggles from when I was younger but hardly ever get injured) increasing top speed and also for you're fitness overall. Plus, a hill session doesn't have to last too long so they're great for a double day. They're banging IMHO.
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      (Original post by The_Last_Melon)
      When I feel I have a slight excess of energy I go and blast it up a hill as fast as I can. I feel like I've learned some things from this namely:

      • even though it's a short distance you must conserve your energy
      • progress comes naturally
      • going slightly further than what's comfortable will rip muscle just like from weightlifting but it gets increasingly harder to do this
      • it seems to increase the length of time that you can hold a fast speed


      I was wondering whether anyone else does hill sprinting and whether you'd like to share some things you've learned?

      The part in bold is horse crap. Running uphill will not "rip" you the same as oly squatting under a barbell.
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      (Original post by Last Day Lepers)
      The part in bold is horse crap. Running uphill will not "rip" you the same as oly squatting under a barbell.
      It actually can, to an extent, but not in the way the OP describes it.

      Sprinting – done properly – is a full-body polymetric movement. An incline effectively increases the resistance. Max-effort sprints over short distances (say 20-40m, or a bit longer for the more advanced) forces practically all the muscles in the body to fire as hard and as quickly as they can, which is good for strength, speed and, yes, the muscle that comes with that. You're right that it won't have the same effect as squats, but it's far from useless.

      Sprinting longer distances, as the OP suggests, turns it into a more of a conditioning exercise. Which is fine, sprints are arguably the best way to burn fat, but not really ideal from a strength or speed standpoint.

      The problem with sprints is that they are very stressful, albeit less so the more of an incline you have. I love sprints, but I got a mild hammy-pull on flat ground and so haven't done them for months now.
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      (Original post by commandant)
      I'd class that as 'hill running'.

      If it was a sprint, you would need to go at a maximum intensity (not conserving energy).

      I keep meaning to get into hill sprints, but haven't got round to it yet.
      actually I think you are right, I raced my bro yesterday and my progress wasn't as good as I thought. I guess I was just getting really good at being slow.
     
     
     
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