Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    So, what will everyone be doing for their Comp4 projects? Anyone finding it difficult? People who have already done it, feel free to offer advice.

    I've been torn between a chess program and some sort of projectile motion simulator, but I think it's going to have to be the chess program.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there,

    While you're waiting for an answer, did you know we have 300,000 study resources that could answer your question in TSR's Learn together section?

    We have everything from Teacher Marked Essays to Mindmaps and Quizzes to help you with your work. Take a look around.

    If you're stuck on how to get started, try creating some resources. It's free to do and can help breakdown tough topics into manageable chunks. Get creating now.

    Thanks!

    Not sure what all of this is about? Head here to find out more.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EXTREMEninja)
    So, what will everyone be doing for their Comp4 projects? Anyone finding it difficult? People who have already done it, feel free to offer advice.

    I've been torn between a chess program and some sort of projectile motion simulator, but I think it's going to have to be the chess program.
    What kind of chess program are you thinking?

    I did something similar in high school (a chess AI). It was a whole lot of fun but also quite a bit of work.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    What kind of chess program are you thinking?

    I did something similar in high school (a chess AI). It was a whole lot of fun but also quite a bit of work.
    Well, a program that enforces the majority of the rules (Ideally, all of them) and allows someone to play against the computer. I have no idea whether the computer needs to be very good in order for the project to be 'complex'.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EXTREMEninja)
    Well, a program that enforces the majority of the rules (Ideally, all of them) and allows someone to play against the computer. I have no idea whether the computer needs to be very good in order for the project to be 'complex'.
    Yeah a good AI is probably beyond the scope of what you need to do.

    Even a simple AI is reasonably complicated. You would have to implement all the rules, move generation logic, evaluation function, and at least minimax with quiescent search. A lot of these things are university-level stuff. You'll learn quite a bit though, if you decide to do it.

    If you don't want to actually write the AI part, you can make your program compatible with one of the 2 standard chess "protocols" - xboard and UCI (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_...ation_Protocol and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Chess_Interface).

    That way people can use your GUI to play with a bunch of existing chess AIs.

    If you want to see what the AI code can look like, tcsp would be a good starting point - http://www.tckerrigan.com/Chess/TSCP
    It's designed for educational purposes and very simple.

    Or this one by yours truly - http://bitbucket.matthewlai.ca/brainless
    Definitely not as clean, but also much stronger.

    Also, to write an AI above a certain level (~FIDE master), you would either need to be very good at chess yourself (tournament level), or work with someone who is.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Yeah a good AI is probably beyond the scope of what you need to do.

    Even a simple AI is reasonably complicated. You would have to implement all the rules, move generation logic, evaluation function, and at least minimax with quiescent search. A lot of these things are university-level stuff. You'll learn quite a bit though, if you decide to do it.

    If you don't want to actually write the AI part, you can make your program compatible with one of the 2 standard chess "protocols" - xboard and UCI (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_...ation_Protocol and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Chess_Interface).

    That way people can use your GUI to play with a bunch of existing chess AIs.

    If you want to see what the AI code can look like, tcsp would be a good starting point - http://www.tckerrigan.com/Chess/TSCP
    It's designed for educational purposes and very simple.

    Or this one by yours truly - http://bitbucket.matthewlai.ca/brainless
    Definitely not as clean, but also much stronger.

    Also, to write an AI above a certain level (~FIDE master), you would either need to be very good at chess yourself (tournament level), or work with someone who is.
    Yes, it could get a little complicated. I guess the main thing is to get the rules implemented, and then start on trying to make the computer play to a reasonable level. I do not know whether getting the game to work, and the computer playing quite badly would be sufficient for the project, or whether it needs to play reasonably.

    No problem with the chess skill part, I used to play quite frequently, FIDE rating of 2238.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EXTREMEninja)
    Yes, it could get a little complicated. I guess the main thing is to get the rules implemented, and then start on trying to make the computer play to a reasonable level. I do not know whether getting the game to work, and the computer playing quite badly would be sufficient for the project, or whether it needs to play reasonably.

    No problem with the chess skill part, I used to play quite frequently, FIDE rating of 2238.
    That's awesome! Good luck with the project, then.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Ooh, a chess program sounds like a very interesting project. I've spoken to a dozen people doing projectile motion simulators in various contexts, and while it won't limit your marks, it's probably one of the most common projects to do.

    My project was a student budget planner and tracker, so maths, GUI, databases and a pretty messy add-from-mobile bit. That was fun without a server.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.