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    Hi,

    I am a Canadian student, having recently graduated with an undergraduate degree in Mathematics (gpa: ~3.65). I am not entirely sure how the GPA converts to the UK honours system. With that said, I am starting my Master's at a Canadian university in September, which will be another 2 years (coursework + thesis). After my Master's, I want to apply to the graduate entry programs in the UK. I have had previous experience in mathematics tutoring, a publication in medical physics, tons of marking experience, 2 summer research terms (one in mathematical biology and another in quantum information). Although I lack a bit of clinical volunteering, I hope to have that under my belt whilst doing my Master's. With that said, I want to know how competitive I would be for a British medical school (GEM path). Essentially, I want to settle down in the UK after completing medical school (if I get in that is). Which UK schools are more friendly towards internationals, and less competitive? Are there any UK schools which would have a preference for an applicant with my background?

    All help is appreciated
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Hi,

    I am a Canadian student, having recently graduated with an undergraduate degree in Mathematics (gpa: ~3.65). I am not entirely sure how the GPA converts to the UK honours system. With that said, I am starting my Master's at a Canadian university in September, which will be another 2 years (coursework + thesis). After my Master's, I want to apply to the graduate entry programs in the UK. I have had previous experience in mathematics tutoring, a publication in medical physics, tons of marking experience, 2 summer research terms (one in mathematical biology and another in quantum information). Although I lack a bit of clinical volunteering, I hope to have that under my belt whilst doing my Master's. With that said, I want to know how competitive I would be for a British medical school (GEM path). Essentially, I want to settle down in the UK after completing medical school (if I get in that is). Which UK schools are more friendly towards internationals, and less competitive? Are there any UK schools which would have a preference for an applicant with my background?

    All help is appreciated
    Hello! I applied for GEM before, having 2 bachelors degree (in Nursing and in European Languages) from another country as well.

    The competition is crazy, for a direct entry A100 (5 year Med) the competition is somewhere like 10:1. But when I applied for GEM, the competition was 20:1 since there are only 15 medical schools (including Oxford and Cambridge) that offers GEM.

    Sadly, unlike there, universities here are academically based, except for clinical WPs (Work Placements) and Medical Volunteering.

    I was rejected post-interview. You also need to take aptitude test (BMAT - Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial / UKCAT - for the rest of the med schools).

    I can't answer about the settlement and visa, since I am a "Home" student.

    If you have any questions - just ask
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    Hi there! Thank you for your reply. Yea, I did notice that UK schools are less focused on ECs, in comparison to academics. I was wondering, does it matter whether you take UKCAT or GAMSAT? If so, what are the advantages and disadvantages? Do schools prefer UKCAT over the GAMSAT? Also, any idea on what the conversion from 3.65/4 is to UK grading system? I can't seem to find a reliable conversion chart anywhere . The goal for me is to focus on clinical volunteering throughout the next two years, preferably 2-3 different shadowing opportunities + 1 consistent hospital volunteering positions. One last thing: I am considering studying and writing the MCAT; would that be disadvantages to writing the UKCAT? Prefereably, I'd prefer to write as few exams as possible but of course, if need be, I would write MCAT, BMAT and UKCAT (or GAMSAT).
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Hi there! Thank you for your reply. Yea, I did notice that UK schools are less focused on ECs, in comparison to academics. I was wondering, does it matter whether you take UKCAT or GAMSAT? If so, what are the advantages and disadvantages? Do schools prefer UKCAT over the GAMSAT? Also, any idea on what the conversion from 3.65/4 is to UK grading system? I can't seem to find a reliable conversion chart anywhere . The goal for me is to focus on clinical volunteering throughout the next two years, preferably 2-3 different shadowing opportunities + 1 consistent hospital volunteering positions. One last thing: I am considering studying and writing the MCAT; would that be disadvantages to writing the UKCAT? Prefereably, I'd prefer to write as few exams as possible but of course, if need be, I would write MCAT, BMAT and UKCAT (or GAMSAT).
    According to this website:
    http://www.fulbright.org.uk/pre-depa...cademics/marks

    Your mark will probably be seen to be a 1st.

    Have a look at this website if you haven't already, it has links to all the medical schools that offer GEM:
    http://www.medschools.ac.uk/students.../graduate.aspx

    Also have a look at this thread/article as it breaks down all the med schools GEM courses:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...cine_-_a_guide
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    GEM is ridiculously hard to get into....and for foreign students even more so as there may be only 3-4 places for you....


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    (Original post by jay2013)
    According to this website:
    http://www.fulbright.org.uk/pre-depa...cademics/marks

    Your mark will probably be seen to be a 1st.

    Have a look at this website if you haven't already, it has links to all the medical schools that offer GEM:
    http://www.medschools.ac.uk/students.../graduate.aspx

    Also have a look at this thread/article as it breaks down all the med schools GEM courses:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...cine_-_a_guide
    THank you for the resources! I did take a look at the last link, and its definitely very helpful.

    (Original post by cobens)
    GEM is ridiculously hard to get into....and for foreign students even more so as there may be only 3-4 places for you....


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    Yea.... Kinda bummed out about that. All I can do is hope that I somehow can do well on the aptitudes and have a strong application, with a ton of luck. If I applied for the foundation year program, would the universities be looking at my high school marks or undergraduate marks? Given that I graduated from a Canadian high school, I did not do A-levels, IB or AP, so I am not sure how that would work
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    THank you for the resources! I did take a look at the last link, and its definitely very helpful.



    Yea.... Kinda bummed out about that. All I can do is hope that I somehow can do well on the aptitudes and have a strong application, with a ton of luck. If I applied for the foundation year program, would the universities be looking at my high school marks or undergraduate marks? Given that I graduated from a Canadian high school, I did not do A-levels, IB or AP, so I am not sure how that would work
    You're planning to apply for the 6 year programme? It's gonna be expensive and you'll be competing against Post A-level students.
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    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    You're planning to apply for the 6 year programme? It's gonna be expensive and you'll be competing against Post A-level students.
    Well I want to apply to the GEM but as someone just said, it's very competitive. I am not writing it off at all but I wanted to know how I would be looked upon as say, an applicant to the 6-year program. Would they look at my high school marks or would it be my undergrad/grad transcript they'd consider? At this point, I am just trying to get as much information as possible. Also for medicine, the banks here give a line of credit of 150k-200k, which I would assume probably covers half of the expenses of a British medical education for me. These are essentially questions for future planning lol ...
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Well I want to apply to the GEM but as someone just said, it's very competitive. I am not writing it off at all but I wanted to know how I would be looked upon as say, an applicant to the 6-year program. Would they look at my high school marks or would it be my undergrad/grad transcript they'd consider? At this point, I am just trying to get as much information as possible. Also for medicine, the banks here give a line of credit of 150k-200k, which I would assume probably covers half of the expenses of a British medical education for me. These are essentially questions for future planning lol ...
    I have a place at a UK medical school for the foundation medicine course and I'm a graduate. They expected me to have at least a 2:1 so you would be fine with that requirement and BBB at A level. I do believe there is a website where you can check the equivalency of your qualifications to the UK school leaving qualifications.
    So in response to your first question they would look at both high school and undergrad transcript, I had to send in both mine after receiving my offer for them to confirm. I'm a UK citizen though so have gone through the british system (A levels and all that)

    In terms of the funding I am having to self fund the whole course up until year 4 (as after that the NHS would then pay for my last 2 years fees) however I dont know if NHS funding would be available for a non UK resident so I guess that would be something to find out.
    But if you have 150-200k you would be more than secured in terms of funding as it amounts to:
    6 x £9000 a year = £54,000 + Your living expenses which if you are living on lets say 10k a year would only take you up to about £110k so you should be fine finance wise.

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Hi there! Thank you for your reply. Yea, I did notice that UK schools are less focused on ECs, in comparison to academics. I was wondering, does it matter whether you take UKCAT or GAMSAT? If so, what are the advantages and disadvantages? Do schools prefer UKCAT over the GAMSAT? Also, any idea on what the conversion from 3.65/4 is to UK grading system? I can't seem to find a reliable conversion chart anywhere . The goal for me is to focus on clinical volunteering throughout the next two years, preferably 2-3 different shadowing opportunities + 1 consistent hospital volunteering positions. One last thing: I am considering studying and writing the MCAT; would that be disadvantages to writing the UKCAT? Prefereably, I'd prefer to write as few exams as possible but of course, if need be, I would write MCAT, BMAT and UKCAT (or GAMSAT).
    I would say the 3.65 is equivalent to a high upper 2nd class. Generally most people consider a 3.7+ to be a 1st. Nearly all the med schools require a upper 2nd so you should be eligible.

    If you score well on the MCAT, you might want to apply to Edinburgh as they take the MCAT for Canadian students. Otherwise I would definitely write the UKCAT as that is needed for all the undergraduate 5-6 year programs.
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    (Original post by Baronred)
    I have a place at a UK medical school for the foundation medicine course and I'm a graduate. They expected me to have at least a 2:1 so you would be fine with that requirement and BBB at A level. I do believe there is a website where you can check the equivalency of your qualifications to the UK school leaving qualifications.
    So in response to your first question they would look at both high school and undergrad transcript, I had to send in both mine after receiving my offer for them to confirm. I'm a UK citizen though so have gone through the british system (A levels and all that)

    In terms of the funding I am having to self fund the whole course up until year 4 (as after that the NHS would then pay for my last 2 years fees) however I dont know if NHS funding would be available for a non UK resident so I guess that would be something to find out.
    But if you have 150-200k you would be more than secured in terms of funding as it amounts to:
    6 x £9000 a year = £54,000 + Your living expenses which if you are living on lets say 10k a year would only take you up to about £110k so you should be fine finance wise.

    Hope that helps
    So, if I were to apply for the A100, as a grad, I'll have to pay for 3 years??? Good lord.

    Also, remember that international students are charge differently from us home student, so it's not going to be just 54k, plus the difference in living expenses - not to mention that he might be talking about 200k dollars, not pounds.
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Well I want to apply to the GEM but as someone just said, it's very competitive. I am not writing it off at all but I wanted to know how I would be looked upon as say, an applicant to the 6-year program. Would they look at my high school marks or would it be my undergrad/grad transcript they'd consider? At this point, I am just trying to get as much information as possible. Also for medicine, the banks here give a line of credit of 150k-200k, which I would assume probably covers half of the expenses of a British medical education for me. These are essentially questions for future planning lol ...
    The foundation year courses are more competitive than the regular A100 courses and I would expect at least some of them to reject you outright - they're generally for people who did not do the right A-levels or who had problems which mean they won't get the grades to apply for A100. I would expect an application from a graduate with a Masters and good grades to be most unwelcome, but I may be wrong.

    Also whether you need to do the UKCAT or GAMSAT for grad entry or BMAT/UKCAT/nothing for A100 courses depends entirely on the medical school you're looking at. MCAT will likely mean absolutely nothing to any med school but the one mentioned by someone above.
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    TBH you would do better applying to Ireland with the Atlantic Bridge Program.



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    (Original post by Baronred)
    I have a place at a UK medical school for the foundation medicine course and I'm a graduate. They expected me to have at least a 2:1 so you would be fine with that requirement and BBB at A level. I do believe there is a website where you can check the equivalency of your qualifications to the UK school leaving qualifications.
    So in response to your first question they would look at both high school and undergrad transcript, I had to send in both mine after receiving my offer for them to confirm. I'm a UK citizen though so have gone through the british system (A levels and all that)

    In terms of the funding I am having to self fund the whole course up until year 4 (as after that the NHS would then pay for my last 2 years fees) however I dont know if NHS funding would be available for a non UK resident so I guess that would be something to find out.
    But if you have 150-200k you would be more than secured in terms of funding as it amounts to:
    6 x £9000 a year = £54,000 + Your living expenses which if you are living on lets say 10k a year would only take you up to about £110k so you should be fine finance wise.

    Hope that helps
    Oh I see! My high school grades were okay (Top 6 4U courses, which is what I think they want for Canadian applicants, was ~89%). Also, I think the tuition for us would be so much more, probably around ~21k pounds a year. Still, at the moment, I am not considering the cost as a factor. Thank you for your reply

    (Original post by ukmed108)
    I would say the 3.65 is equivalent to a high upper 2nd class. Generally most people consider a 3.7+ to be a 1st. Nearly all the med schools require a upper 2nd so you should be eligible.

    If you score well on the MCAT, you might want to apply to Edinburgh as they take the MCAT for Canadian students. Otherwise I would definitely write the UKCAT as that is needed for all the undergraduate 5-6 year programs.
    I'll definitely look into Edinburgh, although I have heard international students that graduate from there have a harder time matching into postgrad in the UK. Not sure though. And I am really hopeful that my GPA is considered 1st or upper 2nd (also, what might be the equivalent of ~84% overall in undergrad)?

    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    So, if I were to apply for the A100, as a grad, I'll have to pay for 3 years??? Good lord.

    Also, remember that international students are charge differently from us home student, so it's not going to be just 54k, plus the difference in living expenses - not to mention that he might be talking about 200k dollars, not pounds.
    Yep! I was saying I may get access to a line of credit of 200k dollars. Sorry for the confusion

    (Original post by Ronove)
    The foundation year courses are more competitive than the regular A100 courses and I would expect at least some of them to reject you outright - they're generally for people who did not do the right A-levels or who had problems which mean they won't get the grades to apply for A100. I would expect an application from a graduate with a Masters and good grades to be most unwelcome, but I may be wrong.

    Also whether you need to do the UKCAT or GAMSAT for grad entry or BMAT/UKCAT/nothing for A100 courses depends entirely on the medical school you're looking at. MCAT will likely mean absolutely nothing to any med school but the one mentioned by someone above.
    Hmmm, it does seem like I'll have to do the UKCAT/GAMSAT and/or BMAT, if I do consider the UK (which I really am). I am looking around the web and most sources are saying that there is no way to study for the UKCAT. Is this true? Apparently it tests your "innate abilities".
    (Original post by Newtothis83)
    TBH you would do better applying to Ireland with the Atlantic Bridge Program.



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    Hey thanks for the reply! I am consider the ABP to Ireland although I have heard that it's really tough to match for a residency in Ireland after graduation. I actually read somewhere (trying to find that source) that recently there were some new immigration laws which allow non-EU graduates of UK medical schools to be considered on equal footing as EU grads of UK medical schools, when applying for foundation programs/residencies, after medical school. This is one of the main reasons I am hoping to go to a UK med school. Would you know if Ireland has a similar system?
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Oh I'll definitely look into Edinburgh, although I have heard international students that graduate from there have a harder time matching into postgrad in the UK.
    Edinburgh is one of the best universities when it comes to medical science / profession (if I'm not mistaken).

    You'll be a good candidate for the Foundations Programme (Junior Doctor) after you finish your degree in Edinburgh - it ranked 3rd in the whole UK for 2014 league table (complete university guide league table).
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    (Original post by popeyespinach)
    Hmmm, it does seem like I'll have to do the UKCAT/GAMSAT and/or BMAT, if I do consider the UK (which I really am). I am looking around the web and most sources are saying that there is no way to study for the UKCAT. Is this true? Apparently it tests your "innate abilities".
    The general consensus is that that is a steaming pile of bull****. You absolutely can prepare for the UKCAT and practise the things it asks of you. There are books and courses and subscriptions to question databases around that will help. The courses seem to potentially be a lot of money for very little but I would recommend at least getting a book, and definitely sharpening your basic maths skills when in a high pressure timed situation.
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    (Original post by EcstaZEEH)
    Edinburgh is one of the best universities when it comes to medical science / profession (if I'm not mistaken).

    You'll be a good candidate for the Foundations Programme (Junior Doctor) after you finish your degree in Edinburgh - it ranked 3rd in the whole UK for 2014 league table (complete university guide league table).
    Foundation Programme applications do not involve where you graduated from. University rankings are also something you should think critically about rather than following like a lemon.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    The general consensus is that that is a steaming pile of bull****. You absolutely can prepare for the UKCAT and practise the things it asks of you. There are books and courses and subscriptions to question databases around that will help. The courses seem to potentially be a lot of money for very little but I would recommend at least getting a book, and definitely sharpening your basic maths skills when in a high pressure timed situation.

    That's very helpful, thanks! I'll definitely buy some prep material to look into, probably to get a bit of a head start before I actually make the decision to write it.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Foundation Programme applications do not involve where you graduated from. University rankings are also something you should think critically about rather than following like a lemon.
    I see your point, I did apply for Oxford and sadly was rejected post-interview, I believe that the Foundation Programme is a point-based application (based on qualification like intercalated BSc / Undergrad Masters, etc.) I was referring to the intercalated programmes that can boost your application. I know your university won't have anything to do with it, since almost all of the universities that offer GEM is in Russell group anyway.
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    The general consensus is that that is a steaming pile of bull****. You absolutely can prepare for the UKCAT and practise the things it asks of you. There are books and courses and subscriptions to question databases around that will help. The courses seem to potentially be a lot of money for very little but I would recommend at least getting a book, and definitely sharpening your basic maths skills when in a high pressure timed situation.
    You can prepare for it like timing and all, but other than that, no - it is an aptitude test anyway.

    I've also seen your post about dropping out of Uni and applying for Med school? I would like to wish you the best of like with that as well.
 
 
 
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